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View Full Version : So you've read Fight Club?



wheelchairman
02-23-2006, 05:59 PM
Pretty much everyone has read the book, seen the film, and claims that it changed their lives much in the same way that they claimed the song Smash did too. And as a person who really liked Fight Club, who is actually from Oregon (in my mind this is relevant, but who knows, you might disagree), and who thought it contributed something to my line of thinking, I find you people annoying. You simply just annoy me.

And you tend to not read his other books. I don't know why, perhaps you like Fight Club because you can hear Edward Norton's voice while reading it, or whatever. But let's discuss his other works. Anyone read Invisible Monsters?

HornyPope
02-23-2006, 06:01 PM
Not my style one bit.

I'm much more fascinated by traditional schools of thought that may or may not even apply to today's world in the extent they were formulated once. And I haven't even read the book. Just the whole idea of getting to it doesn't appeal to me.

Paint_It_Black
02-23-2006, 06:13 PM
I haven't read it, or indeed any of his books. One day I might, but I doubt I'd start with Fight Club. I hate seeing a movie then reading the book, because the book is inevitably better and just spoiled by knowing the plot already. Of course, reading the book and then seeing the movie is usally disappointing too.

HornyPope
02-23-2006, 06:21 PM
I don't get how people are "dissapointed" by movies at all. I hold the movie in such a low esteem I don't one bit care for what I see beyond the entertainment value of the 90 minutes I spent--and even there i'm willing to compromise.

Then again I genuinly loved Donnie Darko for what it stood for.

Not Ozymandias
02-23-2006, 06:24 PM
Loved Invisible Monsters. It was about as substantial as a fart in a hurricane, but it was so entertaining that it didn't matter.
Choke was a really good book too, as good as Fight Club in my opinion, but I'm biased because I can personally relate to more of it than I can with FC.


I either do not care for or strongly dislike the rest of his work.

Paint_It_Black
02-23-2006, 06:27 PM
I don't get how people are "dissapointed" by movies at all.
Because I occasionally let myself get excited, thinking "this one will be different". And very rarely it is different.

wheelchairman
02-23-2006, 06:43 PM
Choke looked good, I didn't get it because I was buying used books and didn't want to pay for New Book prices.

The one about Portland Oregon (called Refugees and something else) sounds good.

Substantially it was sort of like Fight Club. You got to hit rock bottom motif. Otherwise it was just entertaining.

Mota Boy
02-23-2006, 06:53 PM
And as a person who really liked Fight Club, who is actually from Oregon (in my mind this is relevant, but who knows, you might disagree), and who thought it contributed something to my line of thinking, I find you people annoying. You simply just annoy me.
Hey, don't get all indie on me.

(Read Fight Club, remember thinking that it was OK. Loved the movie when it first came out, but haven't seen it in years.)

Nicole
02-23-2006, 07:03 PM
I loved Invisible Monsters, but Choke is definately the best one he's written. The stories of the crazy sex addicts were greatly amusing, and the guy who went crazy collecting the rocks to build his own church. I definately need to read his other books but I need to put a good amount of space inbetween reading them because they have rather similar ideas, just expressed completely differently. Kind of like how I have to put a good amount of time in between reading the same fantasy series or irvine welsh books, it does become a little repetitive.

nieh
02-23-2006, 08:02 PM
I haven't read it, or indeed any of his books. One day I might, but I doubt I'd start with Fight Club. I hate seeing a movie then reading the book, because the book is inevitably better and just spoiled by knowing the plot already. Of course, reading the book and then seeing the movie is usally disappointing too.

Actually, Fight Club is the only movie I can think of that's generally regarded as being better than the book. I've never read the book myself so I can't say for sure, but everyone I know says the movie was actually better.

BREAK
02-23-2006, 08:28 PM
Actually, Fight Club is the only movie I can think of that's generally regarded as being better than the book.

Last of the Mohicans, anyone?

lenar
02-23-2006, 09:08 PM
I loved Invisible Monsters. My favorite of his though is Survivor. I bought Haunted awhile back but I have not gotten around to reading it yet.

Paint_It_Black
02-23-2006, 10:31 PM
everyone I know says the movie was actually better.

Lots of people I know think movies are always better. But maybe you know better people.

Tizzalicious
02-23-2006, 11:10 PM
I need to read more of them. You buy, I borrow, k?

Not Ozymandias
02-23-2006, 11:13 PM
Actually, Fight Club is the only movie I can think of that's generally regarded as being better than the book. I've never read the book myself so I can't say for sure, but everyone I know says the movie was actually better.
Those people are called "crack-heads".

Jaws and the Godfather were much, much better than their books.

Andy
02-23-2006, 11:35 PM
Jaws and the Godfather were much, much better than their books.
Add the Shawshank Redemption onto that list as well

On Fight Club: I keep meaning to buy more of his stuff (won't even attempt to spell his name, let's just call him Chuck) but never get around to it. I read Fight Club and adored it, it didn't have a particularily profound effect on my life, or make me think of things differently. It was just entertaining in the few hours it took to read. It really should be longer.

XYlophonetreeZ
02-23-2006, 11:51 PM
Add Mystic River. And, for that matter, most of the movies that are based on bestselling books in the past 10 years that are not called Harry Potter.

Sin Studly
02-23-2006, 11:57 PM
The Mystic River book was better.

Personally (call me a heathen) I always preferred the Mice and Men movie to the book.

Andy
02-23-2006, 11:59 PM
Personally (call me a heathen) I always preferred the Mice and Men movie to the book.
Heathen. But from what I remember, wasn't the film and the book especially close-knit?

T-6005
02-24-2006, 12:14 AM
Anyone read Invisible Monsters?
I've read it. Quite liked it. I've never read Fight Club because I might eventually have to talk to the average dimwit who thinks that it's a life-changing title about it, and allow them to ramble on for a half hour about completely pointless aspects of the book. I'm considering Choke, though - someone talked about it the other day in a rather intriguing manner.

XYlophonetreeZ
02-24-2006, 12:22 AM
The Mystic River book was better.
Ewwww. Ew ew ew. The writing style bugged the hell out of me, and it alternately made me cringe or laugh.

"Brendan was leaving this house tomorrow morning, leaving his mother, walking out that shabby door and down those cracked steps, up the great wide street with cars double-parked all over the place and everyone sitting on the stoops, walking out like he was in a goddamned Springsteen song, and not the Nebraska-Ghost-of-Tom-Joad Springsteen, but the Born-to-Run-Two-Hearts-Are-Better-Than-One-Rosalita-(Won't-You-Come-Out-Tonight) Bruce, the anthem Bruce. Yeah, an anthem; that's what he'd be as he walked right down the middle of the asphalt whether bumpers rode the backs of his legs and horns honked, going right up that street and into the heart of Buckingham to take his Katie's hand"

It was occasionally entertaining, but there were far too much foreshadowing and obvious attempts at symbolism and too many overlong references to pop culture.


Personally (call me a heathen) I always preferred the Mice and Men movie to the book.
I liked the movie a lot too, but I'll still give the slight edge to the book. How can you go wrong with Gary Sinise and John Malkovich (as a retard)?

Vera
02-24-2006, 02:12 AM
I actually don't even get how FC could "change one's life". I know that the film is a favourite of mine and that when I read the book (and Choke and Lullaby and I've only read 10 pages of Invisible Monsters because my friend borrowed the book & lost it) I really enjoyed Chuck Palahniuk's writing style and it probably influenced my own writing, in a way.

Per, you mention Oregon, I suppose in reference that Palahniuk is also from Oregon? Does it influence his writing or his view of the world, in your mind?

Sin Studly
02-24-2006, 02:52 AM
I liked the movie a lot too, but I'll still give the slight edge to the book. How can you go wrong with Gary Sinise and John Malkovich (as a retard)?

In the movie the extreme actions of Sinese are sudden and unexpected, the book gives away what's going to happen too soon. They're both great, but I'd reccomend to anyone who hasn't seen/read Of Mice and Men to watch the movie first.

killer_queen
02-24-2006, 02:55 AM
Fight Club changed my life although I didn't even read it. Two years ago I started to go out with a person I really care about. That week he and his friends started to read it and watched the movie. Then that cute, great person turned into an idiot who caueses little fires in the classroom. He stopped caring everything and I kinda lost him.

Tizzalicious
02-24-2006, 03:27 AM
Some people are morons.

Tomo
02-24-2006, 04:20 AM
Fight Club is my most favourite movie of all times. I would like to read the book, but in my country it's impossible to get it. Just like H. P. Lovecraft's books. I guess I'm the only horror fan, who had never read Necronomicon and The Call of Cthulhu. :(

the_GoDdEsS
02-24-2006, 04:24 AM
It's hard to get the modern stuff in the Slovak libraries because they're full of oldbooks. It's annoying. You could order it but blowing money on books isn't always fun. Besides, I think you can borrow from international libraries through ours. So there's still a chance.

the_offsprings_monkey
02-24-2006, 04:31 AM
My girlfriend is reading that atm, I might check it out.

killer_queen
02-24-2006, 04:53 AM
My girlfriend is reading that atm, I might check it out.
Could you be more pathetic? There are better ways to tell everyone that you have a girlfriend. Also it won't help you to make people respect you.

JoY
02-24-2006, 05:02 AM
it sounds like I should get myself some books, because what Nicky said about Choke sounds just great & like something I could fall in love with.

Paint_It_Black
02-24-2006, 05:47 AM
The Mystic River book was better.


The book made me care a little more about the characters. The movie was well acted, but I just didn't like anyone. I'm not particularly fond of the book or the movie.

kamikaze
02-24-2006, 06:04 AM
I haven't read Invisible Monsters yet. And I can't read Fight Club until I forget a lot of the movie. I have all of Chuck's books (the first ones - Lullaby & Diary - were bought in Portland) except for 2. Lullaby is probably my favorite book of all time. Choke and Survivor were also great books. Survivor took me a while to get into, but it was worth it. And I still haven't been able to get into Diary. Have you read it?

BREAK
02-24-2006, 10:23 AM
Jaws and the Godfather were much, much better than their books.

Word up, and let's not even mention Blade Runner or The Manchurian Candidate.

Josh doesn't read books though, so we should forgive him.

sKratch
02-24-2006, 10:28 AM
Anyone who says Fight Club changed their life, in my books (lolpun), hasn't read enough.
That being said, I enjoyed the book. Like others have said, Choke was probably my favorite out of all the books I've read by him. I've also read Invisible Monsters and Survivor. His books are very entertaining, but I think Palahnuik is a bit of a weak author because most of his books that I've read are very, very similar. Not only in a sense of style, but the characters in them, the situations, etc.
I can't figure out why, but I hate the way I wrote this post. There's something retarded about my sentences. Sorry.

XYlophonetreeZ
02-24-2006, 10:30 AM
Add Mystic River. And, for that matter, most of the movies that are based on bestselling books in the past 10 years that are not called Harry Potter.
*I need an asterisk to add that all Michael Crichton movies are also naturally excluded from this rule. Not that I particularly give a damn about his books either.

And I agree about Last of the Mohicans, Break. James Fenimore Cooper was pretty much the worst writer who ever lived.

Paint_It_Black
02-24-2006, 10:32 AM
Not that I particularly give a damn about his books either.

I've found most of his books quite enjoyable for a fast, easy, yet still entertaining read.

XYlophonetreeZ
02-24-2006, 10:33 AM
Well I've only read Jurassic Park and Timeline. I sort of enjoyed the former, but thought the latter was crap.

Paint_It_Black
02-24-2006, 10:38 AM
I mostly enjoyed Timeline. Although it began to lose my interest after a while. If you didn't enjoy the book, don't ever watch the immensely terrible movie they turned it into. Same thing with Congo.

Sin Studly
02-24-2006, 10:52 AM
The book made me care a little more about the characters. The movie was well acted, but I just didn't like anyone. I'm not particularly fond of the book or the movie.

I liked the paedo and the gangster. The cop annoyed me.

Paint_It_Black
02-24-2006, 11:08 AM
I liked the paedo and the gangster. The cop annoyed me.

Same here, funnily enough.

wheelchairman
02-24-2006, 12:12 PM
sKratch makes a valid point, they are very similar. But I think that's true of many authors perhaps. but yeah all his female characters could be Marla Singer for as much as it matters. I don't know how much Fight Club changed my perception. But I could relate to a lot of what it said. Self-improvement is masturbation is a great line because it's so true. And the rock/bottom motif is just interesting in my opinion.

In Invisible Monsters I loved the quote that went along the lines like "Gameshows were invented so that people would feel better about the worthless knowledge they retained from High School."

Betty
02-25-2006, 03:19 AM
I agree with the life changing thing seeming a bit silly, but really it all comes down to at one point in your life one watches a movie/reads a book.

I watched Fight Club years after the fact, and after hearing all the hype, I enjoyed the movie a bunch but was kinda like "meh, overhyped" afterwards. Same with Donnie Darko. Which is not to say I always think that about overhyped movies that I watch way too late. I FELL IN LOVE with both American Beauty and Pulp Fiction when I finally got around to watching them.

Anyways, back to life changing, I'd say the book that most changed my perception on life was definitely "L'Etranger". Hardcore. If I read it now, guaranteed it would not have had the same effect.

wheelchairman
02-25-2006, 11:04 AM
I watched Donnie Darko. It was alright. It was extremely annoying in the way that nothing was explained. I never like that about films. (if there are gaping unexplainable and unrealistic things in what ordinarily is a movie based on events that could be real.) Otherwise it was funny.

I just saw Pulp Fiction for the first time last week. It was good. I watched it because some people I with enjoyed Boondock Saints and said Pulp Fiction was kinda the same.

I enjoyed Boondock Saints more.

Hype usually makes things worse. Not because you hate the work, but because you hate the people who like it. Like I'm sure Apple Computers aren't godawful pieces of junk. But there users are (NOT all of them, I'm speaking strictly of the ones who are vocal about how great macs are.) The same goes for Firefox, I mean fuck. (And I use firefox, that doesn't change the fact taht it's users are annoying.)

Tizzalicious
02-25-2006, 11:36 AM
I still don't know where I know that guy from Donnie Darko from. It's annoying.

Betty
02-25-2006, 12:51 PM
??

He was in Brokeback Mountain... that was fun.

Tizzalicious
02-25-2006, 12:55 PM
I didn't see that...

I really don't know where I saw him. It's annoying.

wheelchairman
02-25-2006, 12:56 PM
I didn't see that...

I really don't know where I saw him. It's annoying.
Fucking look it up on wikipedia then, jeez!

Tizzalicious
02-25-2006, 12:57 PM
Fucking look it up on wikipedia then, jeez!

I think I will!

Vera
02-25-2006, 02:15 PM
Hype fucking sucks. I love Fight Club but then there are those other million people who also love it and I'm not sure if it's actually worth all that love.

Basically, though, what I've learned is that film appreciation has more to do with how the film appeals to people than how good it is. Naturally if it's a quality film, it's going to appeal to more people, but there are bad films that just have some magical appeal which make people love them.

Like say, Star Wars. Not the best film ever, the first film (meaning original film) is actually largely crap, but it just appeals to a huge crowd and people grew up with it etc etc.

Then there are the good films that are good and you can recognize that but it doesn't change the fact they don't appeal to you. You don't want to watch them again, you don't care for the characters. Good films, but not appealing enough. It's a totally subjective thing, of course. Eternal Sunshine was such a film for me.

So yeah, if I recommend Fight Club, I will never say "it's the best movie/book ever!!" because that a) isn't true and b) would lead them to just be disappointed.

HornyPope
02-25-2006, 02:21 PM
Anyways, back to life changing, I'd say the book that most changed my perception on life was definitely "L'Etranger". Hardcore. If I read it now, guaranteed it would not have had the same effect.

Ditto, at least as far as teenagehood goes. I'm afraid to re-read it since.

BREAK
02-26-2006, 12:09 AM
I enjoyed Boondock Saints more.



Like say, Star Wars. Not the best film ever, the first film (meaning original film) is actually largely crap

Based on the above, both of you need to refrain from expressing your opinions on movies from now until time ends.

Paint_It_Black
02-26-2006, 12:25 AM
I enjoyed Boondock Saints more.

I like that movie. A lot.

Sin Studly
02-26-2006, 12:27 AM
Based on the above, both of you need to refrain from expressing your opinions on movies from now until time ends.

First time I agree with Break on taste-related subjects.

Apathy
02-26-2006, 12:48 AM
I love the movie Fight Club, i have not actuall read the book. It has not changed my life. It was just very entertaining. People who are obsessed with forms of media usually are whackos.

Vera
02-27-2006, 12:49 PM
Based on the above, both of you need to refrain from expressing your opinions on movies from now until time ends.
There are no WRONG opinions on movies, there are only opinions not as good as mine.

It's okay, BREAK. I forgive you.

Justin, I will cut your balls off if I ever get to meet you. Not for myself, but for Betty.

BREAK
02-27-2006, 05:40 PM
It's perfectly fine with me if you want to have wrong opinions, but expressing them is the worst thing you can do. Why do people even bother talking about movies if they're not going to agree with me on everything?