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Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 08:42 AM
I was just translating this bit of text, and I can't seem to get it right:

"On June 1st, 1968 in Westport, in the American state of Connecticut, passed away one of the most famous bravest women of this century: Helen Keller."

It seems a bit wrong to me. Probably because it is. The Dutch sentence was weird and confusing, whenever that happens, my English goes weird too =/ Anyway...help would be appreciated...how do I fix this? preferably with "Helen Keller" still at the end, cuz that's kind of important in the translation I think.

nieh
07-02-2005, 08:43 AM
On June 1st, 1968 in Westport, in the American state of Connecticut, one of the most famous bravest women of this century passed away: Helen Keller.

Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 08:44 AM
Thank you!!! :)

Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 08:49 AM
I can't believe I didn't think of that! My mind always goes blank when I'm translating! Suddenly I don't know Dutch OR English anymore. It's frustrating. Especially because I'm planning on being a translator in the future. Hmmz.

Endymion
07-02-2005, 08:52 AM
the most famous bravest
"the most famous and bravest"

Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 08:53 AM
"the most famous and bravest"

Yeah, I noticed that one, I changed that one before you pointed it out :)

Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 08:57 AM
While we're at it, can someone explain when to use "fast" and when "quick"? I always just pick one, but surely there must be a difference? There's only one word for them in Dutch.

And would this be right? -->

"Once this was achieved, Helenís development went very fast. "

holland
07-02-2005, 09:14 AM
While we're at it, can someone explain when to use "fast" and when "quick"? I always just pick one, but surely there must be a difference? There's only one word for them in Dutch.

And would this be right? -->

"Once this was achieved, Helenís development went very fast. "

You could use fast or quickly, whatever one you want really.

Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 09:49 AM
there's no difference?

holland
07-02-2005, 09:53 AM
there's no difference?

Nope! quickly is just another way of saying it.

If you need any more help, I can help you. All you have to do is ask. :}

Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 09:54 AM
Thanks! :)

holland
07-02-2005, 09:57 AM
Thanks! :)

You're welcome!

TheUnholyNightbringer
07-02-2005, 10:28 AM
I'm sure there's a difference between "quick" and "fast". It's like the difference between less and fewer. I'm sure.

Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 10:33 AM
I'm sure there's a difference between "quick" and "fast". It's like the difference between less and fewer. I'm sure.

I was waiting for you to reply...:P Can you explain?

0r4ng3
07-02-2005, 12:56 PM
I'm sure there's a difference between "quick" and "fast". It's like the difference between less and fewer. I'm sure.
Quick is a sudden motion or event that stops as quickly as it began. Fast is a constant, fast pace.

Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 01:13 PM
So fast was right in this case?

0r4ng3
07-02-2005, 01:17 PM
So fast was right in this case?
Close call, but I think it's right. For that case, either one would have worked.

Tizzalicious
07-02-2005, 01:19 PM
Okay, thanks! =)

mental napalm
07-08-2005, 04:22 AM
Quick is a sudden motion or event that stops as quickly as it began. Fast is a constant, fast pace.
ok pretty much hes right but its easier if i use examples "john ran through the forest as fast as he could" john is in continous motion usualy used in action or to describe body movement (mainly running). quick also describes body movement but it mainly invovles choppy short distance movements (grab, kick, jolt, ect...). :confused: how did i know that?

Rabbit209
07-08-2005, 05:03 AM
less is less then fewer i think. Like say if you had five apples and bob had 10 and then stacey had 1. it would be like, "Stacey has fewer apples then you, and you have less then bob" of course you could switch them around and it would still kind of work. Damn English speaking people.

Paint_It_Black
07-08-2005, 05:22 AM
I think "was" would sound better than "went", but I couldn't explain why adequately without a lot of confusing rambling.

JoY
07-08-2005, 05:37 AM
less is less then fewer i think. Like say if you had five apples and bob had 10 and then stacey had 1. it would be like, "Stacey has fewer apples then you, and you have less then bob" of course you could switch them around and it would still kind of work. Damn English speaking people.
THAN. geez, it's than.

TheUnholyNightbringer
07-08-2005, 05:39 AM
less is less then fewer i think. Like say if you had five apples and bob had 10 and then stacey had 1. it would be like, "Stacey has fewer apples then you, and you have less then bob" of course you could switch them around and it would still kind of work. Damn English speaking people.

I have a simpler explanation.

"Fewer" is referring to multiple objects and "less" is a part of a whole.

JoY
07-08-2005, 05:40 AM
what? you can't say "less apples"?
you people fuck with English, I swear.

TheUnholyNightbringer
07-08-2005, 05:41 AM
You can say "less apple". But only if you have one apple.

Otherwise, yes, it'd be "fewer apples".

JoY
07-08-2005, 05:42 AM
google says; The word fewer means a smaller number and the number can be counted.
The word less means a smaller amount.

JoY
07-08-2005, 05:43 AM
You can say "less apple". But only if you have one apple.

Otherwise, yes, it'd be "fewer apples".
as in, less apple, because you ate some?
bastard. I want an apple now. :(

TheUnholyNightbringer
07-08-2005, 05:44 AM
google says; The word fewer means a smaller number and the number can be counted.
The word less means a smaller amount.

Yup, that's right.


as in, less apple, because you ate some?
bastard. I want an apple now. :(

Yeah, less of a single apple.

Aw, I'm sorry. You could go have one?

Tizzalicious
07-08-2005, 05:58 AM
I think you can say:

I should eat less apple.

If you are taling about eating less apple in general too...right...?

Or not?

TheUnholyNightbringer
07-08-2005, 05:58 AM
I think you can say:

I should eat less apple.

If you are taling about eating less apple in general too...right...?

Or not?

Hm. "I should eat fewer apples" is probably better.

It doesn't matter, I'm a complete fuckup with both of them in real life.

Tizzalicious
07-08-2005, 06:01 AM
If you stuff yourself with apples every day though...you can't really count them anymore?

TheUnholyNightbringer
07-08-2005, 06:02 AM
If you stuff yourself with apples every day though...you can't really count them anymore?

No, but it's still not part of a whole. =P

JoY
07-08-2005, 06:17 AM
Tizzz.. gul... just say "I shouldn't eat so many apples."

Tizzalicious
07-08-2005, 06:21 AM
Tizzz.. gul... just say "I shouldn't eat so many apples."

I won't say it at all...I love my apples!

JoY
07-08-2005, 06:21 AM
I ate crisps & chocolate today & yesterday & now I feel sick & fat. =(

Noodles is gay
07-08-2005, 06:42 AM
On June 1st, 1968 in Westport, in the American state of Connecticut, one of the most famous bravest women of this century passed away: Helen Keller.

needs a semicolon. Alternatively:

On June 1st, 1968, in Westport, Connecticut USA, one of the bravest and most famous women of this century passed away; Helen Keller.


yeah, you've probably already got a version but that's possibly what I'd do - I don't like the first bit though.

nieh
07-08-2005, 07:48 AM
semi-colons are used for two separate thoughts. Helen Keller is more of a "list" than a separate thought (even though there's just one of her) so the colon should have been fine.

0r4ng3
07-08-2005, 03:03 PM
You can say "less apple". But only if you have one apple.

Otherwise, yes, it'd be "fewer apples".
It's like the difference between "much" and "many". You can have many apples, but not much apples.

Oops, sorry for starting even more confusion.

JoY
07-08-2005, 03:10 PM
I -think- about every Dutch person with her intelligence knows that.

shadowind
07-08-2005, 03:22 PM
i just use whatever( whatever sounds right)

but my grammer is horrible so i wouldn't listen to me if i were you

Little_Miss_1565
07-08-2005, 03:30 PM
semi-colons are used for two separate thoughts. Helen Keller is more of a "list" than a separate thought (even though there's just one of her) so the colon should have been fine.

You are correct, sir. The semi-colon is wrong.