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crazy_offspring_gal
10-14-2005, 02:10 AM
Ok so, ashleys going on at my like this unactive volcano down south of something, and saying like if a chunk of it would fall off, it could cause a wave to go into the Uk 25 miles in.

Now im thinking... what the fuck. because i'm thinking tidal waves are caused my earthquakes/activity under the sea by the earth plates. now if im correct we are on the Eurasian plate. so like... yes, im very confused.

the_offsprings_monkey
10-14-2005, 02:13 AM
Ok so, ashleys going on at my like this unactive volcano down south of something, and saying like if a chunk of it would fall off, it could cause a wave to go into the Uk 25 miles in.

Now im thinking... what the fuck. because i'm thinking tidal waves are caused my earthquakes/activity under the sea by the earth plates. now if im correct we are on the Eurasian plate. so like... yes, im very confused.
More like a tsunami, and as I said it was my physics teacher who told me.

crazy_offspring_gal
10-14-2005, 02:14 AM
More like a tsunami, and as I said it was my physics teacher who told me.
You'r physics teacher is gay...

Paint_It_Black
10-14-2005, 02:27 AM
Ok so, ashleys going on at my like this unactive volcano down south of something


I'm confused too. What are you saying?

crazy_offspring_gal
10-14-2005, 02:40 AM
I'm confused too. What are you saying?
Well, he said to me that there is this unactive volcano down south of england right. (were we live) and he said that if a bit drops off of it.. it will cause a wave to go in-land 25 miles. (and wash out were we live).. I was like.. What the fuck?

Paint_It_Black
10-14-2005, 02:45 AM
So this inactive volcano is supposedly in the sea? How would a bit fall off?

the_offsprings_monkey
10-14-2005, 02:50 AM
*sigh* ok

Around this time of the year many Britons look towards the Canary Islands for a sunshine break. What most don't know, however, is that on one of the Canary Islands lies a major global catastrophe in the making, a natural disaster so big that it could flatten the Atlantic coastlines of Britain, Europe, North Africa and the United States of America and cause enormous damage to London and other UK cities. Scattered across the world,s oceans are a handful of rare geological time-bombs which, once unleashed, create an extraordinary phenomenon, a gigantic tidal wave, called a Mega Tsunami. These are able to cross oceans and ravage countries on the other side of the world. The word Tsunami derives from the Japanese for harbour wave. They are normally generated by offshore earthquakes, sub-marine landslides and undersea volcanic activity, and range from barely perceptible waves to walls of water up to 300 feet high.

Recently, scientists have realised that the next Mega Tsunami is likely to begin on one of the Canary Islands, off the coast of North Africa, where a wall of water will one day race across the entire Atlantic Ocean at the speed of a jet airliner to devastate the east coast of the United States, the Caribbean and Brazil.

Dr Simon Day, who works at the Benfield Greig Hazards Research Centre, University College London*, says that one flank of the Cumbre Vieja volcano on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, is unstable and could plunge into the ocean during the volcano's next eruption.

Dr. Day says: "If the volcano collapsed in one block of almost 20 cubic kilometres of rock, weighing 500 billion tonnes - twice the size of the Isle of Wight - it would fall into water almost 4 miles deep and create an undersea wave 2000 feet tall. Within five minutes of the landslide, a dome of water about a mile high would form and then collapse, before the Mega Tsunami fanned out in every direction, travelling at speeds of up to 500 mph. A 330ft wave would strike the western Sahara in less than an hour."

Europe would be protected from the fiercest force by the position of the other Canary Islands, but the tsunami would still bring 33ft waves to Lisbon and La Coruņa within three hours.

After six hours it would reach Britain, where waves up to 40 ft high would hit southwest England at 500 miles per hour, travel a mile inland and obliterate almost everything in its path. Even Britain's more sheltered shores, in the North Sea and Irish Sea, will be struck by smaller but still significant swells, causing widespread flooding in major coastal cities.

"We need better models to see what the precise effects on Britain will be." Dr. Day said. However, it is likely that London could suffer sever inundation as the Thames Barrier's ability to cope with such a dramatic rise in water levels exceeds its design specifications.

"The Thames estuary is already subject to major tidal surges," says Dr. Day, "and the Mega Tsunami could raise water levels by as much as 20 feet, with the surge travelling up the river at some 200 miles per hour." Devastation along both banks of the Thames would be huge, with many parts of the City and areas along both the north and south banks of the river as far as Putney Bridge and beyond experiencing severe damage. The effects on the London underground are hard to imagine, but the entire network would become flooded and the consequent loss of life would be immense."

Indeed, parts of London would be uninhabitable for perhaps months and the cost of repairing and rebuilding the damage would be astronomical. Imagine, if you will, what effects such a massive inundation would have on some of our major public buildings near the Thames; The Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, Canary Wharf, Buckingham Palace, The Tower of London, and the South Bank are only a few of the many London landmarks that would be severely damaged, as indeed would the entire City of London.

However, the destruction in the United Kingdom will be as nothing compared to the devastation reeked on the eastern seaboard of the United States. Dr. Day claims that the Mega Tsunami will generate a wave that will be inconceivably catastrophic. He says: "It will surge across the Atlantic at 500 miles per hour in less than seven hours, engulfing the whole US east coast with a wave almost two hundred feet high " higher than Nelson,s Column " sweeping away everything in its path up to 20 miles inland. Boston would be hit first, followed by New York, then all the way down the coast to Miami, the Caribbean and Brazil." Millions would be killed, and as Dr. Day explains: "It's not a question of "if" Cumbre Vieja collapses, it's simply a question of "when".

crazy_offspring_gal
10-14-2005, 02:50 AM
So this inactive volcano is supposedly in the sea? How would a bit fall off?
Excatly, i was like.. umm.. yea. Because I don't know of this 'unactive volcano' inless im very stupid.

Ok now.. he's telling me this -

Dr. Day says: "If the volcano collapsed in one block of almost 20 cubic kilometres of rock, weighing 500 billion tonnes - twice the size of the Isle of Wight - it would fall into water almost 4 miles deep and create an undersea wave 2000 feet tall. Within five minutes of the landslide, a dome of water about a mile high would form and then collapse, before the Mega Tsunami fanned out in every direction, travelling at speeds of up to 500 mph. A 330ft wave would strike the western Sahara in less than an hour."

Umm.. What the fuck!

the_offsprings_monkey
10-14-2005, 02:55 AM
Also found this

A wave higher than Nelson's Column and travelling faster than a jet aircraft will devastate the eastern seaboard of America and inundate much of southern Britain, say scientists who have analysed the effects of a future volcanic eruption in the Canary Islands.

A massive slab of rock twice the volume of the Isle of Man would break away from the island of La Palma and smash into the Atlantic Ocean to cause a tsunami * a monster wave * bigger than any recorded, the scientists warned yesterday.

Most of the wave's energy, equivalent to the combined output of America's power stations for six months, would travel westwards to the American coast but enough would be flicked north towards the English Channel to cause catastrophic coastal damage.

A computer model has been designed to show the way the tsunami will build after the volcano, called Cumbre Vieja, erupts on La Palma, at the western end of the Spanish island chain. It describes the almost unimaginable scale of an event that the scientists say could happen at any time within the foreseeable future.

"We're looking at an event that could be decades or a century away * but there will be a degree of warning beforehand," said Simon Day, of the Benfield Greg Hazard Reseach Centre at Univeristy College London.

Most of the rocky western flank of Cumbre Vieja is unstable enough to be dislodged in the next big eruption of the volcano, which is active enough to explode at least once or twice a century. Its last big event was in 1949.

Such a landslide from a future eruption could travel up to 60 kilometres (37 miles) from La Palma's coast, causing the formation and then collapse of a dome of water 900 metres (3,000ft) high and tens of kilometres wide. The bow of this collapsing dome of water would become a giant wave, but also, as the landslide continued to move underwater, a series of crests and troughs would soon generate the "wave train" of the tsunami.

With the leading wave in front and crests pushing it on behind, it would sustain the power for the nine-hour journey to the American east coast.

Tsunami means harbour wave in Japanese and, though the occurrence has nothing to do with the tides, it is often called a tidal wave in English. Throughout history they have caused widespread devastation, with Britain last being affected by one in 1755 when an earthquake in Lisbon caused an unusually large wave to hit southern ports.

The computer model, compiled in collaboration with Steven Ward of the University of California, Santa Cruz, predicts that the tsunami will have a height of 100 metres (330ft) from crest to trough when it crashes into the shores of nearby north-west Africa. By the time it reached its final destination, the east coast of Florida and the Caribbean islands, the tsunami would still be up to 50 metres high.

Low-lying land in Florida would be vulnerable to a sea wave that would inundate the mainland for several kilometres inland. Everything in its path would be flattened, the computer model predicted.

Even though the wave would be much smaller when it reached Britain, it would still breach sea defences because it would be larger than the biggest storm waves for which they were designed, Dr Day said. "For low-lying land along the south coast it could penetrate up to a mile," he said.

Although there is little doubt that the landslide on La Palma will happen after a volcanic eruption, the difficulty is knowing exactly when it will occur. "Eruptions of Cumbre Vieja occur at intervals of decades to a century or so and there may be a number of eruptions before its collapse," Dr Day said. "Although the year-to-year probability of a collapse is therefore low, the resulting tsunami would be a major disaster with indirect effects around the world."

The scientists are calling for better warning instruments to be placed on La Palma so that an impending eruption can be detected quickly enough to alert other areas that might be affected by a tsunami.

"Cumbre Vieja needs to be monitored closely for any signs of impending volcanic activity and for the deformation that would precede collapse. The collapse will occur during some future eruption after days or weeks of precursory deformation and earthquakes," Dr Day predicted.

"An effective earthquake monitoring system could provide advanced warning of a likely collapse and allow early emergency management organisations a valuable window of time in which to plan and respond," he said.

crazy_offspring_gal
10-14-2005, 03:21 AM
I was really hopeing that WCM will post here saying how stupid I am and that I'm totaly wrong about this... oh well.

TheUnholyNightbringer
10-14-2005, 05:09 AM
Just boil it all down to.. if it blowz, we'z fuckd.

Tijs
10-14-2005, 07:37 AM
It's easy, if you throw a rock into the water, you see little waves in the water. If a huge chunk of the volcano falls into the water, there will be huge waves: a tsunami.

A tsunami doesn't have to be caused by earthquackes/movement under water. It's all about the height of the waves.

But that volcano is in-active so you probably don't have to worry about that one in your life-time. However, there's an active volcano near the coast of Africa, and that can cause a lot of trouble in Africa, Europe and north and south America. It will cause way more deaths than the 220.000 (if I'm not mistaking) in Asia last Christmas. For example: New York City will dissapear.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/graphics/2001/08/29/nwave29.gif

Maybe the_offsprings_monkey already said all of what I said, but who's gonna read those posts?

the_offsprings_monkey
10-14-2005, 08:38 AM
Wonder how much time we would get to get out.

Sinister
10-14-2005, 08:39 AM
It's easy, if you throw a rock into the water, you see little waves in the water. If a huge chunk of the volcano falls into the water, there will be huge waves: a tsunami...


holy crap. :eek:

the_offsprings_monkey
10-14-2005, 08:43 AM
Yea scary shit, as I always said, GO NORTH!!!, RUN RUN

Tijs
10-14-2005, 08:46 AM
Going inland to high areas would be even better.

Sinister
10-14-2005, 08:47 AM
Going inland to heigh areas would be even better.

actually, I just realized I'm may more inland than the minimum safe distance.

the_offsprings_monkey
10-14-2005, 12:32 PM
actually, I just realized I'm may more inland than the minimum safe distance.
You are luck mate, my city is right on the edge so we will get it the worse.

0r4ng3
12-11-2005, 05:21 AM
Just boil it all down to.. if it blowz, we'z fuckd.
Seconded.

Well, not really, cuz i'm'z not fuckd. Just themz.

Tizzalicious
12-11-2005, 06:43 AM
Ashley is right. I've seen it on TV too. I didn't read all of the long replies here though. But yes, a part of La Palma will slide into the sea, and cause a tsunami.

wheelchairman
12-11-2005, 06:52 AM
I'm no scientist, and have absolutely no education or interest in the sciences. However I'd be more sceptic. The media is always bombarding us with potential horror stories. If it's not the tsunami created by La Palma, it's a meteor heading towards Earth that will re-create the same situation the dinosaurs faced, or it's the bird flu. Or whatever.

Natural disasters are inevitable. However the idea that a chunk of rock falling off an island of the coast of England, would have enough momentum to reach the Eastern coast of the United States seems...unlikely? It'd have to be a really big rock, now wouldn't it? And there would have to be a synergy effect of some sort.

My point is, why worry about this? Currently, the biggest risks in your life are
1. Being hit by cars
2. Sexually transmitted diseases from unprotected intercourse
3. Alcohol poisoning or accidents related to being under the influence.

Anything else should be ignored.

The Talking Pie
12-11-2005, 08:09 AM
We're not talking about a chunk though... more like half of the landmass of the thing.

T-6005
12-11-2005, 10:35 AM
I don't correct people on spelling mistakes, but it's "inactive" and "unless".


In any case, wouldn't there need to be some kind of outside force to cause a "block of almost 20 cubic kilometres of rock, weighing 500 billion tonnes - twice the size of the Isle of Wight" to do anything, let alone break off completely?
It's an inactive volcano, so why would they say "during the volcano's next eruption"?