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hobbolo
12-08-2005, 11:41 PM
skool is gay it is point less and boring

bd007h
12-08-2005, 11:43 PM
so is this thread

the_offsprings_monkey
12-08-2005, 11:59 PM
skool is gay it is point less and boring
School could help you with your grammar and spelling.

HornyPope
12-09-2005, 12:01 AM
School could help you with your grammar and spelling.

http://tinypic.com/id7yu9.jpg

Yada yada you know the words.

the_offsprings_monkey
12-09-2005, 12:02 AM
http://tinypic.com/id7yu9.jpg

Yada yada you know the words.
Shut up you ignorant prick.

bd007h
12-09-2005, 12:03 AM
Shut you you ignorant prick.


selfpwnage?

T-6005
12-09-2005, 12:03 AM
Shut up you ignorant prick.
You really are completely blind to everything, aren't you?

the_offsprings_monkey
12-09-2005, 12:04 AM
You really are completely blind to everything, aren't you?
Yes !

the_GoDdEsS
12-09-2005, 01:11 AM
I can't wait till you fuckers get out of school and have to start working.

wheelchairman
12-09-2005, 05:06 AM
I can't wait till you fuckers get out of school and have to start working.
I'm doing my best to assure that this never happens.

Although while the starter of this thread is a retard, isn't school (or at least the grades up until the end of high school (or equivalent thereof)) rather pointless?

TheUnholyNightbringer
12-09-2005, 06:18 AM
Not exactly, since they help you go onto college and so forth, hence grades that do matter.

wheelchairman
12-09-2005, 06:21 AM
Not exactly, since they help you go onto college and so forth, hence grades that do matter.
Not really. I don't know how the British system works but chances are, if you want to get into college you can. Unless of course you want to be a doctor or a lawyer or something gay like that. However there are always alternative possibilities into getting higher grades, at least in most countries.

Furthermore different Unis have different acceptance levels for varying subjects. And many of the most interesting subjects don't even have acceptance level, for example here Theology and Eastern European studies don't, this is because they are particularly hard. But if you want to study with a basis of bad grades, then there is nothing preventing you.

Although a person's happiness, I'm fairly certain will be the same no matter what they are doing. Unless they are complete fuckups.

TheUnholyNightbringer
12-09-2005, 06:25 AM
Not really. I don't know how the British system works but chances are, if you want to get into college you can. Unless of course you want to be a doctor or a lawyer or something gay like that. However there are always alternative possibilities into getting higher grades, at least in most countries.

Furthermore different Unis have different acceptance levels for varying subjects. And many of the most interesting subjects don't even have acceptance level, for example here Theology and Eastern European studies don't, this is because they are particularly hard. But if you want to study with a basis of bad grades, then there is nothing preventing you.

Although a person's happiness, I'm fairly certain will be the same no matter what they are doing. Unless they are complete fuckups.

Reputation of the college/University you go to has a big influence on a lot of things over here. For example, when applying for a job. And most of the schools with excellent reputations (Oxford and Camebridge being the obvious ones) require disastrously high grades to even apply.

It's the same with college - the less of a reputation the college has, the easier it is to get into. The trend tends to be that the easier the college is to get into, the harder it is to get any kind of decent grade - be that because of the students, teachers, whatever.

Obviously I'm only talking about the "convential" route to education. There are ICS courses and home learning and so forth.

wheelchairman
12-09-2005, 06:31 AM
Reputation of the college/University you go to has a big influence on a lot of things over here. For example, when applying for a job. And most of the schools with excellent reputations (Oxford and Camebridge being the obvious ones) require disastrously high grades to even apply.

It's the same with college - the less of a reputation the college has, the easier it is to get into. The trend tends to be that the easier the college is to get into, the harder it is to get any kind of decent grade - be that because of the students, teachers, whatever.

Obviously I'm only talking about the "convential" route to education. There are ICS courses and home learning and so forth.
Of course, purely materialistically there are obvious consequences. But I am saying the differences are so lacking it's almost pointless to care. If a person's happiness is contingent on getting a certain job, then a person will never achieve happiness. You can't define yourself as your job, that's a surefire path to self-loathing, abjegation and alienation.

For example when it comes to applying for a job, it depends how far you go into your education. If you stop at bachelor's then perhaps your university degree will matter greatly, I don't know. If you stop at your Master's then you will have a very specific qualification you qualify for jobs which you won't have a lot of competition for. And obviously the further you go, doctorate, the less competition.

However, purely on a quality of life level, nothing will change by going to a different university. You will live your life with the same level of contentment no matter what you do. It just simply doesn't matter. It's about how a person deals with their life.

TheUnholyNightbringer
12-09-2005, 06:34 AM
It all depends if that person has a set goal in life. True, a lot of people go through life never really knowing what they want to do, and as a result can be content in pretty much any job, as long as they feel they're being challenged on some level.

But say someone's pushing for a specific job, any job. If they don't make the grade on the levels underneath it (high school, say) they won't easily be able to jump to the next level and so get the qualifications they need.

You're right though, qualifications do mean less these days as opposed to experience and so forth. I'm just a bit peeved at this thread because I enjoy education. *shrug*

wheelchairman
12-09-2005, 06:39 AM
It all depends if that person has a set goal in life. True, a lot of people go through life never really knowing what they want to do, and as a result can be content in pretty much any job, as long as they feel they're being challenged on some level.

But say someone's pushing for a specific job, any job. If they don't make the grade on the levels underneath it (high school, say) they won't easily be able to jump to the next level and so get the qualifications they need.

You're right though, qualifications do mean less these days as opposed to experience and so forth. I'm just a bit peeved at this thread because I enjoy education. *shrug*
But people who are pushing for specific jobs, are often raised to push for these specific jobs. Then they turn 20 and realize that maybe they don't really want to do it, but are already committed to that specific education. I pity anyone who thinks they know what they want to do at an early age. However this person will probably not be entirely happy doing that job unless they pushed for it entirely of their own volition. Which I would say is extremely rare. I would go as far as saying I don't believe it happens. And that those who claim it are lying to justify wasting their youth.

Jobs are jobs. I don't know. I have a hard time relating to them since I don't want to do them. Sometimes I'm tempted just settling for some crappy office job or handyman job at some point instead of studying, simply because I don't want to try at times. Experience is more important for jobs that require students. But if you are studying for a specific career, then you are pretty fucked since chances are your job will be outsourced eventually or become redundant. Or there will simply be no demand for the services you were educated with.

I'm not saying education is worthless. I'm saying that the only reason, goal and purpose of studying, should be for the pure enjoyment of studying. And High School is simply the forced rembrance of various general facts. If you like it, that's good.

TheUnholyNightbringer
12-09-2005, 06:45 AM
Sure, one of the most important parts of further education is the enjoyment of it. I think that's the point. In a certain field, knowing you have the proper tools for the job (ie the specific knowledge) makes the job far more enjoyable, because it's more do-able, as it were.

wheelchairman
12-09-2005, 06:46 AM
Well that's my point, High-school is utterly redundant.

TheUnholyNightbringer
12-09-2005, 06:51 AM
Hmm. I think I just talked myself into a circle.

Italia311
12-09-2005, 07:06 AM
Highschool is pointless. I was suspended from highschool a few times, didnt do shit, I just hung out.

Community college, practicly everyone gets into them unless you don't have a high school diploma. I did really well in college cause it actually ment something to me. When I graduated I applied to university.

Now Im in University.

I don't believe in University or College getting you a good job unless of course you go to med school or something of that nature. Even then, you need community service hours, you have to be involved. Your personal life is just as important as your school. All school does, is prepare you for work. There are no guarantee's.

I wouldn't encourage anyone do quit trying in school whether its highschool or not. It will eventually do some good.