PDA

View Full Version : Most Important Albums Ever?



Jakebert
05-04-2007, 09:32 PM
I, like most of you, have read hundreds of lists of what are considered to be the most important albums of all time. I thought it could be fun to try to make a thread based on a similar idea. However, before you post, please actually think about your contribution. Importance is not the same as listing your favorite album, so please don't just list off whatever album you're currently listening to with no reason whatsoever. And on that note, please give some kind of reasoning behind your choice, because without that, it's pointless.

Anyway, my contribution to the thead is The Velvet Underground- White Light/White Heat.

Though a few bands had flirted with it a little before, this is the first album to truely use feedback and distortion as an integral part of the music, giving way to something that has become synonmous with every single form of hard rock music. Grunge, punk, alternative, metal, noise-rock, and tons more all descend from this album in a major way. In fact, even a lot of pop, country, and rap use distorted guitars. So this album basically helped set the standard that's used in practically every genre of music. Plus, it's a good album on top of all of that.

Venom Symbiote
05-04-2007, 09:41 PM
"Hung For The Holidays" - William Hung.

:p

JohnnyNemesis
05-05-2007, 12:13 AM
First off, lemme say that I'm sick of seeing "Pet Sounds" by the Beach Boys on this kind of list. Surprisingly, I actually agree that it is an important album that influenced many, but I'm just sick of seeing it constantly coming up (and also sick of seeing the white monopoly on music, but that's a whole 'nother story).

Anyway, my contribution would be U2's War. Half the people who don't like U2 are people who didn't hear anything before the regrettable "Beautiful Day" track and know nothing of the band's contribution beyond Bono's pretentious personality. These are the people I like to call "fucking worthless piece of shit morons".

"War" was a pivotal album in the sense that it combined pop and politics for a new era. Plus, it's just plain amazing.

bd007h
05-05-2007, 01:33 AM
One of the later Beatles would have to be on my list, but I can't decide which one.

mrconeman
05-05-2007, 01:49 AM
Feel free to disagree with me on this one, but I have to Say Ozzy Osbourne's Blizzard of Ozz, and Diary of a Madman albums.

Important to rock and metal anyway, and especially to the guitar, if you look at almost every single rock guitarist after both of these albums they will cite guitarist Randy Rhoads as a huge influence. Sadly somewhat over shadowed by the slightly earlier rise to fame of Eddie Van Halen, Rhoads contributed just as much and arguably more in his sadly cut short career than most guitarists ever will.

Only two professional albums, yet easily one of the most recognised and influential rock guitarists of all time. In my own opinion the perfect blend of virtuoso technique, and great musicianship. The first player to blend classical influences and ideas into the rock medium, and done it right too. There was Richie Blackmore before him, but he didn't do it to the extent that Rhoads had done on songs like Diary of A Madman, or Revelation Mother Earth.
All in all two albums showcasing a fucking brilliant musician, Ozzy has never came close to these albums since Rhoads died, and God knows he tries, everytime he makes a new album he states "Maybe even as good as Blizzard/Diary". Keep dreaming.

But yeah, thanks to Randy, these albums also pretty much solidified Ozzy's career in metal, after Black Sabbath when he was labeled washed up, And hes pretty obviously made his mark.

edit: Oh and JohnnyNemesis and I need to make manlove, <3 to War.

Llamas
05-05-2007, 04:25 AM
First off, lemme say that I'm sick of seeing "Pet Sounds" by the Beach Boys on this kind of list. Surprisingly, I actually agree that it is an important album that influenced many, but I'm just sick of seeing it constantly coming up (and also sick of seeing the white monopoly on music, but that's a whole 'nother story).

Anyway, my contribution would be U2's War. Half the people who don't like U2 are people who didn't hear anything before the regrettable "Beautiful Day" track and know nothing of the band's contribution beyond Bono's pretentious personality. These are the people I like to call "fucking worthless piece of shit morons".

"War" was a pivotal album in the sense that it combined pop and politics for a new era. Plus, it's just plain amazing.

I'm part of the half that's heard their entire collection of LPs, and their B-sides... and the more I heard, the more I hated them, haha. One of those bands that I tried to like because they're so popular that I thought I was missing something... nope, they still suck. :P

So far I disagree with all the albums in here. So I'll contribute later. :)

Forza
05-05-2007, 07:12 AM
There are so many influential albums... to just name a few:

Slayer - Reign In Blood.
Even though I don't like it; it's the album that defined thrash metal and 20 years after it's still the most influential album. If anyone disagrees on this one, just die.

Radiohead - The Bends / OK Computer.
No explanation needed.

Deep Purple - Machine Head
The album that together with Led Zeppelin IV and Black Sabbaths s/t album started heavy metal.

Bazza
05-05-2007, 07:55 AM
Radiohead - The Bends / OK Computer.
No explanation needed.
Awesome album, love it, always will, always have!

I think the problem with influential albums is that it's very easy to pick albums you love, rather than thinking about how it has affected music today. It also varies greatly on "genres" (I use the term loosely).

For example I'd say that Pink Floyd - Wish You Were Here is a truly inspirational album, yet that's because I really love it, I wouldn't be able to name any bands that have been influenced by them though.

Come out and smash'em up!
05-05-2007, 08:01 AM
Metallica - Master of Puppets: The first great heavy metal epic, important for any hevy metal guitarist
Metallica - Black Album: Brought Heavy Metal truly to the main stream.
Slayer - Reign in Blood: The Rawest trash metal album of the 80's
Nirvana - Nevermind: Grunge classic, awesome record with classic songs
Pantera - Cowboys from Hell: The beggining of the greatest metal bands of the 90's career
Iron Maiden - NUmber of the Beast: British 80's heavy to the fame
ACDC - Back in Black: Sold over 44 000000 pieces, what do i have to say?
Gun's N' Roses - Appetite for Destruction: MOst sold debut album, important for glam rock
Black Sabbath - Paranoid: The Beggining of Heavy Metal
The Ramones - The Ramones: Blitzkrieg bop: PUNK 1976!!!!
Sex Pistols - Nevermind the Bollocks here is the Sex pistols: Attitude record from Britan
Green Day - Dookie: important 90's punk album 1994!
The Offspring - Smash: important 90's punk album 1994!
Venom - Black Metal: First remarkable "black metal album"
RHCP - Blood,Sugar,Sex,Magic: Bring the funk, the beggining of RHCP
The Prodigy - The Fat of the Land: The most important techno album evah!

Jakebert
05-05-2007, 08:39 AM
come out and smash it up- You completely ignored the part where I said it wasn't just listing off bands and albums that you like. A good album is different than an important album. For example, I think that R.E.M.'s "New Adventures in Hi-Fi" is a very good album, but I don't think it's an important one.

Smash, the RHCP album, Dookie, and Nevermind the Bollocks were not important. The RHCP album did nothing aside from make the band popular, and since the band's contribution to music overall is very little since they didn't really do anything new, they just made it popular. Smash was a good album and did help make punk popular in the 90's, but really that's about all it did. There was nothing innovative about it. And Nevermind the Bollocks is horribly overrated.

JN- While I personally don't like U2, I agree that album is lyrically one of the best political albums of all time. Good call.

Forza- OK Computer is a really good album, but it's not much more experimental than anything else that was going on in the indie scene at the time. But, I guess the fact that it brought some more experimental stuff to the mainstream is noteworthy.

endlesst0m
05-05-2007, 09:20 AM
Smash was a good album and did help make punk popular in the 90's, but really that's about all it did.

Alright, so it helped initiate a huge movement in popular music in the 90's. Sounds pretty important to me. I'm a little confused about how you're defining "important". Is it mostly lyrics we're talking about here? Like a "concept" album?

Llamas
05-05-2007, 09:26 AM
I don't really see how any of the other contributions were more important than albums like Smash. They're albums that paved the way for a certain type of music or style to become more popular, it seems.

Jakebert
05-05-2007, 09:36 AM
I guess I just don't view something that's popular as something that's inherently important. I think a lot of the bands that built up the genre in the underground, like the Descendents for example, are much more important because they laid the blueprints for the actual music itself. All the Offspring did was have a few hit singles off of a mediocre album, same with Dookie.

And even though this wasn't brought up in either of your posts, I want to say that I realize I was being a dick toward come out and ect, but I made a point of mentioning what he did in my initial post to avoid it from happening, so it kind of bugged me that he misread it that much.

nieh
05-05-2007, 09:44 AM
Does anyone else see the irony in Bazza not being able to see any bands Pink Floyd influenced in the very same post that he's praising Radiohead? Not that Radiohead are a rip-off of Pink Floyd like some people suggest, but there's noticeable influence showing.

Bazza
05-05-2007, 09:57 AM
Does anyone else see the irony in Bazza not being able to see any bands Pink Floyd influenced in the very same post that he's praising Radiohead? Not that Radiohead are a rip-off of Pink Floyd like some people suggest, but there's noticeable influence showing.
I feel dumb now :(

I'm not really all that good at noticing influences, I guess that's why it's difficult for me to think of a truly important album :(

Thomas
05-05-2007, 10:37 AM
I think one of the most important albums out there would be Please Please Me by The Beatles, only because it brought The Beatles, widely regarded and the world's most influential band, into the spotlight for everyone to hear.

I'm sure I can think of more (Led Zeppelin IV and Dark Side of the moon, maybe?), but I'm too lazy to think right now.

Llamas
05-05-2007, 10:48 AM
After thinking about it, I don't think I really can contribute to this thread. The concept of an album being the "most important" just doesn't work to me. It's too personal of a thing. Some people would talk about how important Mozart is in regard to classical music, but others (like me) would disagree. Albums can be important to individual people, as music is heard differently by different people. We all get different things from every type of music, which makes it hard to say what's important versus what you just like a whole ton. I don't think Bazza should be "attacked" for his post, as I don't hear Pink Floyd influence in Radiohead, either. It's just how different people perceive music.

On that note, maybe it would help if it was defined what the albums were the most important to. Most important albums for the mainstream music industry, most important for the listener's emotions, most important lyrically, etc. Even then it's next to impossible.

I guess my point is that it's not fair to tell anyone they're wrong about which albums are the most important, because it is impossible to define. I would contribute some albums I consider important, but they'd probably end up being important to me, and therefore I'm biased to think they're important to everyone.

DirtyYeso
05-05-2007, 10:57 AM
Helloween - Keeper Of The Seven Keys Pt. I/II

These two albums released in 1987/88 are the most influential albums in Power Metal nowadays. Many Power Metal bands based themselves in the double bass drumming and the melodic/speedy melodies these albums show. Plus, the singing is now charakteristic for most of Power Metal with few exceptions.

Jakebert
05-05-2007, 11:10 AM
After thinking about it, I don't think I really can contribute to this thread. The concept of an album being the "most important" just doesn't work to me. It's too personal of a thing. Some people would talk about how important Mozart is in regard to classical music, but others (like me) would disagree. Albums can be important to individual people, as music is heard differently by different people. We all get different things from every type of music, which makes it hard to say what's important versus what you just like a whole ton. I don't think Bazza should be "attacked" for his post, as I don't hear Pink Floyd influence in Radiohead, either. It's just how different people perceive music.

On that note, maybe it would help if it was defined what the albums were the most important to. Most important albums for the mainstream music industry, most important for the listener's emotions, most important lyrically, etc. Even then it's next to impossible.

I guess my point is that it's not fair to tell anyone they're wrong about which albums are the most important, because it is impossible to define. I would contribute some albums I consider important, but they'd probably end up being important to me, and therefore I'm biased to think they're important to everyone.

The importance is depending on what the person thinks is important. That's what I hoped would make the thread interesting because I figured it would open up some kind of debate over what everyone thinks makes an album important. The whole reason I made the point of telling people to explain their choices is because I want to hear what makes an album important to them, but at the same time that doesn't mean I'm not going to argue my side if I disagree.

But obviously, by important, I don't just mean personally important. Green Day's "Nimrod" is incredibly important to me personally, since it's the first album I truely listened to, but I know in terms of a discussion like this, that fact is completely irrelevant. The importance is to music as a whole and what it did for it. There's lots of room in that broad discussion for disagreement and debate, which is what I want to hear.

opivy21
05-05-2007, 01:22 PM
Chuck Berry's first releases have to be some of the most important rock n' roll recordings ever. He arguably invented rock n' roll guitar, and whether he did or not, he was still a pioneer. People still play his licks today. (I should know; I do it myself)

Robert Johnson's music has also got to be very important. Rock n' roll's foundation is in the blues, and Johnson is a legend of the genre.

And whether you like them or not, it is hard to deny the influence of the Ramones.

Llamas
05-05-2007, 01:52 PM
Okay, Jakebert. I just get really annoyed with how pretentious people here about their tastes and how they always like to slam other people for their opinions. But alright.

I think that Barenaked Ladies - Born on a Pirate ship is an extremely important album. Unfortunately, BNL is a band that is written off as being silly and unserious, full of quick lyrics about dumb subjects. However, that is only a small part of their charm. They certainly did help define that type of music in the 90s, but they also mastered the art of creating songs that sound really fun and upbeat, making you want to dance, that were actually very deep and thought-provoking lyrically. They're also one of the only pop bands I know who use an upright bass, which I always found to add a lot to music that most bands seem to miss. While they didn't actually *invent* anything (which I don't think that inventing anything is that important in music, anyway), they did a lot that nobody else has really done. I've never heard anyone who quite sounds like they do.

I also think that Collective Soul (either the self titled or Hints, Allegations and Things Left Unsaid) is important. They were one of the best grunge bands of the early ninties (in my opinion, they were the best of the batch). This is because I think they were the most diverse and experimental, plus the Ed is an amazing singer, and Ross was an even more amazing guitarist.

Chicago II. Chicago is massively overlooked, particularly because they are currently better known for their 80s shit, after the singer died and Cetera took over and turned them into a crappy 80s band. Their work in the 70s was some of the best to offer, though, and they defined the art of having a full horn section in a band. Chicago II has some of their best songs, though it lacks Beginnings... but songs like Make Me Smile and 25 or 6 to 4 are incredible. They always were more interested in their music over being famous, which is a big part of why they were more overlooked. Plus the many musical styles incorporated in their music (rock, jazz, rnb, pop...) stands out in a big way.

All About Eve
05-05-2007, 06:51 PM
I'm going to go with Dream Theater - When Dream and Day Unite along with Dream Theater - Images and Words, because they were a big part in starting the late 80s - 90s jump in progressively labeled metal/rock. There were others of chorus, Queensryche etc.; but I'm the most familiar with Dream Theater, and they're one of the first metal bands to be more prog than heavy.

coke_a_holic
05-05-2007, 08:50 PM
London Calling by The Clash is my pick; it's a masterpiece and it has been a cd that I can listen to all the way through every once in a while for many years now. It's influenced a bunch of acts, and I honestly think it's one of the few albums impossible to dislike.

Venom Symbiote
05-05-2007, 09:43 PM
London Calling by The Clash is my pick; it's a masterpiece and it has been a cd that I can listen to all the way through every once in a while for many years now. It's influenced a bunch of acts, and I honestly think it's one of the few albums impossible to dislike.

You ass. :eek:

JohnnyNemesis
05-06-2007, 12:28 AM
One of those bands that I tried to like because they're so popular that I thought I was missing something... nope, they still suck. :P

Yeah, but you like Slipknot, so it's okay.


I just get really annoyed with how pretentious people here about their tastes and how they always like to slam other people for their opinions.

Oops :(

Marco
05-06-2007, 03:21 AM
Some of the most important albums ever are Queen albums. They played many genres (and I'm not talking about Bohemian Rhapsody), and revolutionised music, unlike other huge bands like them. So, in my opinion, any Queen album would do.

Llamas
05-06-2007, 06:23 AM
Yeah, but you like Slipknot, so it's okay.



Oops :(

hahaha. ;)

BuddyHolly
05-07-2007, 12:14 AM
Bob Marley & The Wailers - Exodus
Nirvana - Nevermind
The Police - Outlandos d'Amour

BREAK
05-08-2007, 09:51 AM
Captain Obvious here:

The Stooges - Fun House

Singlehandedly invented punk. Fuck the V.U.

Beastie Boys - License to Ill

First rap album to hit #1 on the charts. That's pretty cool.

N.W.A. - Straight Outta Compton

Started this gangsta shit. And this is the motherfucking thanks they get?

This thread makes baby Jesus cry. Bye.

SaiKYoU
05-08-2007, 10:00 AM
well, i see nobody said "appetite for destruction - Gn'R" i think is one of teh most influentials albums ever, and for me the most influential for the early 90's...

mrconeman
05-09-2007, 01:26 PM
well, i see nobody said "appetite for destruction - Gn'R" i think is one of teh most influentials albums ever, and for me the most influential for the early 90's...

This is probably the album that is most influential/important to me in every way imaginable, as a person, music fan and musician. However I didn't mention it because, yeah, while they did have a pretty large impact on the style of music going on then(and this album in particular, a huge impact on me), they really are one of the most over-rated bands ever (even though I still <3 them).

In the grand scheme of things other than Slash influencing alot of guitar players, I don't see music being much different had they never surfaced.