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ShadowPyro
12-12-2006, 04:49 PM
I've enjoyed reading books since i was around the age of four, and i like to hear what other people think of the books i read, and I like to hear other people's suggestions on what else to read.

So, the books I've been reading lately are:

1984
Animal Farm

Anything from the Artemis Fowl and Harry Potter series, Lord of the Rings, and a lot more i cant recall right.

I recommend all of those books. Get Artemis Fowl and Harry Potter for light, easy reading, and 1984 and Animal Farm for harder stuff.

I'm also going to be reading Nostromo by Joesph Conrad soon.

Overworked & Underfucked
12-12-2006, 04:56 PM
It really depends on what type of books you like. I'm a die hard Stephen King fan, but some of my other favourite novels are The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold, Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman, and Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson. I only got through the first ten pages of 1984 before I gave up. So much for reading a "classic" novel. I did manage to get all the way through another "classic," Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger, and was very disappointed. Also, I love almost everything ever written by Ray Bradbury.

ShadowPyro
12-12-2006, 05:02 PM
It really depends on what type of books you like. I'm a die hard Stephen King fan, but some of my other favourite novels are The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold, Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman, and Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson. I only got through the first ten pages of 1984 before I gave up. So much for reading a "classic" novel. I did manage to get all the way through another "classic," Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger, and was very disappointed. Also, I love almost everything ever written by Ray Bradbury.

I'm gonna probably check out some Steven King stuff, and maybe some of the other things you mentioned. I really liked 1984, i heard so much about it before i read it, and it's one of the few books i actually got excited about reading it.

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 05:05 PM
The Polar Express!

And my favorite is Dante’s Divine Comedy. But that is complex and a high level of reading. Also anything from Virgil, Homer or Plato, all of them are timeless classics. I’ve also been recommended Seutonius, Euripdes and Aristophanes.

But on easier affairs, Matthew Pearl wrote a wonderful “Da Vinci Code" like work of literature called “The Dante Club.” It’s an easier read then Dante’s translated works, but it would not help to have some back round knowledge of The Inferno. This book, however, takes place in Boston during 1865 and is about murders inspired by scenes within the Inferno. Men who are translating Dante’s Inferno must solve the mystery. I find it captivating; it takes you attention right away and doesn’t let you down for a moments notice.

ShadowPyro
12-12-2006, 05:14 PM
But on easier affairs, Matthew Pearl wrote a wonderful “Da Vinci Code" code like work of lecture called “The Dante Club.” It’s an easier read then Dante’s translated works, but it would not help to have some back round knowledge of The Inferno. This book, however, takes place in Boston during 1865 and is about murders inspired by scenes within the Inferno. Men who are translating Dante’s Inferno must solve the mystery. I find it captivating; it takes you attention right away and doesn’t let you down for a moments notice.

Ok, I'll check that out. And that reminded me, "The Da Vinci Code" was my favorite book of last year.


The Polar Express!
Great book :)

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 05:30 PM
I love the Polar Express!

Oxygene
12-12-2006, 05:34 PM
actually the da vinci code fucking rocked.. I read it back to back in one day.. I couldn't put the book down. 1984 was also great as was animal farm (esp having lived under communist rule). I'm not a big reader, but books like the corporation and no logo and stuff like that are awesome.. since we seem to have the same kind of taste, maybe you should check those out, you might like those two books as well!

HornyPope
12-12-2006, 05:44 PM
I say all teenage boys absolutely have to read Hemingway to acquire a sense of romantika.

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 05:46 PM
ok? .

HornyPope
12-12-2006, 05:50 PM
Well read it. It'll do you more good than the crap others' listed above. Unless you're stupid. No point in reading books if you don't understand it.

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 05:54 PM
Its romantic or romance... just in another language.

HornyPope
12-12-2006, 05:55 PM
It's a word I made up. Or maybe it already exists? I don't know, I don't care, it means romanticism in an adventurous way.

Edit: It doesn't mean "romance". Well, not the way you think of it. Think more like Victor Hugo "romance".

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 05:57 PM
It's the Slovak way to spell romance, I believe.

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 06:00 PM
Well I know the way you are using the word. To romanticize something is to make it more epic or more dramatic. Right?

HornyPope
12-12-2006, 06:02 PM
Well I know the way you are using the word. To romanticize something is to make it more epic or more dramatic. Right?

Yeah that's it. You got it.

ShadowPyro
12-12-2006, 06:03 PM
I say all teenage boys absolutely have to read Hemmingway to acquire a sense of romantika.

Ok, got any specific novels by Hemingway to recommend?

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 06:05 PM
Yeah that's it. You got it.

Yep, I’m smarter in the field of literature because I love to read and write.

coke_a_holic
12-12-2006, 06:08 PM
Based on what you're reading (basically, the 10th grade English curriculum, right?), though, I can think of a few you might like.

1. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
2. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
3. Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger
4. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

You may have already read the last two, they're also in the high school English curriculum.

EDIT: HP, recommend some good Hemingway; I almost got A Farewell to Arms a few weeks ago, but wasn't sure if there would be a better one to start with.

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 06:11 PM
Based on what you're reading (basically, the 10th grade English curriculum, right?), though, I can think of a few you might like.

1. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
2. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
3. Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger
4. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

You may have already read the last two, they're also in the high school English curriculum.

EDIT: HP, recommend some good Hemingway; I almost got A Farewell to Arms a few weeks ago, but wasn't sure if there would be a better one to start with.

9th grade for me. And I hated To Kill A Mockingbird. Now not to say that it isn't a great classic, no doubt it is. But It was too slow for my tastes.

ShadowPyro
12-12-2006, 06:12 PM
Based on what you're reading (basically, the 10th grade English curriculum, right?), though, I can think of a few you might like.

1. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
2. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
3. Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger
4. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

You may have already read the last two, they're also in the high school English curriculum.

EDIT: HP, recommend some good Hemingway; I almost got A Farewell to Arms a few weeks ago, but wasn't sure if there would be a better one to start with.

I read "To Kill a Mockingbird", but thats it on that list. I'm only in eighth grade anyway, i just really enjoy reading. I kind of enjoy writing, but not as much.

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 06:13 PM
The book we are reading now, "Night" is really good. It's by Elie Wiesel.

ShadowPyro
12-12-2006, 06:15 PM
The book we are reading now, "Night" is really good. It's by Elie Wiesel.

Thats the one book suggested so far that i honestly have never, ever heard of. I'll look up some reviews and find out what it's about.

Llamas
12-12-2006, 06:16 PM
I've mostly only read classics... but some GREAT ones are:

Snow Falling on Cedars (David Guterson)
Invisible Man (Ralph Ellison)
Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald)
Caucasia (Danzy Senna) this book was inspired a lot by Invisible Man... both are damn good.
House of Mirth (Edith Wharton)

adombomb222
12-12-2006, 06:17 PM
It's a Nobel Peace Prize winner. It's about What Elie Went through at Auschwitz.

coke_a_holic
12-12-2006, 06:20 PM
You should definitely check out Catch-22, it's easily the funniest book I've ever read. At the same time, though, it is completely depressing. It's about a Captain in the army during WWII and the problems with a paradoxical law (catch 22) that make his life unnecessarily difficult. Like, part of the law states that you get to leave the army if you're deemed psychologically unstable, but any soldier that claims to be psychologically unstable has to be stable enough to recognize their own instability, thereby making them sane enough to remain in the army.

On the Road is a lot deeper, yet less satirical. It's about a beatnik that hitch hikes across the country and the people he meets on the way. It's a pretty sad story, but I loved it.

Catcher in the Rye is about Holden Caulfield. He whines, he complains, he's unnecessarily elitist, and he's the most human character I've read out of a book. He's the definition of an anti-hero, and I thought that the book was great, despite having a snotty "I'm a teenager" tone.

ShadowPyro
12-12-2006, 06:26 PM
It's a Nobel Peace Prize winner. It's about What Elie Went through at Auschwitz.

That sounds interesting. I'll check that out.



Invisible Man (Ralph Ellison)

Thats one of my favorite books. I absolutely loved it.



You should definitely check out Catch-22, it's easily the funniest book I've ever read. At the same time, though, it is completely depressing. It's about a Captain in the army during WWII and the problems with a paradoxical law (catch 22) that make his life unnecessarily difficult. Like, part of the law states that you get to leave the army if you're deemed psychologically unstable, but any soldier that claims to be psychologically unstable has to be stable enough to recognize their own instability, thereby making them sane enough to remain in the army.

On the Road is a lot deeper, yet less satirical. It's about a beatnik that hitch hikes across the country and the people he meets on the way. It's a pretty sad story, but I loved it.

Catcher in the Rye is about Holden Caulfield. He whines, he complains, he's unnecessarily elitist, and he's the most human character I've read out of a book. He's the definition of an anti-hero, and I thought that the book was great, despite having a snotty "I'm a teenager" tone.

They all sound good. I think i'll check out "Catcher in the Rye" and "Catch 22"

HornyPope
12-12-2006, 07:38 PM
Ok, got any specific novels by Hemingway to recommend?




EDIT: HP, recommend some good Hemingway; I almost got A Farewell to Arms a few weeks ago, but wasn't sure if there would be a better one to start with.

A Farewell to Arms is a great book, but I think it's better to start with To Whom the Bells Toll (they toll for thee!), it's a slightly more exciting read from my experience. Otherwise the Sun Also Rises is quality read, as is the Old Man and the Sea, though that one isn't quite in the same genre as the first three.

ShadowPyro
12-12-2006, 07:49 PM
A Farewell to Arms is a great book, but I think it's better to start with To Whom the Bells Toll (they toll for thee!), it's a slightly more exciting read from my experience. Otherwise the Sun Also Rises is quality read, as is the Old Man and the Sea, though that one isn't quite in the same genre as the first three.

Thanks, I'll try To Whom the Bells Toll.

Mota Boy
12-12-2006, 08:11 PM
Personally, I was incredibly disappointed by "The Da Vinci Code", but that's another story.

If you want a great book that's just a damn fun read, check out "Snow Crash" by Neal Stephenson. It's just an absolute blast - a sci-fi/action tale done with a remarkable intelligence.

Endymion
12-12-2006, 09:54 PM
Personally, I was incredibly disappointed by "The Da Vinci Code", but that's another story.

If you want a great book that's just a damn fun read, check out "Snow Crash" by Neal Stephenson. It's just an absolute blast - a sci-fi/action tale done with a remarkable intelligence.

i've been reading to read that for a while. i loved gibson's neuromancer.

anyway, at the moment the books that come to mind...:
Flicker - Theodore Roszak
Geek Love - Katherine Dunn
The Contortionist's Handbook - Craig Clevenger

were all fairly fun to read.

killer_queen
12-13-2006, 04:44 AM
The Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - James Joyce

Joyce is sooo awesome. I don't know how many times I read that book.

Also, Julio Cortazar's We Love Glenda So Much and a Change of Light is a book that everyone must read. Great choice if you're not a big fan of novels.

khaaaaan
12-13-2006, 05:11 AM
Anything by Chuck Palahniuk.

wheelchairman
12-13-2006, 05:45 AM
Phil got it.

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk should be read by every high school student so they can be like "dude, wtf, this sucks."

Another must read is
"One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" by Ken Kesey (another Oregonian...)

killer_queen
12-13-2006, 05:50 AM
Actually I liked Palahniuk's Invisible Monsters. It wasn't that bad at all. But Fight Club? No, thanks. I hate Palahniuk for making every teen I know fucking idiots.

wheelchairman
12-13-2006, 05:54 AM
Yeah it's meant for white people who are smart enough to handle it. (Sorry Johnny!).

Invisible Monsters is great too. You'd like Survivor's.

Tizzalicious
12-13-2006, 05:55 AM
Actually I liked Palahniuk's Invisible Monsters. It wasn't that bad at all. But Fight Club? No, thanks. I hate Palahniuk for making every teen I know fucking idiots.

I liked Invisible Monsters more too. Though I like Fight Club aswell. Just not as much.

Jakebert
12-13-2006, 12:14 PM
Helter Skelter by Vincent Bugliosi.

The creepiest book I've ever read. It's about the Manson Murders, and if considered the "official" book on the case. Probably the best non-fiction murder novel ever written.

T-6005
12-13-2006, 12:54 PM
Some fun Bradbury. The Illustrated Man, Something Wicked This Way Comes, and The Martian Chronicles.

Fahrenheit 451 has been compared to 1984, though I personally prefer the Bradbury one.

RickyCrack
12-13-2006, 01:43 PM
Helter Skelter by Vincent Bugliosi.

The creepiest book I've ever read. It's about the Manson Murders, and if considered the "official" book on the case. Probably the best non-fiction murder novel ever written.

I just had to read Manson in his Own Words by Nuel Emmons. Surprisingly he was actually a pretty cool guy until he killed a few people.

Anyways, I suggest reading

1. Myra Breckinridge by Gore Vidal (history's weirdest book)
2. Cats Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
3. Jesus' Son by David Johnson
4. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
5. Beebo Brinker by Ann Bannon
6. The Things they Carried by Tim O'Brien
7. Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris
8. Money Secrets by Dave Berry

JohnnyNemesis
12-13-2006, 01:49 PM
Surprisingly he was actually a pretty cool guy until he killed a few people.

That seems to be the case pretty often, actually.


6. The Things they Carried by Tim O'Brien

Fucking fuck you hell yes. Masterfully written.

RickyCrack
12-13-2006, 01:52 PM
Fucking fuck you hell yes. Masterfully written.

Oh hell yea, my favorite part was the shit swamp.

Overworked & Underfucked
12-13-2006, 08:16 PM
Has anyone read Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse? Someone recommended that book to me many years ago and I still haven't gotten around to reading it. Apparently it's the type of book that turns you into a different person when you're done reading it.

HornyPope
12-13-2006, 11:41 PM
Has anyone read Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse? Someone recommended that book to me many years ago and I still haven't gotten around to reading it. Apparently it's the type of book that turns you into a different person when you're done reading it.

I've gone a third into the book, it's a dull read. Very German.

Endymion
12-13-2006, 11:43 PM
That seems to be the case pretty often, actually.

our good buddy the unabomber was a fucking math genius before everyone made fun of him for being a nerd and he started living in the woods and hand-crafting bombs.

JohnnyNemesis
12-13-2006, 11:46 PM
One of the professors at this here school I attend is credited with identifying who wrote them there Unabomber letters. But he's a total dick and made a complete ass out of himself on a national stage when he worked on the Jon Benet Ramsey case lololololol.

I registered for one of his classes but dropped it after day one because it was waaaaaaaaaay too white for me.

Jakebert
12-14-2006, 04:34 AM
There's a teacher at my school who grew up down the road from Jeffory Dahmer.

darea
12-26-2006, 02:20 AM
SNARE
http://bobsbooks.wordpress.com/files/2006/08/snare1.jpg

For anyone who likes science fiction/Fantasy

UgLy_eLf
12-26-2006, 02:32 AM
Brave New World by Huxley

Overworked & Underfucked
12-26-2006, 10:25 AM
Brave New World by Huxley

I was supposed to read Brave New World in grade eleven english. I don't remember much about that class as I was hardly ever there and it was a long time ago, but I think I read the first three pages before giving up. What's the plot of that one?

sk8ter-hater
12-26-2006, 10:35 AM
Angels and Demons, another work by Dan Brown, is 10 times better than The Da Vinci Code.

lilian [darkest star]
12-26-2006, 10:52 AM
1. 1984
2. A Clockwork Orange
3. Scar Tissue

UgLy_eLf
12-26-2006, 12:10 PM
Its set in the future and morality is backwards. Everyone belongs to everyone, they all have sex with multiple partners, relationships are unspeakable. No mothers or fathers. Kids have "erotic play." Everyone is a testtube baby, all people are assigned into castes wearing different color clothes according to their caste. They're all conditioned to be a certain way, before they're even born. The lower caste is conditioned to serve, and consume. I could ramble on forever there's a lot of interesting stuff in this book, the first chapter is a little dry just have to run through it, its mainly an introduction into how people are "decanted." Theres no disease,poverty, but there is a place for "savages" in Mexico. They live much like we do, its pretty funny how these worlds clash in the middle of the book. Fun read, took me about a week to finish it off in a few sittings.

FrancoDaHui
12-26-2006, 09:29 PM
Angels and Demons, another work by Dan Brown, is 10 times better than The Da Vinci Code.

no

i recommend London Fields by Martin Amis, a masterpiece

calichix
12-26-2006, 11:27 PM
one flew over the cuckoo's nest, cat's cradle, the world according to garp, a widow for one year, a clockwork orange, the cider house rules, the sun also rises, a farewell to arms, the great gatsby, the motorcycle diaries, a separate reality- the teachings of don juan, and women of cuba.

ps: anything by dan brown is trash. the "facts" are interesting but any time he tries to develope a story or relationships between characters it's just like, "alright dude.. quit it."

Little_Miss_1565
12-26-2006, 11:38 PM
I second the David Sedaris mention, as well as "Catch 22" by Joseph Heller and "Cat's Cradle" by Kurt Vonnegut.

Jack Kerouac is boring like Charles Bukowski is boring. Everything they write is about the same thing and they rarely if ever have anything new or interesting to say about it, and rarely if every present anything in a new or interesting way. People like it because they read it when they're young and get swept up in how cool it must be to be such a badass like the characters. Yawn. "Junky" by Kerouac was pretty good, though.

calichix
12-27-2006, 12:07 AM
I love Charles Bukowski because he'll be ranting about what a dickhead he is and how terrible his last binge was, then "So I fed a cat some tuna!" comes out of nowhere. I'm gonna go ahead and add "Factotum" to my list of recommendations.