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View Full Version : How Piracy Opens Doors for Windows



HornyPope
04-13-2006, 07:10 AM
"The proliferation of pirated copies nevertheless establishes Microsoft products particularly Windows and Office as the software standard. As economies mature and flourish and people and companies begin buying legitimate versions, they usually buy Microsoft because most others already use it. It's called the network effect."
(....)
"Although about 3 million computers get sold every year in China [circa 1998], people don't pay for the software. Someday they will, though," Gates told an audience at the University of Washington. "And as long as they're going to steal it, we want them to steal ours. They'll get sort of addicted, and then we'll somehow figure out how to collect sometime in the next decade."

article (http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-micropiracy9apr09,0,414067.story?page=1)


I'm just fascinated at the scheme. Brilliant. Fifteen years from now, 100 million legit firms in Asia, pressured by international standards, will buy their copy of windows, and Microsoft will collect big bucks.

notoriousdoc
04-13-2006, 07:20 AM
ANYTHING could happen and Microsoft would make money out of it.

I happily declare I'm using a pirated copy of office.

platinumpt
04-13-2006, 07:27 AM
I don't think a sane person would buy a legal copy of Microsoft Office, or any other Microsoft software. Microsoft earns their money by selling the licences to corporate companies, not to common users like you and me.

HornyPope
04-13-2006, 07:31 AM
Not necessarily corporate. You two are young and use your copies for pleasures, as do I, but if we formed a respectable firm and stocked up in thousands of dollars in equipement, what's several hundred dollars more to keep the operations fully legit?

platinumpt
04-13-2006, 07:39 AM
Yes, you said it all. I'd just like to add that there's much more piracy-control over companies than over common users (which sorta makes sense)... when you own a big company, you just can't take the chance of using pirated software, or you might lose much more money than you would spend by aquiring it legally, don't you think?

The entire "addiction" theory Gates is talking about is, indeed brilliant, as long as they can implement successfully those "means" he's talking about, in a near future, to nullify software piracy.

wheelchairman
04-13-2006, 07:54 AM
I worked in a small enterprise over a month ago. There are obvious reasons to using legit copies. That being, you don't have to worry about the costs of a lawsuit.

notoriousdoc
04-13-2006, 08:09 AM
If I started something corporate I'd probably use Open Office instead.

platinumpt
04-13-2006, 08:12 AM
Yes, I've only mentioned corporate and big companies, but we can extrapolate it to enterprises in general. It's safer to be legit.

wheelchairman
04-13-2006, 10:24 AM
If I started something corporate I'd probably use Open Office instead.
But that's lost money right there, you might know how to use it, but then you'd have to train everyone you hire in how to use it. Microsoft software however, is used everywhere, so everyone who's ever had an office job before, would be familiar with it.

Endymion
04-13-2006, 10:31 AM
But that's lost money right there, you might know how to use it, but then you'd have to train everyone you hire in how to use it. Microsoft software however, is used everywhere, so everyone who's ever had an office job before, would be familiar with it.
retraining? openoffice is about as different from the latest version of ms office as a copy of ms office from four or five years ago.

i've heard that whole thing with piracy before, but i'm very surprised that gates himself actually came out and said it.

wheelchairman
04-13-2006, 10:38 AM
And software is difficult to use under any circumstance when it's new. I'm not particularly n000bish. But it took me about a week to get a good grasp on MS Frontpage. And that is just one part of the package. One week is a lot of wages.

Endymion
04-13-2006, 10:40 AM
yeah, but had you used a similar wysiwyg html editor in the past? if the employee had never used an office suite before, sure, a couple weeks to get a grasp on things, but msoffice->openoffice is going from one office suite to a fairly similar office suite not exactly diving in head first.

forcyn
04-13-2006, 10:41 AM
I really hate Winshit... eee Windows and only reason I'm using it is that Internet doest't work under Linux [no drivers... :/ windows only]

I don't remember when I last used Office... I always use OpenOffice. no differences between them.

oh, Gastes have stolen the idea of using windows from Sun [if I'm not wrong], haven't he?

Endymion
04-13-2006, 10:45 AM
I really hate Winshit... eee Windows and only reason I'm using it is that Internet doest't work under Linux [no drivers... :/ windows only]
when did you last try? pretty much everything works currently, at the worst through ndiswrapper for some wireless cards.

oh, Gastes have stolen the idea of using windows from Sun [if I'm not wrong], haven't he?
no? the modern gui (pointer, windows, etc) was developed at PARC, a research division of Xerox.

wheelchairman
04-13-2006, 10:45 AM
yeah, but had you used a similar wysiwyg html editor in the past? if the employee had never used an office suite before, sure, a couple weeks to get a grasp on things, but msoffice->openoffice is going from one office suite to a fairly similar office suite not exactly diving in head first.
Yeah I had used the one on Freewebs before. Alternately I had had a few classes in FrontPage a couple years before that.

Someone would make more money than Bill Gates if they could explain his software better than the paperclip can.

forcyn
04-13-2006, 10:49 AM
when did you last try? pretty much everything works currently, at the worst through ndiswrapper for some wireless cards.


not mine :/ my D-link is "windows only"... :/

Endymion
04-13-2006, 10:59 AM
so is my netgear, but there's still a driver for it in the kernel.

to see if it's supported somehow, check for your card here (http://linux-wless.passys.nl/query_part.php?brandname=D-Link&zoek=Show).

also, check out http://ndiswrapper.sourceforge.net/

Paint_It_Black
04-13-2006, 01:36 PM
I don't think a sane person would buy a legal copy of Microsoft Office

I guess I'm insane then.

HornyPope
04-13-2006, 06:53 PM
The retraining isn't even as much of a factor. The scheme consists of creating default market standards under which the companies function so that the next decade automatically presupposes Microsoft products as the ultimate solution -- no matter the price.

With the Asian and Eastern European markets growing and adopting international standards it spells a lot of sales for the future. Granted, freesource and some smaller companies may succeed in taking over a chunk of market share, but Microsoft will, by far, remain the dominant software provider due to people's habits.