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Camilamazed
10-26-2006, 08:02 AM
1) The noose, is the name of that rope men hang themselves (when they're losers) right??

2) Is "It's shallow living" something like *No more hope for better days*??
(Couldn't get very well the meaning of shallow)

3) Tried google and wikipedia for Mark'r , but couldn't get it either.

4) The noose is falling: Something like Running out of time??, Nothing to be done besides dying?

& According to the song, are the enemies rising in number or in power??

Need some head up on that to fit the idea into Portuguese words.

Thank you!!

randman21
10-26-2006, 08:19 AM
Errr, I'm terrible with song lyrics/meanings so I can't answer much. I can say that a noose is the actual knot in the rope that losers (or pretty much anyone who is being hanged) use to be hanged. So a noose is a knot.

And "the enemies are rising," to me, means that, as the common man is losing his power, the enemies are gaining it.

Camilamazed
10-26-2006, 08:22 AM
Thanks!!!!!!

:)

ygokazuki
10-26-2006, 08:24 AM
1) The noose, is the name of that rope men hang themselves (when they're losers) right??Yep, it was how people were executed a while ago.

2) Is "It's shallow living something like" *No more hope for better days*??Shallow means meaningless or without much substance, so yeah, they're kinda similar, you could say. I'd say shallow living = living without a meaning, hopelessly, emo kinda thing. lol
3) Tried google and wikipedia for Mark'r , but couldn't get it either.Mak'r = God. Our mak'r comes a'calling = God is calling to us, which means death is coming.
4) The noose is falling: Something like Running out of time??, Nothing to be done besides dying?Yeah, pretty much.
& According to the song, are the enemies rising in number or in power??Well it's kinda the same idea, right? They're rising, and you have no hope against them.
Hope I was of some help!

brothadave79
10-26-2006, 08:28 AM
1) The noose, is the name of that rope men hang themselves (when they're losers) right??

2) Is "It's shallow living something like" *No more hope for better days*??
(Couldn't get very well the meaning of shallow)

3) Tried google and wikipedia for Mark'r , but couldn't get it either.

4) The noose is falling: Something like Running out of time??, Nothing to be done besides dying?

& According to the song, are the enemies rising in number or in power??

Need some head up on that to fit the idea into Portuguese words.

Thank you!!

1. A noose is used when someone hangs themself, but more often it was used when hanging criminals.

2. It's pretty close to the same thing.

3. He just took "Maker," referring to God, and put an apostrophe in between the K and the R. "Our Maker comes a calling," meaning we don't have much time left to live.

4. Yes.

Camilamazed
10-26-2006, 09:43 AM
Now it makes sense. I spelled mark'r no Mak'r.

You guys are neat!

Thanks
:)

randman21
10-26-2006, 09:49 AM
Now it makes sense. I spelled mark'r no Mak'r.


Haha, yeah. That confused the heck outta me. No wonder I couldn't find mark'r:o

platinumpt
10-26-2006, 11:54 AM
Yes, the noose is the rope that hangs men, indeed. But in this case, it looks like a metaphore. I'd say *the noose* (which also means NÓ, em português) like *the brotherhood*, *the gang*, *the clan* something like that. Like, our "alliance" is breaking down, and enemies are "attacking" us, now that they know we're weak. The song explores that theme from the beginning to the end, in my opinion. It kind of reminds me of "We Are One", because of the fall of the unity or brotherhood kind of idea. It was my first impression, the first time I read the lyrics and heard the song. That kinda made me feel disapointed, because I wasn't expecting they would explore the same themes they explored before. The walls come tumbling down > The noose is falling.

Hypodermic_89
10-26-2006, 12:18 PM
I find this thread interesting and educational.


(No sarcasm)

joey1234
10-26-2006, 12:56 PM
Dexter himself told in some interview that the lyrics he comes up with are meant to be freely interpreted, so I guess anyone can make it their own way and still be correct. If someone needs a Portuguese translation of the lyrics, I can do it for you. :D

Camilamazed
10-26-2006, 03:00 PM
I find this thread interesting and educational.


(No sarcasm)

:)


Ygokazuzi and brothadave, thank you very much for the attention.

Randman, I confused the heck out myself as well hahahaha... That's whay Wikipedia wasn't working.

platinumt, I also believe it's metaphore. Just wanted to make sure, but I don't believe it's as a knot (NÓ). I didn't pay attention to We are one, thank you for the heads up!
(Você também acha díficil encontrar palavras para traduzir???)

Joey, your help will be very much welcomed!

platinumpt
10-26-2006, 04:38 PM
:)
platinumt, I also believe it's metaphore. Just wanted to make sure, but I don't believe it's as a knot (NÓ). I didn't pay attention to We are one, thank you for the heads up!
(Você também acha díficil encontrar palavras para traduzir???)

haha de nada ;)

é assim, em Portugal nós dizemos que quando algum grupo é forte, e muito unido, eles estão atados como um "nó". Que é para dar a ideia de ser mesmo muito forte, percebes? O dexter ao dizer "the noose" não devia querer dizer "o nó" literalmente, mas sim talvez "a irmandade", "a aliança", "o grupo", qualquer coisa do género. Esta pelo menos foi a minha interpretação, eles têm musicas que de pessoa para pessoa varia muito a interpretação!

Claro que existem algumas músicas dificeis de entender o significado total da musica. Por exemplo, só há pouco tempo é que finalmente entendi a 100% a self esteem! E ainda agora não compreendo a letra toda da dirty magic, há partes que não entendo bem :(

Venom Symbiote
10-26-2006, 07:00 PM
Dexter himself told in some interview that the lyrics he comes up with are meant to be freely interpreted, so I guess anyone can make it their own way and still be correct.

Everyone's a winner!

Fuck-fucking fucks. Too much freedom of interpretation these days, especially since 90% of the time people are wrong. Yet how dare we tell them what to think, right? Right?

Gah.

Little_Miss_1565
10-26-2006, 08:46 PM
I don't get why he'd use "mak'r," anyway...traditionally, you'd throw the apostrophe in there to indicate that a generally two syllable word is being pronounced as one--like why in a lot of church music, you'll see "heaven" written in lyrics as "heav'n" and sung like "hevn." But in "The Noose," Dexter says "maker," two syllables. Que?

Llamas
10-26-2006, 09:05 PM
I always thought that the song was supposed to be heard like a prophecy. It's totally "here's what's coming" and it sounds lyrically like a message from a superior knowing being. So I think the whole point of "mak'r" was just to sound religious in that way. I could be pulling things out of my ass, in which case, I have NO idea. That's just what I think.

Camilamazed
10-26-2006, 09:12 PM
Well, I kind think like you now, llamas. When I found the meaning for Mak'r, I got the song better. Specially followed by the *Now I lay you down, Put the coins in your eyes And blow the candles out*

I read somewhere in this forum, that this sentence sympolizes death, or something like that. A kind of ritual.

It can be totally insane, but after reading what you people wrote here, it seems to me now that it's a song that talks about the apocalyse.

Is my thought nonsense? You guys can be honest!! Please!

Venom Symbiote
10-26-2006, 09:34 PM
The "mak'r" I always read as the same as capitalising "God". As in, he's referring to the maker, not a maker. Just like you can talk about "gods", but if you're referring to the individual (whichever one it may be) it's going to have a capital.

"Mak'r" is kind of old-fashioned. As in referring to the Big Man himself, instead of just "a maker" of something in general.

Just making it more clear it's a kind of spiritual/liturgical/apocalyptic vibe. Probably what he was aiming for with that odd choice of wording.

Little_Miss_1565
10-26-2006, 10:03 PM
But that's the thing...it's not old-fashioned to spell maker as 'mak'r', it serves a specific literary purpose to do so.

Camila, the bit about the coins over eyes and blowing candles out references death traditions. Coins were placed over the dead person's eyes to keep them closed--before it was common to sew eyelids shut--during the wake and funeral and whenever else people might be viewing the body. There are also some traditions that call for the coins over the deceased's eyes to be buried with them so they can pay the boatman to take them across the river (styx?) to the afterlife. Blowing candles out generally signifies the end of a ritual or service.

Camilamazed
10-26-2006, 10:12 PM
Yeah, Now the song is totally clear.

Thanks both of you!

Venom Symbiote
10-26-2006, 10:40 PM
it serves a specific literary purpose to do so.

Oh, I'm not denying it does. Rather, that specific literary purpose is old-fashioned, outside of church music it's not used too often.

zacsta
10-27-2006, 03:09 AM
well i never tried to interpret what the noose is about but a few days ago someone on here said it was about the apocalypse and then i went and read the lyrics and it seems like it is.
anyways, who cares, THE NOOSE IS KICK-ASS

darea
10-27-2006, 04:42 AM
this is a cool topic its always good to have different interpretations about songs

Camilamazed
10-27-2006, 09:40 AM
well i never tried to interpret what the noose is about but a few days ago someone on here said it was about the apocalypse and then i went and read the lyrics and it seems like it is.

I'm sure you read it 2 or 3 days ago at last because I just wrote it HERE!:cool:

Darea, I've been enjoying that too. It's really important to me to get differents opinion and make sure I'm translating the songs accurately.


In a nutshell

The noose = No more hope for better days!

:D

Camilamazed
10-27-2006, 01:21 PM
Man, that's the worst part of translating songs.

You've got no idea how difficult it is (Specially Enlglish to Portuguese). I've been translating the Offspring songs to help people that are not able to understand. But lately, a group of people instead of caringe about helping the others, are only worried about doubting what I'm doing. That's why I come here and ask for your help.

Now, I've been asked the literal meaning for *Noose*. I googled it and what I could fing was the hangman, but they keep saying my translation is kind of wrong for the literal meaning is "tie" or "knot" (Symbolizing a kind of connection).

What do you say???

(a) I'm nice for doing that.
(b) They're ungrateful.
(c) They're jealous because they haven't come up with this idea.
(b) They suck. Let them find the meaning by themselves.

HELP!

Venom Symbiote
10-27-2006, 07:36 PM
You suck muchly.

Camilamazed
10-27-2006, 07:41 PM
You suck muchly.

Not as much like you :D

Venom Symbiote
10-27-2006, 07:53 PM
Aww. Feel the love!

Camilamazed
10-27-2006, 07:57 PM
Aww. Feel the love!

You'd help instead of showing off your love for me. No one needs to know about it.;)

Little_Miss_1565
10-27-2006, 11:27 PM
Oh, I'm not denying it does. Rather, that specific literary purpose is old-fashioned, outside of church music it's not used too often.

No, it's used in poetry a lot. Though now that the rules of poetry are no longer hard-and-fast it's used a lot less.

Hah, can you tell I got my degree in English?

-=Xander=-
10-27-2006, 11:36 PM
I find this thread interesting and educational.


(No sarcasm)

Lol it is isn't it? I feel like I am reading a dictionary and I learned some stuff too! :D

Camilamazed
10-27-2006, 11:43 PM
:(

If you don't want to answer me, that's okay.

NMHFBD
10-28-2006, 01:44 AM
you should try to translate "Vultures".

Camilamazed
10-28-2006, 03:08 PM
I'll try that one later on.

Right now I still need to know the exact meaning for Noose.

SplinterByMyOwnDesign
10-29-2006, 06:58 PM
I'll try that one later on.

Right now I still need to know the exact meaning for Noose.

-Go to: www.google.com

-Type: "Define: Noose"

-Read your results:

Definitions of noose on the Web:

snare: a trap for birds or small mammals; often has a slip noose
make a noose in or of
a loop formed in a cord or rope by means of a slipknot; it binds tighter as the cord or rope is pulled
secure with a noose
wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

This article is about the simple slip-knot, sometimes known as a noose. For a noose capable of resisting attempts to loosen it, see Hangman's knot
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noose

Use HANGING-NOOSE or HUNTING-NOOSE if possible.
www.mda.org.uk/bmobj/Obthesn1.htm

Camilamazed
10-29-2006, 07:07 PM
Questions:

Have you read ALL the thread???

Do you think I'm an idiot?

Do you think I'd start this thread just because I'm a sucker who can't type "google"?


I tried Wikkipedia and Google to get the meaning. Still people doubted and I just wanted to amke sure. You didn't need to do that because I already tried that.

Read again the thread, please?

Venom Symbiote
10-30-2006, 03:17 PM
Do you think I'm an idiot?

*giggles*

*giggles some more*