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Vera
07-06-2006, 01:57 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060705/ap_on_re_us/simpl_wurdz

Excerpt:


Those in favor of simplified spelling say children would learn faster and illiteracy rates would drop. Opponents say a new system would make spelling even more confusing.

Eether wae, the consept has yet to capcher th publix imajinaeshun.

It's been 100 years since Andrew Carnegie helped create the Simplified Spelling Board to promote a retooling of written English and President Theodore Roosevelt tried to force the government to use simplified spelling in its publications. But advocates aren't giving up.

They even picket the national spelling bee finals, held every year in Washington, costumed as bumble bees and hoisting signs that say "Enuf is enuf but enough is too much" or "I'm thru with through."

Thae sae th bee selebraets th ability of a fue stoodents to master a dificult sistem that stumps meny utherz hoo cuud do just as wel if speling were simpler.

wot du u fink?

Sinister
07-06-2006, 01:58 PM
wahs teh fcuk r dey on ?

0r4ng3
07-06-2006, 02:01 PM
That's stoopid.

Edit: Oh crap, 3 makes the bandwagon.

Sunny
07-06-2006, 02:06 PM
aw, come the fuck on, if foreigners can learn english in a few years (including spelling of "difficult" words), AMERICAN kids can too.

unless they're, well, retarded. or dyslexic, in which case they get a break anyway.

wheelchairman
07-06-2006, 02:15 PM
I doubt there is a lot of support for this.

Sunny
07-06-2006, 02:21 PM
i wonder what the response would be if the same concept was being promoted in the UK.

>_>

wheelchairman
07-06-2006, 02:22 PM
We need Tizz to quote her England-Study Book.

"Most British students, when they try are able to write something similar to proper English."

Tizzalicious
07-06-2006, 10:32 PM
That's almost exactly what it said. Written by someone from England too. Self-pwn much?

We changed the Dutch spelling rules a little here over time, but I can't say it made it much easier. They changed something, and then made sure there were 13213214 exceptions. Way to make things even more complicated.

Mota Boy
07-06-2006, 11:07 PM
I'm glad as hell that the Communists simplified Chinese characters. Otherwise learning them would be even more difficult. However, the idea of simplifying English rules is absolutely idiotic.

Unlike other languages (at least, like Spanish), we don't have only a few unchanging vowel sounds. Just look at a dictionary's pronunciation scheme to understand how many different tricks each vowel can pull. So it's not like you can easily simplify. You have to pull your own array of linguistic acrobatics to work the myriad vowel sounds of this language down into five vowels (and, as demonstrated above, sometimes "y"). Plus, English isn't that incredibly difficult to learn, and misspelling isn't that grave an issue.

Though one of the intersting little puzzles I like about the English language is asking "How do you pronounce 'ghoti'?" The answer is, of course, "fish". You take the "gh" from "enough", the "o" from "women" and the "ti" from "nation" and you put them together to make "ghoti". Quite simple really.

WebDudette
07-06-2006, 11:12 PM
In all seriousness if I had to read a book that had words spelt like that I would get a headache.

It's also harder for me to comprehend. I think it is a terrible idea.

Vera
07-06-2006, 11:26 PM
In Finnish we only have one letter for one sound (with a couple of exceptions) and yes, would be more simple if English was like that but Finnish has been systematically developed like that and changing a language that people mostly just spoke, didn't write, is easier than changing a worldwide language millions of people speak and know (and know how to spell).

And even if you only did that in America..

I'm glad they article showed how retarded it looks like. It's literally incomprehensible to most people who know English.

Izie
07-07-2006, 01:57 AM
*twitches*

That article hurts. Tizz's English book makes up for it though, baha <33

PS Serbian is fuckeasy to spell, like Finnish, without the exceptions even - one sound - one letter. Reformed in the 19th century, HOOZAH. We win. If you ignore the fact that proper Serbian is nearly impossible to learn (unless you're a Slav of some sort).

Vera
07-07-2006, 02:48 PM
Yeah, but you got a fuckload of special letters.

Nevermind, Finnish also has some. , basically. Most foreigners pronounce them as a and o even though they've lived in Finland for ages..

Izie
07-07-2006, 02:56 PM
*shrug* We got 30 letters in our alphabet, it's really not THAT bad :p

Sin Studly
07-07-2006, 07:39 PM
i wonder what the response would be if the same concept was being promoted in the UK.

I was under the impression the British were already using such a scheme.

Rocky-girl
07-08-2006, 02:37 AM
I don't think that English is so hard language as to make it simpler.

Sometimes while reading English books I think why don't they put in their alphabet one more letter :confused:

And Vera why do you(I mean Finnish) always write in words 2 vowels together? DO you pronounse it twice? I wanted to say that I have never seen so many vowels putted together. Or may be I'm wrong?

Izie? what's your alphabet?

the_GoDdEsS
07-08-2006, 02:41 AM
aw, come the fuck on, if foreigners can learn english in a few years (including spelling of "difficult" words), AMERICAN kids can too.

unless they're, well, retarded. or dyslexic, in which case they get a break anyway.

I agree. Except we're usually drilled the spelling of words in schools when it comes to foreign language. However, they drilled us the spelling of our native language too. And that one's pretty difficult compared to English. Oh what the fuck at simplifying the spelling of English.

Izie
07-08-2006, 03:15 AM
Izie? what's your alphabet?

Similar to yours, it's cyrilics too, but we have some different letters!

Vera
07-08-2006, 08:55 AM
And Vera why do you(I mean Finnish) always write in words 2 vowels together? DO you pronounse it twice? I wanted to say that I have never seen so many vowels putted together. Or may be I'm wrong?


Well, it's like in English. "School" has two o's because it's a long sound. In Finnish one wovel is a short sound, two vowels is a long sound. Unless you mean stuff like "ou" or "au" as in 'sauna' where the sounds are basically two short vowel sounds put together.

Rocky-girl
07-08-2006, 10:50 AM
Oh, yes, thank you Izie and Vera!
NOw I know why Finnish use so many vowels!

Paint_It_Black
07-08-2006, 11:02 AM
In Finnish one wovel is a short sound

It's also an ingenious method of clearing snow. (http://www.wovel.com/Home/default.aspx)


I don't think that English is so hard language as to make it simpler.

Has anyone mentioned recently that you're adorable?

Vera
07-08-2006, 11:04 AM
FCUK (http://www.frenchconnection.com/home_06ss_uk.html) you, man.

Rocky-girl
07-08-2006, 11:13 AM
Has anyone mentioned recently that you're adorable?
Did I make a mistake in my post? Someone mentioned that some time ago...

Paint_It_Black
07-08-2006, 11:25 AM
Did I make a mistake in my post?

Not in any way you should be particularly concerned about.

wheelchairman
07-08-2006, 11:25 AM
I agree. Except we're usually drilled the spelling of words in schools when it comes to foreign language. However, they drilled us the spelling of our native language too. And that one's pretty difficult compared to English. Oh what the fuck at simplifying the spelling of English.
We have that in America too. They are called spelling tests. Lasts up until 6th grade. Perhaps that is one reason why we don't suck at the spelling.

Rocky-girl
07-08-2006, 11:31 AM
Not in any way you should be particularly concerned about.
Did it become worse?

Paint_It_Black
07-08-2006, 11:35 AM
Did it become worse?

No, you're fine, really. Don't worry about it.

the_GoDdEsS
07-08-2006, 11:37 AM
We have that in America too. They are called spelling tests. Lasts up until 6th grade. Perhaps that is one reason why we don't suck at the spelling.

We used to do dictations. The teacher would read something and we'd have to write it down. Usually one or two pages with words that are not necessarily easy to spell. Don't forget we also have the letters with accents. No mistake was an A, one or two mistakes was a B, etc. Kids were horrified of that in primary schools because they'd have to do it every week. The grades were usually bad but it had its effect in the end.

wheelchairman
07-08-2006, 11:51 AM
Where I was. The general method was to give the students a list of words in the beginning of the week (30-40 words or so). They would have to study them and write some kind of homework dictation (the word, the word in a sentence, word type, and it's root language.) Then on Friday, 10 of these words would randomly be chosen, and the student would have to write it down as best as he could from memory.

It sounds really easy. But a lot of people had a very difficult time with it. It was also divided by ability. I just had a knack for remembering words. Even though I seem to make more mistakes than I used to these days.

Tizzalicious
07-08-2006, 12:14 PM
Where I was. The general method was to give the students a list of words in the beginning of the week (30-40 words or so). They would have to study them and write some kind of homework dictation (the word, the word in a sentence, word type, and it's root language.) Then on Friday, 10 of these words would randomly be chosen, and the student would have to write it down as best as he could from memory.

It sounds really easy. But a lot of people had a very difficult time with it. It was also divided by ability. I just had a knack for remembering words. Even though I seem to make more mistakes than I used to these days.

Yupz, same here. I was good at it, I am good at memorizing things if I try. I also always scored on the vocabulary tests in other languages, and topography. Not that I remember anything, but hey.

Rocky-girl
07-08-2006, 12:19 PM
Here we have dictations(like Simonka said) from 2nd form. Then expositions( when teacher reads you a text and then you must retell that text in writing form) and since 5th form you have student's nightmare - competition(detailed answer on question) That's hard, but I think it's very useful.

DOes black and white means in writing form???

Preocupado
07-08-2006, 06:06 PM
English is already very practical and easy to learn. I even dislike reading the literature written in english, because, in my head, it sounds insipid.

the_GoDdEsS
07-08-2006, 10:28 PM
competition(detailed answer on question) That's hard, but I think it's very useful.


Something like composition or essay when you write about a topic? And they grade content and spelling?

Rocky-girl
07-09-2006, 02:39 AM
Something like composition or essay when you write about a topic? And they grade content and spelling?
Yes, I meant that. They grade size too. It's very hard, isn't it?

the_GoDdEsS
07-09-2006, 02:40 AM
Yes, it used to be. But I liked writing.

Rocky-girl
07-09-2006, 02:52 AM
I liked it sometimes, when I liked topic and when I was in special mood, in other days that was a real nightmare for me to write!

the_GoDdEsS
07-09-2006, 02:54 AM
Yeah, that's true. Sometimes they gave us two topics to choose from so that was better. And I can't write well when I am not in the mood for it.

Vera
07-09-2006, 04:23 AM
We had dictations, too, mostly to see which kids had possible reading problems or writing problems. I did fine, since I didn't get any extra education. Later they would repeat similar tests to see if any of us had problems that might affect our final exam result - if a problem was discovered, like that it took someone very long to read a short text, they could get extra education and if they still had a problem, they got an extra hour or more to do their exams.

Mmm, nanny state.