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Jakebert
01-25-2007, 10:29 AM
So, I've been getting interested in 60's counter-culture a lot lately, and I just ordered "The Doors of Perception" on Amazon. And I was just wondering, what would be some other good books from that era, or that influenced that era? They don't neccessary have to be from that era, as long as they're considered influential on the attitude of it.

wheelchairman
01-25-2007, 11:35 AM
This is obvious, "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" by Ken Kesey.

The definitive book of the time (and by an Oregonian,lol).

Jakebert
01-25-2007, 12:35 PM
I've actually already read that, about a year ago. I do agree that it's great, though.

Ellie
01-25-2007, 12:51 PM
I also think One Flew Over is great.


I just ordered "The Doors of Perception"

Make sure you read Heaven and Hell, too.

Here are some other suggestions:

Tom Wolfe's The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test.

Jack Kerouac's One the Road.

William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch; and other books by him as well, since he's considered a counterculture guru.

Allen Gingsberg's Howl.

Also check out books by Hunter Thompson, Richard Brautigan and Timothy Leary.

RickyCrack
01-25-2007, 01:00 PM
Myra Breckinridge (it was the book that could not be written)

Anything by Kerouac

Vonnegut......

David Johnson


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T-6005
01-25-2007, 01:32 PM
I second Vonnegut.

coke_a_holic
01-25-2007, 02:06 PM
I third Kerouac. On The Road is one fantastic book and I plan on starting The Subterraneans soon.

RickyCrack
01-25-2007, 02:17 PM
The Subterreans is an excellent read.

I forgot to mention Gore Vidal. But seriously, Myra Breckinridge is just about the craziest book ever written.

HornyPope
01-25-2007, 02:33 PM
American literature is dreck. Booo.

Endymion
01-25-2007, 03:34 PM
I forgot to mention Gore Vidal. But seriously, Myra Breckinridge is just about the craziest book ever written.

fully agreed.

Mota Boy
01-25-2007, 03:52 PM
Tom Wolfe's The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test.

Jack Kerouac's On the RoadThough all the books she mentioned are great, I was going to specifically recommend these two. And I'd suggest you make "On the Road" your next read, as it's more about the fifties beatnik period that leads in to the sixties. In fact, Dean Moriarty in Kerouac's novel is based on a man that reappears as Cassidy in Tom Wolfe's [non-fiction] book. Linked together, they give you a great feeling of the times, though I had to force myself to finish "On the Road", it was thick with atmosphere. Just in case you didn't know, "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test" tells the story of Ken Kesey, author of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest". Also pick up Hunter S. Thompson's "Hell's Angels". It's absolutely amazing to read about the meeting between the Hell's Angels and the Merry Pranksters from both the Pranksters' (Wolfe) and the Angels' (Thompson) points of view.

I've gotta put "Naked Lunch" on my to-read list.


American literature is dreck. Booo.Whatchoo talkin' 'bout, Pope?

tunepeg
01-25-2007, 05:48 PM
if you havent read anything by eric schlosser you've gotta check him out. he wrote both 'fast food nation' and what i think is the better of the two 'reefer madness.' great reads...

HornyPope
01-25-2007, 09:04 PM
Whatchoo talkin' 'bout, Pope?

Well you know, America has no culture. Its population is idiots who can't read and consequantly no good respectable writer ever emerged.

RickyCrack
01-25-2007, 10:07 PM
Well you know, America has no culture. Its population is idiots who can't read and consequantly no good respectable writer ever emerged.

Kurt Vonnegut?

Washington Irving?

Gore Vidal?

Edgar Alan Poe?

calichix
01-25-2007, 11:33 PM
john irving is great if you're looking for a really good story that's gonna completely dominate your thought process, as opposed to a book you'll look cool for reading (with good reason, but still).. especially the world according to garp. it's a bunking off work to read like a hermit kind of book. the cider house rules, the world according to garp, and a widow for one year are all really really good.

I just read cat's cradle by kurt vonnegut and it was also reallllllly really good. signature worthy, indeed. :]

also anything by charles dickens, the count of monte cristo, and les miserables are THUNDERING reads. ahaw.

HornyPope
01-26-2007, 06:20 AM
Kurt Vonnegut?

Washington Irving?

Gore Vidal?

Edgar Alan Poe?

The first is above average. Haven't read the next two so they must suck.

Poe is a lot of fun but lacking a central novel, denying him any comparisions with the Great authors. His stories will incidentally mark the identity of all future American works - captivating thrillers for kids. You read them once at 15, don't bother to re-read at 30.

There are two American authors I respect. Sad you should leave them out, further fodder to my argument.

Mota Boy
01-26-2007, 08:58 AM
Are you sure that you aren't confusing American literature with modern literature? Have there been any great non-American authors, as you (or hell, anyone else) define them, in the last century, particularly the last half of it? I'm not big on Twentieth-century foreign literature so I'm assuming my knowledge is far from exhaustive, but all I can think of at the moment is Federico Garcia Lorca and Kafka, both of whom wrote in the first quarter/third of the century.

Ellie
01-26-2007, 11:31 AM
I'm glad you put those books into perspective for him, MB, and also got a
plug in for Hell's Angels.


There are two American authors I respect. Sad you should leave them out, further fodder to my argument.

I'm curious to know what authors you think give good head food, American and otherwise.

RickyCrack
01-26-2007, 11:48 AM
The first is above average. Haven't read the next two so they must suck.

Poe is a lot of fun but lacking a central novel, denying him any comparisions with the Great authors. His stories will incidentally mark the identity of all future American works - captivating thrillers for kids. You read them once at 15, don't bother to re-read at 30.

There are two American authors I respect. Sad you should leave them out, further fodder to my argument.

I'm not too fond of Poe either. Some of his stories are fun, but gothic and beatnik wannabes take him too seriously.

Washington Irving is pretty sweet though. He was considered America's first great writer. He wrote stories such as "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle."

Gore Vidal wrote Myra Breckinridge and Alan Ginsberg wrote Howl. Not a very classy peopl but they did pretty much change literature for any book written after the 1960's.

F. Scott Fitzgerald, Mark Twain, William S. Bouroughs, Hunter S. Thompson, Ernest Hemmingway, Arthur Miller, (i'm refusing to mention Nathaniel Hawthorne because he wouldn't write a good book worth shit,) John Steinbeck, E.L. Doctorow, O. Henry, etc.

coke_a_holic
01-26-2007, 01:22 PM
Nathanial Hawthorne's The Scarlett Letter was fantastic.


...Except for the actual prose.


Also, I fail to see the genius of Mark Twain. He was pretty good, but I still can't figure out why he's considered a great American author. Huck Finn was great until the last 3rd of the book, when they basically said "you know all that shit Huck was learning about tolerance? Yeah, he's actually still a douche bag and is never going to learn his lesson!" Completely changed the tone of the book and made me lose a lot of respect for Twain.

Jakebert
01-26-2007, 03:11 PM
Also, I fail to see the genius of Mark Twain. He was pretty good, but I still can't figure out why he's considered a great American author. Huck Finn was great until the last 3rd of the book, when they basically said "you know all that shit Huck was learning about tolerance? Yeah, he's actually still a douche bag and is never going to learn his lesson!" Completely changed the tone of the book and made me lose a lot of respect for Twain.

I never got the big deal about Twain either. I didn't think he was horrible or anything, but I wasn't all that impressed by Huck Finn.

Also, to everyone who gave me reccommendations, thanks a lot. It was very helpful.

Mota Boy
01-26-2007, 03:26 PM
I just bought Twain's collected essays this morning and they're fantastic. Never read Huck Finn, but I did enjoy A Connecticut Yankee in King Author's Court.

Jakebert
01-26-2007, 03:30 PM
I read a few of his essays in my english class freshman year. I liked them a lot better than I liked Huck Finn.

HornyPope
01-26-2007, 04:04 PM
Are you sure that you aren't confusing American literature with modern literature? Have there been any great non-American authors, as you (or hell, anyone else) define them, in the last century, particularly the last half of it?

No, but very good point all the same.
Great authors in my mind are an extinct specie as is the "great novel". No one book is great and fantastic anymore, it's merely a cult story with its own following, some bigger than others. It doesn't challenge the world perception, it doesn't paint the human condition or takes a deep look in humanity, authors are almost humble, all they want is to tell "their" story.


I'm curious to know what authors you think give good head, American and otherwise.

Outside of the obvious? Nabokov, maybe?

ashtray_girl_1
01-26-2007, 06:26 PM
sorry, it's on-topic:
the sorrows of young werther is my all time favourite book, though i mostly read russian authors. ljermontov is my favoutire. and pushkin. those are the classics man!!

calichix
01-27-2007, 09:09 PM
why is it so cool to like nathaniel hawthorne and so uncool to like mark twain? the scarlet letter fucking sucked. and you know what else sucked? the old man and the sea. I went there. it. sucked.


ps: john steinbeck monterey county represent.

nameless
01-30-2007, 06:07 PM
been reading living high and letting die by peter unger, its pretty good, not for eveyones taste though!

JoY
01-30-2007, 06:22 PM
is anything ever for everyone's taste?

HornyPope
01-30-2007, 06:52 PM
Cumshots are.

JoY
01-30-2007, 06:54 PM
still not everybody likes them.

HornyPope
01-30-2007, 06:57 PM
I don't care, I just wanted to reply!

wheelchairman
01-31-2007, 05:25 AM
Vlad the obvious answer was "his mama is to everybody's tastes."