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View Full Version : Annoying, to say the least.



Sinister
08-12-2007, 09:38 PM
So, I'm at the beginning of a day during which I know I'll be spending a few hundred bucks buying various things; but I have my debit card and a few thousand bucks in my account, so no worries. Until the point my debit card, for some weird reason, gets deactivated. That's when I start having to use my credit card for everything; and I think I might have loaded it to within a few cents of the monthly limit in a few hours. And I didn't have any cash money with which to tip the waiter at the buffet (where I helped myself to every damn thing I wanted, so what the heck's the big deal if I don't give her these five bucks or so.), and despite my many many apologies, I think she was rather close to slapping my head off. To add a minor annoyance on top of all that, I have this little cut on my foot that the edge of my new shoes rub against, so I was sort of limping all day long.

PS: If anyone is, by any chance, interested in my mobile phone number, PM.

JohnnyNemesis
08-12-2007, 09:43 PM
Sounds like a rough day, man. But I'm gonna do the same thing I did in Andy's thread, and see if my comparably bad day makes you feel any better:

I went out to a nice Indian restaurant for dinner tonight. I went solo.

Something (I don't know WHAT) got stuck in my throat. I choked like crazy until I ended up half-puking all over the restaurant floor. Fortunately, I was the only customer there at the time, but still, pretty embarrassing stuff.

Did you ever figure out what was wrong with your debut card?

Oh, and:


PS: If anyone is, by any chance, interested in my mobile phone number, PM.

what the fuck?

Rag Doll
08-12-2007, 09:45 PM
with any debit/credit card, they will deactivate your account if you use it too often in a short period of time. this is to prevent fraud on your account. it happened to me at a bar. yay for having more cards and free drinks.

JohnnyNemesis
08-12-2007, 09:46 PM
yay for having more cards and huge, beautiful boobs that get me free drinks.

omg fix'd luv u

Rag Doll
08-12-2007, 09:48 PM
yaaaa, basically. ilu2<33

Sinister
08-12-2007, 09:54 PM
what the fuck?
I'd say equal parts not-so-subtle announcement I now have a mobile/cellphone/whatever else it might be called and attempt to actually get the thing ringing.

Oh, and thanks for the info Sam, but I'm not sure that's what it is, because the card was deactivated when I wanted to buy the first item of the day - but maybe adding that to the purchases from yesterday busted the limit for a 24-hour period. I'll have to call my bank tomorrow and figure things out. And if it's permanently deactivated - which, as far as I know, means about 300 hours' worth of cash down the drain... I'm not sure what I'll do, but I can guarantee no one will like it.

ninthlayer
08-12-2007, 11:10 PM
Waitress, not waiter.

RickyCrack
08-13-2007, 01:34 AM
That must've been a really annoying day.

For your fucking waitress! Srsly, you order the entire menu, probably making her work her sorry ass off and then you don't tip her? When you work I bet you'd be totally pissed if you didn't get your paycheck, so when you make a waitress work for you -- you had better tip her. If you don't have enough money to tip for service, don't go out to eat at a restaurant.


p.s. oh hai guyz i'm back.

Sin Studly
08-13-2007, 03:58 AM
And I didn't have any cash money with which to tip the waiter at the buffet (where I helped myself to every damn thing I wanted, so what the heck's the big deal if I don't give her these five bucks or so.), and despite my many many apologies, I think she was rather close to slapping my head off.

Sounds like she's a prey you'll never catch.

Paint_It_Black
08-13-2007, 04:32 AM
Why the fuck were you intending to tip at a buffet anyway, faggot. Don't tip.

If everyone stops tipping then employers will have to actually pay a real wage. That goes for everywhere, though I'll admit I now just go with the flow and leave a little something.

But not at buffets. I like those ones where you can't get your own plates, they make someone bring them to you. Basically, they're desperate to have their employees do something you might feel makes them eligible for tips. The greatest part is that waiting for some tard to bring you a plate is actually worse service than just grabbing one yourself whenever you feel like it. It just pisses me off and makes me even less likely to tip.

I'd leave the biggest tip ever to someone who just brought me 5 plates and a gallon jug of water then left me alone. Seriously.

All About Eve
08-13-2007, 05:48 AM
Why the fuck were you intending to tip at a buffet anyway, faggot. Don't tip.
This is what I was thinking. Who even has a waiter/waitress at a buffet? Unless Canada has some weird fucking buffets, you literally help yourself for them.

Anyways, hope it worked out. You can usually check your balance online; try that to see your budget.

Paint_It_Black
08-13-2007, 06:40 AM
I assumed he's speaking of the ones where they bring you plates and drinks, and generally act slightly like a waitress in order to solicit tips.

Tired_Of_You
08-13-2007, 07:23 AM
I remember reading this at 4-5 am and not understanding anything. I don't understand much at the moment, is it normal?

Sinister
08-13-2007, 08:23 AM
Waitress indeed. English second language, plus I was tired when I wrote this.


Why the fuck were you intending to tip at a buffet anyway, faggot. Don't tip. I initially thought I wouldn't. But then I saw the little TIP : ___ line on the bill, and assumed I sort of had to.


Anyways, hope it worked out. You can usually check your balance online; try that to see your budget.

I'll just call 1-800-whatever and demand that my card be reactivated.

JohnnyNemesis
08-13-2007, 08:27 AM
I agree that managers should pay a decent wage, but a few people refusing to tip isn't going to make that difference. So yeah, tip. Always tip, aand if possible, tip generously.

One thing I hate is when the food is horrible. You're tipping for service, not food, so if the waiter or waitress did a really great job, I generally tip well even if the food sucked.

Sinister
08-13-2007, 08:37 AM
How awesome, the bank just called me. And yes, it was because of some possible fraud issue. But I'm working too damn much today and tomorrow so I'll have to wait until wednesday to get a new one.

Feel free to continue the discussion on how tipping in a buffet is inappropriate.

nieh
08-13-2007, 09:02 AM
I initially thought I wouldn't. But then I saw the little TIP : ___ line on the bill, and assumed I sort of had to.
If you pay with a credit card, you can write an amount in there and have it charged there instead of having to give money directly to the waitress. It might be a little more of a hassle for the waitress, but they still get the money so it's not a big deal.


I agree that managers should pay a decent wage, but a few people refusing to tip isn't going to make that difference. So yeah, tip. Always tip, aand if possible, tip generously.

One thing I hate is when the food is horrible. You're tipping for service, not food, so if the waiter or waitress did a really great job, I generally tip well even if the food sucked.

True. I hate when places have shitty service for no reason though. Like, I don't mind when they're obviously understaffed or the place is packed because that's totally understandable, in fact I normally tip better under those circumstances. But if there's 3 waiters and only 2-3 tables with people at them, I don't expect to have to wait 30 minutes between times that I even see my waiter's face.

Endymion
08-13-2007, 09:33 AM
How awesome, the bank just called me. And yes, it was because of some possible fraud issue. But I'm working too damn much today and tomorrow so I'll have to wait until wednesday to get a new one.

to get a new one? just tell them to reactivate the one you've got.

Sinister
08-13-2007, 09:47 AM
Yeah, should have said "to sort things out", I'm keeping the card I have if it's possible.

wheelchairman
08-13-2007, 09:56 AM
Word of advice sinister, when you mention your loads of money it might come off as an insecurity thing. Humility is always charming. Unless you're talking to snobs.

Jakebert
08-13-2007, 10:40 AM
There's a large part of me that wants Sinister phone number so I can call him and leave him horribly threatening voicemails.

HeadAroundU
08-13-2007, 10:54 AM
Here you go, 922-0621. :D

Tired_Of_You
08-13-2007, 10:56 AM
I think that explains why you shouldnt post your phone number online, but I expect your post to be edited.

Number still there? Haha. I thought it wouldn't by now.

Sin Studly
08-13-2007, 11:06 AM
Sinister ;


So, sinister has a girlfriend now, and he's like super eager to talk about her... he's been IMing everyone possible, and your comment in his thread is gonna make him respond with something like "no I have an eternal prey now"... he likes to talk about how "far" he's gotten with her and stuff... so like, you should delete the comment about the prey, haha... because he was also blabbing to me (after I told him I didn't care even) about how he wanted to make a thread about having a girlfriend... although it might be funny if he started talking about her? but probably annoying :P

Consider yourself duly warned. Thank you.

Sunny
08-13-2007, 11:09 AM
oh god, you crazy kids.

JohnnyNemesis
08-13-2007, 11:23 AM
Sinister, stop sharing tidbits of your personal life so willingly, with just about everyone. Seriously.

Paint_It_Black
08-13-2007, 01:53 PM
So yeah, tip. Always tip, aand if possible, tip generously.

Yeah, yeah. I tip. But remember, I'm not originally from the US, so the whole tipping thing is still bizarre to me.

But seriously, would you tip someone at a buffet for bringing you a couple of plates and maybe one glass of water when you would have preferred to get it yourself anyway?

And tipping a percentage of the overall bill. Where did that come from? Bringing me a $6 burger or $20 steak requires the same amount of effort from the server. Why tip more for expensive food? It would be wrong to assume that just because I happen to be buying a steak I must have plenty of money.

JohnnyNemesis
08-13-2007, 02:05 PM
Your awesome points are only reminding me that, more often than I'd like to admit, I submit to societal expectations without really giving it much thought. We all do it, of course. But yeah, I agree.

Tizzalicious
08-13-2007, 02:09 PM
In Denmark tipping isn't common, and I would only tip in places I go to regularly.

I'm more concerned by the amount of stupid warning pm's sent about lately...

-Per

mrconeman
08-13-2007, 02:21 PM
Nobody here tips, it's just really un-heard of. I used to tip at this one place, because it was the best fucking eatery on the planet. Me and my friends used to go there absolutely every single Saturday morning for breakfast. We knew the people there after awhile and even got to just say "the usuals" and they knew what to bring, it was great.
Then some stupid food court opened and they lost their business and had to close, my Saturday mornings still haven't recovered. It was a Beatles themed cafe called Strawberry Fields, so that song has extra meaning to me now.
Strawberry Fields forever :( :(

JohnnyNemesis
08-13-2007, 02:27 PM
Do you folks not tip as often because waiters and waitresses actually get paid a decent wage where you folks are from, or is it because tipping just isn't common for the reasons Richard mentioned earlier?

mrconeman
08-13-2007, 02:34 PM
It's probably a bit of both. Though I really don't know what the average wage for the job is here. It seems like an odd concept to me, but it's understandable if someone really is making an absurdly crap wage for providing you a service. I just know growing up I don't think I ever seen my parents tip anywhere very often, but then I don't normally eat at fancy places, so again it may be more common than I know of. I just know I tipped at that place because the people were friendly, and they made the food then served it themselves.

All About Eve
08-13-2007, 02:34 PM
I do tip by percentages, but I decide the percentage based on how the service was. Crappy service may get 10%. Good service may get more.

nieh
08-13-2007, 02:41 PM
Though I really don't know what the average wage for the job is here. It seems like an odd concept to me, but it's understandable if someone really is making an absurdly crap wage for providing you a service.

Minimum wage here is like $7.50 per hour for regular jobs and like $2.75 for waiters/waitresses, so that's why tipping is such a big deal over here.

Llamas
08-13-2007, 02:57 PM
A LOT of restaurants in the US pay their employees with the expectation that their tips will bring them up to minimum wage. Like Nieh said, I've had friends who worked at places where they made around $3 an hour, when min wage is around $6... and they're expected to compensate that in tips. I've never even met someone who made more than minimum wage at a serving job before tips. The best I've seen is someone who made min wage before tips, and then brought that up.

When I went to Austria, it took me a while to get used to not really tipping. They only round up to the nearest euro so they don't have to get change back (if anything)... no real tipping. So I got really used to that, and now it's weird getting used to tipping again.

That said, I like the tipping thing. When I was abroad, I noticed that servers had no incentive to be good. I VERY rarely had a good server over there, and when I did, I ended up leaving a tip (maybe a little under 10%). Most of the servers wouldn't come to your table for a long time, take your order, bring it to you, and ignore you the rest of the time. If you needed something, you pretty much had to go to the counter and ask someone. And when you wanted the bill, it took them forever to come... usually we'd get up and put on our coats and pretend to be leaving, which would finally attract them over. So, there was just no incentive to do a good job.

Nina
08-13-2007, 03:00 PM
In Denmark tipping isn't common, and I would only tip in places I go to regularly.

Same here. The tip is included in the price at most places, that's at least the experience I made.

Slightly off-topic: I dunno if I remember correctly, but: when I was in Canada, I wanted to buy a top, and I was happy about the price that was on the price tag...when I went to pay the woman tried to explain to me that I still have to add tax to said price. Is it true that the total price is not written on the tag? Or is that a false memory? Man, that was a long time ago.

Mannen som blev en gris
08-13-2007, 03:01 PM
Tipping is something most people do here in Sweden, though I bet that's just because of our wannabe-America-ism. Waiters, but also taxi drivers. But not as much as people do in America - I think 10% might be considered a lot here. Not sure though, since I've never done it myself.

I remember when we were in London, and they had those portable credit card things at the restaurants, and they were like "press here and this blah blah blah", and at this one place, the waitress asked, with her ugly Russian accent, "How much do you want to tip me?". Awkward silence. My dad tried to say that he wanted to leave it in cash instead but she had a hard time understanding that. It wasn't exactly a nice restaurant either - just this lame little thing at the airport.

JohnnyNemesis
08-13-2007, 03:02 PM
Is it true that the total price is not written on the tag?

True .

Llamas
08-13-2007, 03:03 PM
Same here. The tip is included in the price at most places, that's at least the experience I made.

Slightly off-topic: I dunno if I remember correctly, but: when I was in Canada, I wanted to buy a top, and I was happy about the price that was on the price tag...when I went to pay the woman tried to explain to me that I still have to add tax to said price. Is it true that the total price is not written on the tag? Or is that a false memory? Man, that was a long time ago.

Haha, yeah. Over here, the tax is added on at the counter. I didn't even realize that other places added it in to the total price until I left! But our sales tax is so low (around 5-6%) that it's not that big of a deal. If they did that in Europe, the prices would be complete lies on the tags! It totally sucks, though... when something says it's $4.99, I take out a 5... then I get to the counter, and they're like "uhh, $5.25". Stupid. :P

JohnnyNemesis
08-13-2007, 03:04 PM
Sales tax is 8.25% here.

... :(

Mannen som blev en gris
08-13-2007, 03:04 PM
What the hell is the point of that? About the total price not being on the tag, I mean.

Nina
08-13-2007, 03:06 PM
Haha, yeah. Over here, the tax is added on at the counter. I didn't even realize that other places added it in to the total price until I left! But our sales tax is so low (around 5-6%) that it's not that big of a deal. If they did that in Europe, the prices would be complete lies on the tags! It totally sucks, though... when something says it's $4.99, I take out a 5... then I get to the counter, and they're like "uhh, $5.25". Stupid. :P

You're right. In Germany it's 19%, I guess I dont need to explain any further, haha.

Man, I think that's a silly system. Can someone enlighten me why they do that? I mean, we have the price without tax written on every bill, basically in bold, so nobody will miss how much it would cost without the 19%. That makes more sense to me :(

Llamas
08-13-2007, 03:07 PM
Sales tax is 8.25% here.

... :(

I'd feel bad, but I think the taxes in Europe are in the 20% ranges or thereabouts... so damn high.


What the hell is the point of that? About the total price not being on the tag, I mean.
I have noooo idea.

mrconeman
08-13-2007, 03:08 PM
Get you to the counter with the item, not knowing how much it will cost, so when you find out its more than you thought, you're too embarrassed to be like "well no, I'll just put that back".

nieh
08-13-2007, 03:09 PM
Same here. The tip is included in the price at most places, that's at least the experience I made.

Slightly off-topic: I dunno if I remember correctly, but: when I was in Canada, I wanted to buy a top, and I was happy about the price that was on the price tag...when I went to pay the woman tried to explain to me that I still have to add tax to said price. Is it true that the total price is not written on the tag? Or is that a false memory? Man, that was a long time ago.

That's true. Sales tax is not included in the price you see on the tag. Somep laces like NJ, things considered necessities (like food and clothes) don't get taxed, but everything else does.

Llamas
08-13-2007, 03:10 PM
Get you to the counter with the item, not knowing how much it will cost, so when you find out its more than you thought, you're too embarrassed to be like "well no, I'll just put that back".

haha that probably works on foreigners, but if you live here, you usually add on the tax in your head. At least I do. On small items, it doesn't matter, but like when I bought my creative zen, it was $299, and then after tax it was like $315. But I knew that was coming.

edit: oh yeah, in some places, certain things aren't taxed. In Wisconsin, we have no clothing tax, and in Minnesota there's no food tax.

mrconeman
08-13-2007, 03:12 PM
Foreigners/stupid/impressionable people. I still suspect thats the only reason.

Nina
08-13-2007, 03:13 PM
In Wisconsin, we have no clothing tax

Now I know where to move to.

Llamas
08-13-2007, 03:14 PM
Foreigners/stupid/impressionable people. I still suspect thats the only reason.

From an American perspective, aren't those all the same? ;)


Now I know where to move to.

Yeah! Come to Wisconsin! :D

nieh
08-13-2007, 03:14 PM
Delaware there's no sales tax in general.

JohnnyNemesis
08-13-2007, 03:15 PM
New York doesn't have a clothing tax either, woop woop.

And the whole "tax not included on the price tag" thing really isn't a huge deal here. Sure, it'd make more sense to have the total price on there, but everyone (unless this is their first time being a consumer of any sort) expect to pay a little extra for whatever it is they're buying. It's not like this is a new thing.

Vera
08-13-2007, 03:31 PM
I hate added tax thing. It's why I loathe shopping at Amazon.co.uk - stupid VAT makes me feel so uncertain about how much I'll end up paying. VAT + shipping can easily ad over 10 quid to my order, for fuck's sake. :(

I like Finnish system, tax mentioned on receipt but price tag is always tax + price.

Sunny
08-13-2007, 04:28 PM
regarding tipping... i tip on both continents, because i feel it's the courteous thing to do. 15% if i particularly enjoyed the service.
srsly... it's just rude not to do it. like, if you can't afford to tip, you obviously shouldn't be eating out in the first place.

Llamas
08-13-2007, 04:41 PM
regarding tipping... i tip on both continents, because i feel it's the courteous thing to do. 15% if i particularly enjoyed the service.
srsly... it's just rude not to do it. like, if you can't afford to tip, you obviously shouldn't be eating out in the first place.

Be careful, though. In some countries, it's actually rude TO tip. I don't remember where, but I've known people who went to countries and tipped, and the waiter was insulted. Like, it's somehow condescending. In Western Europe, though, they usually just get really excited, haha. My friend came to visit me, and at the first restaurant we went to, she tipped 18%... the lady was like "OH MY GOD! Thank you!!!!" and had this huge grin. My friend didn't get why the lady was so happy... later I told her you don't really tip in Austria... haha.

Sunny
08-13-2007, 04:49 PM
the only countries i've ever really got to eat out in were Poland (duhduh), France, Canada and Switzerland, and they all seemed rather thrilled with my tippage. ;p so i'm assuming i'm safe in the EU area. if i'm going to like, Tibet, (rly rly wanna go) i'll be sure to do my research.

Homer
08-13-2007, 05:29 PM
I don't think they put the tax on the tag because taxes can always change.

Also, tipping here is mandatory. I don't usually think about the whole 10% thing, I just usually just add a dollar for every 5 for the meal unless it goes above 30 bucks, or something. A 15 dollar meal would get a 3 dollar tip. If it goes above 30, then I'll start to think.

Except I don't tip in buffets (WTF!!?11). I've never heard of tipping in a buffet.

Sunny
08-13-2007, 05:39 PM
i dunno, this place i went to recently had a buffet option... i didn't pick it, but i saw people who did, and the staff still took care of them - brought them drinks, refilled, etc. so i'd say a tip would be nice in a situation like that.

Paint_It_Black
08-13-2007, 05:56 PM
Man, I think that's a silly system.

It is. A very silly system indeed. And it causes problems for more than just foreigners. Quite often I have people come to get a room at the hotel I work at, and I tell them the rate, and I usually remind them that tax isn't included in that. Then they're still surprised when they get the total amount. One guy a couple of nights ago had to leave and get more money because the tax made the total higher than he had been prepared for.


like, if you can't afford to tip, you obviously shouldn't be eating out in the first place.

That kind of attitude is offensive, to put it politely. It's no more valid than saying "like, if you expect me to tip, you should obviously add it automatically into my bill". Except what I said makes more sense.


Do you folks not tip as often because waiters and waitresses actually get paid a decent wage where you folks are from, or is it because tipping just isn't common for the reasons Richard mentioned earlier?

Well, I can only speak for England, but yeah servers get paid for the job they do like anyone else. They aren't paid shit and then expected to survive on the generosity of customers. I can't even adequately explain how ridiculous I find this system in the US.


A LOT of restaurants in the US pay their employees with the expectation that their tips will bring them up to minimum wage.

But, if the tips do NOT bring them up to minimum wage, aren't they required to pay their employees minimum wage? I had a feeling that's how it worked, though I should look into it.

Edit: I just want to add that I entirely agree with tipping for particularly good service. I just don't like being expected to tip for all service, even it's it's just barely adequate. Especially to the extent that employers don't pay their employees enough and expect me to do it for them.

Another irritation of mine is when a server doesn't bring you your change. Sure, maybe it's only 50 cents, whatever. It's still my change and I want it back, please, unless I've specifically stated otherwise. When they do that to me I refuse to leave anything extra. If they want to keep my 50 cents then good for them, that's now their tip.

And I should also add that most of my jobs have been in the service industry. So it's not like I just don't understand how hard their jobs are and blah blah blah. I know they do hard jobs. So do I. And I pride myself on giving exceptional service to every customer without ever expecting a tip, and I would never automatically keep someone's change.

JohnnyNemesis
08-13-2007, 06:03 PM
Well, I can only speak for England, but yeah servers get paid for the job they do like anyone else. They aren't paid shit and then expected to survive on the generosity of customers. I can't even adequately explain how ridiculous I find this system in the US.

I see. It's ridiculous, and sometimes I hate tipping when my pockets are light (which is all the time), but I DO like the idea of showing extra appreciation to the people who serve and wait on us. I think whether the gratitude is shown with money, politeness, or just a clear explanation of this appreciation that stretches beyond just mechanically repeating "yeah, thanks", it's nice. For the record, I think this appreciation should be shown at more than just restaurants (supermarkets, auto repair shops, everywhere, just everywhere).


But, if the tips do NOT bring them up to minimum wage, aren't they required to pay their employees minimum wage? I had a feeling that's how it worked, though I should look into it.

You'd be surprised at the kind of shit employers can get away with.

Paint_It_Black
08-13-2007, 06:11 PM
but I DO like the idea of showing extra appreciation to the people who serve and wait on us. I think whether the gratitude is shown with money, politeness, or just a clear explanation of this appreciation that stretches beyond just mechanically repeating "yeah, thanks", it's nice. For the record, I think this appreciation should be shown at more than just restaurants (supermarkets, auto repair shops, everywhere, just everywhere).

I agree with you wholeheartedly. By the way, check out the edit on my previous post in case you missed it.

nieh
08-13-2007, 06:12 PM
You'd be surprised at the kind of shit employers can get away with.

The first time my brother got a job at a restaurant, he was the cashier. All he did was take the people's bills and money and give them their change. The place paid him like he was a server and told him he would make the rest up in tips which didn't happen because who the hell tips the cashier when they already tipped the waiter/waitress? He left there after like 2 weeks.

Sunny
08-13-2007, 06:16 PM
That kind of attitude is offensive, to put it politely. It's no more valid than saying "like, if you expect me to tip, you should obviously add it automatically into my bill". Except what I said makes more sense.


i'm sorry if you're offended, but i stand by it. going out to eat is an experience which, at least in the countries i know, involves expressing monetary gratitude to the person who acts as your host, guides the experience and generally affects the quality of your evening. they're an important part of the package, and tipping them is acknowledging that. if you literally don't have the money to tip them, you obviously cannot afford the whole experience. however, if you CAN spend money on a dinner out, you can surely spare the $10 for the tip.

tips added to the bill are irritating, because what if the service was completely unacceptable?

All About Eve
08-13-2007, 06:22 PM
Lots of places will automatically add the tip into the bill if there's a party of a certain number, like 8 or so, or more. While that's kind of convenient, I don't like it because the server knows they're automatically getting that 15 or 18% just because of the numbers, regardless of the service they provide.

Tennessee has around a 9% sales tax, but it's buffered by not having an income tax. Georgia's sales tax is only 6%, but we have an income. Supposedly it evens out about the same.

Paint_It_Black
08-13-2007, 08:20 PM
tips added to the bill are irritating, because what if the service was completely unacceptable?

Yeah, sorry, I didn't really mean that. I meant more that they should raise their menu prices if necessary, pay their employees an adequate wage, and not rely on tips at all. Then tips become a nice added bonus for exemplary service. That's what I meant by including it in the price.


if you CAN spend money on a dinner out, you can surely spare the $10 for the tip.

I eat out regularly. Not for the experience of it, but simply because I have to eat. It's so much simpler than going to the grocery store, buying my food, then coming home and cooking it for myself. When you add up the cost of the groceries, the cost of gas for getting to and from the store, and the time lost shopping, cooking, and cleaning up after myself I find it sensible to eat out more than I eat at home. I don't have a lot of money though, and like JN, when it comes time to tip it can be a bit painful.

Hopefully I've made it clear though that I just strongly dislike the system. To me, the way it works in England makes a lot more sense.

Rag Doll
08-13-2007, 09:29 PM
Quite often I have people come to get a room at the hotel I work at, and I tell them the rate, and I usually remind them that tax isn't included in that. Then they're still surprised when they get the total amount. One guy a couple of nights ago had to leave and get more money because the tax made the total higher than he had been prepared for.

hotel taxes are insane. i just booked a few hotel rooms cause i'll be going to concerts out of state. and jesus fucking christ, the taxes on that stuff is ridiculousssss. i was not happy.



But, if the tips do NOT bring them up to minimum wage, aren't they required to pay their employees minimum wage? I had a feeling that's how it worked, though I should look into it.


i used to be a waitress. i made more than most ($5/hr, cause i also answered phones and stuff)...but wasn't paid more if i didn't make it up in tips. and very rarely did i get tips, cause it was a super casual italian restaurant that was also a pizzeria. people don't really tip much in those kind of places =\.

i tip *very* well. cabbies, bartenders (it ALWAYS pays to tip the bartender well), waiters, etc. cause like, i know how much it sucks to wait tables and get nothing. i had a super nice waitress the other night at my local diner and tipped her 30%. *shrug*

JohnnyNemesis
08-13-2007, 10:00 PM
(it ALWAYS pays to tip the bartender well)

Yesss. At my regular place, I always get at least two free drinks per visit, and I'm pretty sure it's thanks to my prior history of generous tipping + friendly, but professionally distant conversation.

Either that or the smokin' hot girl behind the bar totally has a thing for scrawny Dominicans with bad posture.

Hmm. Maybe I should only include the latter if I retell that story...

Llamas
08-13-2007, 10:05 PM
There is a bar/grill that we used to always go to in Minneapolis, and waiters learned a thing or two, since we went there every week... if they gave us free refills on our drinks, they were getting a nice tip. If they charged us for refills, they weren't getting much of a tip at all.

The only time I won't tip is if the waiter/waitress totally fucked things up. Brought me the wrong food after a long wait, messed up my order, etc. One time, the bartender LOST my credit card, and after waiting a half hour for them to find it, they charged my card twice, plus charged the group tab. They didn't get a tip.

I don't feel okay with not tipping the server because the corporation is unfair. Sure, it's really crappy of these places to not pay their servers minimum wage before tips, but me not tipping is not hurting the assholes... it's hurting the server. I prefer to just avoid establishments where I know they treat their employees like that... such as Perkins.

ninthlayer
08-13-2007, 11:21 PM
it ALWAYS pays to tip the bartender well
One of my regular bartenders does card tricks for me and RickyCrack.

Nina
08-14-2007, 12:23 AM
I meant more that they should raise their menu prices if necessary, pay their employees an adequate wage, and not rely on tips at all. Then tips become a nice added bonus for exemplary service. That's what I meant by including it in the price.


That's exactly how it works in Germany as well, and I think it's appropriate.

Another example that comes to mind: hairdressers. They do get tipped over here, but not a crazy amount of 10€ and up (someone mentioned 10$ earlier? But to be fair, 10€ is more than 10$). I just dont like the idea of employee's having to depend on tips, I think it's unfair. The employers should pay them directly.

I dont really consider eating out a whole experience. I consider eating out something I do when I dont cook, and when I want to get out of home. If it ever becomes an experience, it's certainly not the waiter/waitress who plays any role in it? I always tip, and I like to show my appriciation like that, but I wont tip more than what is considered appropriate in Germany, which is nowhere near as much as 10$.

Vera
08-14-2007, 01:13 AM
There's something backward about my tip habits, I'll admit. Like, technically I should be tipping the pizzeria type of places that don't really have a very upstanding restaurant image as people in the downtown fancier restaurants probably make a big enough buck without my student-y tips.

But it just feels more appropriate to tip at restaurants that actually have a restaurant feel instead of a bar feel.

I still have to talk my mum into tipping at all.

Finnish restaurant culture is still in its cradle, to be honest, but I think waitressing is a good enough job over here. I think you even need some sort of an education to do it in finer places.

wheelchairman
08-14-2007, 02:16 AM
VAT (sales tax) in my country is 25%, you're all pussies.

p.s. and when I'm in your countries, it feels like I've gone to some 3rd world country with no real economy.

Sunny
08-14-2007, 07:03 AM
Another example that comes to mind: hairdressers. They do get tipped over here, but not a crazy amount of 10€ and up (someone mentioned 10$ earlier? But to be fair, 10€ is more than 10$). I just dont like the idea of employee's having to depend on tips, I think it's unfair. The employers should pay them directly.

I dont really consider eating out a whole experience. I consider eating out something I do when I dont cook, and when I want to get out of home. If it ever becomes an experience, it's certainly not the waiter/waitress who plays any role in it? I always tip, and I like to show my appriciation like that, but I wont tip more than what is considered appropriate in Germany, which is nowhere near as much as 10$.


well, i dunno. i don't eat out a whole lot, so when i do, i try to find a place that will offer an actual experience and not just a plate of food. if someone is kind and accomodating, helps you choose wine, explains the menu/ingredients in detail, offers to customize your dish, brings you drinks the *second* you run out and makes sure you feel totally at home, relaxed and taken care of... well, that's certainly quite a large part of the dinner.

and dude... how much ARE haircuts in Germany? because here, at nicer salons, $5-10 is what you tip the shampoo lady.

killer_queen
08-14-2007, 07:57 AM
Sunny, the first thing that people who come back from US say is "get a haircut before you go there". I heard that hairdressers are riddiculously expensive in America.

Tipping isn't that common in Turkey if you're not going to fancy places. But I always tip when I go to the casual restaurants and bars since I worked just for one day at my friend's café as a waitress. God, I was reaaally exhausted at the end of the day. Since than, not tipping a pretty high amount of money seems real cruel to me.

Sunny
08-14-2007, 08:06 AM
srsly. a few friends of mine (back in Poland) worked as waitresses (with Masters degrees... hi2u Eastern Europe) and they said it was incredibly hard and demanding. they only made *a bit* of money off of foreign tourists because my fellow countrymen... well *sigh*. their behavior leaves much to be desired, to say the least. if you're going to eat at a fancy touristy restaurant, dick, pay up.

besides i'd just feel like a huge cock if someone is trying to pamper me and make my dinner nice and i don't reward them for it.

might be true about the haircuts being sexpensive here. last time i got my hair cut in Poland it was like 40 euro... in the US, twice that.
man, i remember when charlie worked for b&b and he got free haircuts, "tip only", which was usually 30-40 bucks. lollercoaster!

Rag Doll
08-14-2007, 08:21 AM
yeah. the amount of money it is to get your hair cut or dyed here is cuh-razy. getting my hair dyed red was a few hundred dollars. so happy one of my best friends is a hairstylist. she dyes and cuts my hair and i just take her to lunch. weeee.

Sunny
08-14-2007, 08:25 AM
what i really need is a beautician friend, because paying $80 or so for a plain old facial (no special treatments or peels) is nothing short of ridiculous. rar.

Paint_It_Black
08-14-2007, 09:56 AM
hotel taxes are insane. i just booked a few hotel rooms cause i'll be going to concerts out of state. and jesus fucking christ, the taxes on that stuff is ridiculousssss. i was not happy.

I would guess it varies by state. Here in Kansas, when I sell a hotel room at an $89 rate it comes out to $100.98 with tax. To me that doesn't seem too bad.

Here's a question for everybody. I just ordered pizza, and the total is $27.12
Assuming it arrives on time, how much would you tip? I think pizza delivery people make decent money. And it's not like they're serving me, they're just delivering something to my apartment. I don't tip the mailman and he does the same thing. So what would you consider an appropriate amount?

Sunny
08-14-2007, 09:59 AM
i'd say five bucks?

Little_Miss_1565
08-14-2007, 09:59 AM
For food delivery, I usually tip $3, unless it was a huge amount then I'd tip more, or just a sandwich from across the street I'd tip $2.

Rag Doll
08-14-2007, 10:36 AM
I would guess it varies by state. Here in Kansas, when I sell a hotel room at an $89 rate it comes out to $100.98 with tax. To me that doesn't seem too bad.

well. i booked a room for $249. with the tax, it came to $290. i was like *eep*. the room will probably be worth it, but still.


i'd say five bucks?

agreed.

Sunny
08-14-2007, 11:01 AM
i had the same (rather shitty) hotel experience in baltimore... $300 a night, 2 nights, total bill was $682. wtf.

Paint_It_Black
08-14-2007, 11:02 AM
well. i booked a room for $249. with the tax, it came to $290. i was like *eep*. the room will probably be worth it, but still.

Yeah, that seems like a lot of tax. For that price, please tell me that's a suite, ideally with a jacuzzi in the room, in a really nice hotel.


For food delivery, I usually tip $3

That's what I went with. The rest of you are either crazy generous or I'm just a cheap bastard. Well, maybe a bit of both.

Edit:


i had the same (rather shitty) hotel experience in baltimore... $300 a night, 2 nights, total bill was $682. wtf.

Wow, seems like you and Sam stay at expensive hotels.

Sunny
08-14-2007, 11:14 AM
i didn't book it, my bb's company did (and they're reimbursing us for the trip, so whatev).

but yeah, i guess... although in the area we live, $250 a night is considered very reasonable.

nieh
08-14-2007, 11:16 AM
I've never understood why girls spend so much on their haircuts/dye. When I get my haircut, it costs me like $20. And it's not even that I have short hair like most guys, mine is longer than most girls I know. I understand that styling plays a role in that (I never get mine styled), but why that much?

Little_Miss_1565
08-14-2007, 11:31 AM
You pay for the stylist's experience. It takes for-ev-ah to cut long layers, dude. I pay a shitton for my haircuts but then only get my hair cut like once every six months, so it about evens out for someone with shorter hair who gets it cut more often.

Sunny
08-14-2007, 11:36 AM
when it comes to dying your hair in a salon, it's really a huge production... hence the price.
ok: hair dying at home:

- sunny goes to cvs, buys box for $10, opens box, mixes dye, puts dye on... sloppily. waits 30 mins, rinses off. kthnxbye.

hair dying at a salon, however, is a long and involved process:

- sunny goes to salon
- has color consultation; scalp inspected for dryness/damage, hair examined to determine dye/bleach strength
- stylist calls red hair color expert who pokes hair, decides to use a different mix on top of head and different mix on ends, then mixes a bunch of different dyes to get exactly what sunny wants
- the colorist takes ages to make sure the dye is applied evenly
- sunny sits under heater thingy and is fed tea and cookies.
then the rinsing off, deep conditioning, styling follows.

see? :D

i hate getting my furs dyed at a salon though. really.

JohnnyNemesis
08-14-2007, 11:40 AM
I get the world's best haircut at a local barber shop in the BX for 10 bucks, 13-15 with tip. Of course, since I get a cesar, there's not much to do up there, so it better be simple.

Rag Doll
08-14-2007, 11:41 AM
Yeah, that seems like a lot of tax. For that price, please tell me that's a suite, ideally with a jacuzzi in the room, in a really nice hotel.

it's just a regular room with a king size bed. no jacuzzi, no nothing. however, it is a hilton, which does tend to be a bit pricey and has valet and a minibar and wahwahwah. originally, teh boy and i were going to get a nicer room with a jacuzzi and a bottle of champagne. however, then we bought tickets to another concert in nyc and decided to get a hotel there as well.


and related to josh talking about haircuts. hair salons tend to charge women more than men, no matter how long your hair is. plus, as mentioned, all the styling and if you have a specialist do stuff and whatnot.

H1T_That
08-14-2007, 12:44 PM
Myself and a friend are going away for a few days and we're staying in a travel lodge.(thats travel lodge the hotel chain, not some creepy old wooden lodge in a forest). Anyway, were paying £129 per person per night. All we're getting for that is a basic room.

Whats £129 in $? somewhere in the region of $170?

All things considered, the girls aren't paying THAT much.

T-6005
08-14-2007, 01:11 PM
Do you mean Travelodge, or an entirely different place?

Paint_It_Black
08-14-2007, 02:04 PM
Whats £129 in $? somewhere in the region of $170?

Closer to $250 I'm sure. But then, everything is expensive in the UK.


although in the area we live, $250 a night is considered very reasonable.

I guess I'm just not used to big city prices.

$60 to $80 a night is pretty average around here. The hotel I work at currently is possibly the nicest in town, but we still generally go with a rate of 89 for a standard room. Suites are more in the 150 range, and then our very best room, the Governor's Suite, goes for about 250.

I had some people from California recently ask me why our hotel was so cheap, for being such a nice hotel. They said the same thing back home would cost 200 a night.

F@ BANKZ
08-14-2007, 02:18 PM
The crap! $250 A Night, you know I've just got my first job working for &#163;4 an hour, An Hour, Too much.

Llamas
08-14-2007, 03:49 PM
For pizza delivery... I usually tip 10% on that if it's quick service and my pizza is still hot. Most drivers make min wage, and they get reimbursed gas money (like 50 cents per run, depending on where). They're bringing me food, which takes like 5-10 minutes, not an hour or so like waiters. Delivery drivers make a lot more than someone at a regular restaurant, because they get tips from more people per hour, people seem to tip better for delivery because it SEEMS like they're doing more work, and depending on where the store is, drunk people help a lot. When I used to work in the store for Domino's, my friends would go home on a Saturday night after a 6-8 hour shift with $2-300.

My sister or my aunt usually do my hair if I need something major done... if it's something minor like a trim, I go to great clips or whatever.

An hotels... haha I've never paid for a nice hotel. Whenever I'm paying, I go for the cheapo $50 a night motel or whatever. :)

Endymion
08-14-2007, 04:51 PM
at restaurants i generally tip ~20%. too many of my friends have been waitresses and i know how much shit then go through. also, my general goal is to make the total charge on my card be something rounded off like a straight 50 bucks or whatever, so i'll tip whatever it takes to get it to a nice total.

as for haircuts, i tip (and pay) zero.

killer_queen
08-14-2007, 05:04 PM
Have you guys ever seen one of those people who ask for tip? Because I always get them. The guys who bring flowers for example. Hell, I don't even ask for flowers, I don't want them to brought those flowers to me. And people who know me also know that I don't enjoy getting flowers as a gift so generally they're from annoying perverts or from mum so I feel slightly angry when I get flowers. But still, I'm willing to tip the poor guy who has done nothing to me. Until he asks "uhh, my tip?" without waiting for a second after he hands me the flowers. Please tell me that I'm not being mean for closing the door on their face. This is just fucking rude.

Oh and Sunny, if you are having tea and cookies and color expert and shit I don't think those hair dressers are that expensive. Here, those fags cut your hair without listening what kind of hair cut you prefer. But it doesn't even matter because they only know just a few haircuts, they always do the same. And even the fanciest places don't care about your hair's health, they just try to make it look good. I know there are some models who go to Europe to get a decent hair cut.

Paint_It_Black
08-14-2007, 05:28 PM
Here, those fags cut your hair without listening what kind of hair cut you prefer.

You people get it easy. Just cover it with a towel.

HornyPope
08-16-2007, 05:24 AM
I just ordered pizza, and the total is $27.12
Assuming it arrives on time, how much would you tip? I think pizza delivery people make decent money. And it's not like they're serving me, they're just delivering something to my apartment.

Pizza delivery entails a lot of expenses in the form of gas and car maintenance, paying tickets etc. more than any other waiting job. 3$ on top of 27 sounds fair.

zacsta
08-16-2007, 07:37 AM
no tips neseccery here in australia ;)