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endlesst0m
04-25-2006, 03:19 PM
Nowadays, it seems The Offspring doesn't really have a huge following like they used to have in thier glory days (The Smash-Ixnay era).

For some reason, I'm curious as to what it was like to be an Offspring fan during those days. What kind of people mostly listened to thier music? Were you likely to be stereotyped somehow, if you were wearing an Offspring shirt? Was The Offspring popular with everyone, or mostly just punks and outcasts? Did the "Tru Punx" reject them for having hit singles? What kind of people were at an Offspring show?

If I could simplify this in any way, I would say that it seems like certain bands are typically associated with certain lifestyles. For example: Goth=Marylin Manson...Grunge=Nirvana. Was The Offspring involved in this kind of classification in the Mid 90's?

How did people generally view The Offspring and thier fans during this time?

Note: I know I'm dealing with immature stereotypes here, so you don't need to post and point that out. I'm just curious for some reason.

BIG Nicky
04-25-2006, 04:53 PM
I'd like to know as well, any Smash era fans on the forum? :cool:

Jakebert
04-25-2006, 05:00 PM
I'd assume that they weren't really well liked by the tru punx when they first got big. Tru punx hate everything that's popular. Plus, I'm sure when they went to Columbia, that got a lot of negative responses from those same kids.

-=Xander=-
04-26-2006, 04:34 AM
Oh yeah...

I used to follow them to every concert. Those where the days. You didnt have to be a certain thing "grunge or goth" You just had to be ready for a insane mosh pit and lots of drinking...

;)


Obviously I'm lying... But I'm curious too...

Venom Symbiote
04-26-2006, 06:29 AM
I'm not from the Smash days, I first got into them when Ixnay first came on the radio, by that time they were already seen as "sellouts" or whatever by all these "true punks" you speak about.

So I guess in that respect not a lot was different.

However, one thing I've noticed is, the fans tended to be older. You didn't really get 12 or 13 year olds going out and buying Ixnay on the Hombre. Of course I'm generalising here, there are exceptions, but for the most part it wasn't a big thing.

"Gone Away" was a really big single in terms of the mainstream market, but I guess if you're used to the "Pretty Fly" or "Why Don't You Get Job" airplay coverage it was nothing in comparison to that.

I think I bought Ixnay on tape to start with as an 11 year old (after being referred to it by a teenage neighbour when we heard "The Meaning of Life" and "Change The World" on the radio as a promo the first week it came out), not having my own CD player at the time. I guess my memories of the band at that time in the media was a little different to how they're portrayed now, they were still kind of seen as an "edgy" group, the videoclips still being low-budget and purposely moody and all.

So meh. This was all around the time Green Day had Nimrod out (I think that was a few months later, don't quote me on it though) and The Living End were first finding their footing in Australia, so they were the obvious comparisons (at least here) around then.

Come to think of it, Green Day had an older demographic audience at the time too, from memory. I just can't really remember many people under, say, 15 or 16 liking them.

I'm not so much complaining about it, but watching the Complete Music Video Collection DVD just had me notice the age more than anything. Even with the Americana clips there the audience seems a little more "rough" and "weathered", concert-experienced, whereas all the more recent indoor performances are frequented by these ultra-clean-cut bubblegum kids no older than eighth grade.

Not necessarily a bad thing, just an observation.

I think with Smash it would have been another step up in age from Ixnay, too. I can't picture the moshpits back then being too...child-friendly.

-=Xander=-
04-26-2006, 08:13 AM
Hmm that was good. I was only a little tacker back then... like 7 but I remember what it was like here in (australia) Because of the living end there was so much hype about "Punk" or atleast I thought so... I used to sit in front of the TV every weekend and wait for The Offspring to come on from when I was 5 (and smash came out) till now :p

But now, I really wanna find out about Smash generation and pre-smash! :eek:

Something else just occured to me...

In footage I seen of older concerts its (like you said) a little more intense then the mosh pits of today. What do you think is the reason for that? I mean if you went to a Limpbizket or Linkin Park (even Greenday -to stay in the punk genre) concert its a 40 times hard mosh pit then ANY offpsring concert and they are all young kids

Why has The Offsprings mosh pits become kind of "mellow"?? Is the band that has changed or is the fans? :confused: (sorry for not making sense, it works in my mind)

Venom Symbiote
04-26-2006, 08:37 AM
I think it's just the more "radio friendly" songs being released, again, not that I really have anything against that.

Sure, they still release rockin' tracks like "Can't Repeat" and "(Can't Get My) Head Around You", but they just don't have that same potentially-offensive "bite" that the band used to have. Again, not a bad thing, but you can't really expect kids that are younger than the group's audience used to be who have grown up with "Hit That" and "(Can't Get My) Head Around You" to rock out to songs as much as we used to (being older at the time) with "All I Want" and "Self Esteem".

It's just the nature of the beast, I guess. Changing times. And moshing in my honest opinion is pretty-much outdated and archaic these days, it doesn't have the same cultural presence as it used to 10 years ago, it's kind of unrelevant and unnecessary. Unlike in the Nirvana/Pearl Jam/Pumpkins era, when it was basically a staple of rock music.

Demon_of_Debauchery
04-26-2006, 10:10 AM
I can remember listening to The Offspring when Smash came out because my brothers used to listen to them and I liked it but as I was only 4 I didn't know much about the "Tru Punx" or "sellout" bands.

ePidemic
04-26-2006, 07:49 PM
1st post :)

What Iíve wondered is what if they were barely starting off now in 2006 and released their self titled album "Offspring" - the one from 1990. Would people catch on now, or was it easier for them in the 90ís

Llamas
04-26-2006, 08:13 PM
I'm not from the Smash days, I first got into them when Ixnay first came on the radio, by that time they were already seen as "sellouts" or whatever by all these "true punks" you speak about.

So I guess in that respect not a lot was different.

However, one thing I've noticed is, the fans tended to be older. You didn't really get 12 or 13 year olds going out and buying Ixnay on the Hombre. Of course I'm generalising here, there are exceptions, but for the most part it wasn't a big thing.

"Gone Away" was a really big single in terms of the mainstream market, but I guess if you're used to the "Pretty Fly" or "Why Don't You Get Job" airplay coverage it was nothing in comparison to that.

I think I bought Ixnay on tape to start with as an 11 year old (after being referred to it by a teenage neighbour when we heard "The Meaning of Life" and "Change The World" on the radio as a promo the first week it came out), not having my own CD player at the time. I guess my memories of the band at that time in the media was a little different to how they're portrayed now, they were still kind of seen as an "edgy" group, the videoclips still being low-budget and purposely moody and all.

So meh. This was all around the time Green Day had Nimrod out (I think that was a few months later, don't quote me on it though) and The Living End were first finding their footing in Australia, so they were the obvious comparisons (at least here) around then.

Come to think of it, Green Day had an older demographic audience at the time too, from memory. I just can't really remember many people under, say, 15 or 16 liking them.

I'm not so much complaining about it, but watching the Complete Music Video Collection DVD just had me notice the age more than anything. Even with the Americana clips there the audience seems a little more "rough" and "weathered", concert-experienced, whereas all the more recent indoor performances are frequented by these ultra-clean-cut bubblegum kids no older than eighth grade.

Not necessarily a bad thing, just an observation.

I think with Smash it would have been another step up in age from Ixnay, too. I can't picture the moshpits back then being too...child-friendly.


I think part of the reason that it was older people then and younger people now is because radio keep targeting younger and younger kids for the fashion trends. In the 90s, audiences were getting older, but they were still typically late highschool/early college. now I'm hearing 8 year olds love 50 cent and shit. back in the 60s, kids didn't listen to the radio unless they were around their parents listening to it.

-=Xander=-
04-26-2006, 09:18 PM
1st post :)

What Iíve wondered is what if they were barely starting off now in 2006 and released their self titled album "Offspring" - the one from 1990. Would people catch on now, or was it easier for them in the 90ís

You have a good point. I think it was definately easier for the Offspring to get a start in the 90s. I mean that was the age of punk/rock (not emo!) These days people wouldnt stand for The Offsprings attitude very well if they were new. I mean Dexter can be overly sarcastic and aragont (sp?). In order for the offspring to do a half decent job these days they'd have to sellout and wear eyeliner or have chicks practically naked dacing around them. :) (even more so then Pretty fly for a white guy)

oh and Happy first post