PDA

View Full Version : US declaration: Armenians were victims of genocide



Little_Miss_1565
10-11-2007, 04:43 AM
Kind of a random resolution to pass, but a congressional committee has voted 27-21 that Turkey committed genocide against the Armenians 97 years ago.

Needless to say, Turkey is taking it reeeally personally.

http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/10/11/turkey.protests/index.html

Serj Tankian is on my TV right now on the Early Show. The news coverage before the interview says that the US is going to put it to a full house vote possibly before the end of the year--but to soften the blow, might pass a resolution of friendship with Turkey beforehand.

OK, first of all. Why pass a "duh" resolution when the country it's against is kind of a key military location right now? And who sits around suggesting that a resolution of friendship is not seriously lame?

But, it is nice that someone is officially recognizing the genocide, especially with this apparent rash of nooses being hung up around the country to intimidate black people.

wheelchairman
10-11-2007, 04:59 AM
It's not really recognizing certain basic human rights as much as it is playing into a realpolitik diplomacy situation between Turkey, Armenia and the rest of the world. Which is really annoying.

Although I think most of the major human rights organizations have recognized it as a genocide and have ignored the Turkish claim of a Turkish genocide committed by Armenians.

sKratch
10-11-2007, 06:22 AM
But because of Armenians, there is no virgin girl left in Istanbul :[

ps I'm sure Serj has been emitting a thick and constant stream of semen into his pants ever since the news broke.

Little_Miss_1565
10-11-2007, 08:19 AM
It's not really recognizing certain basic human rights as much as it is playing into a realpolitik diplomacy situation between Turkey, Armenia and the rest of the world. Which is really annoying.

Although I think most of the major human rights organizations have recognized it as a genocide and have ignored the Turkish claim of a Turkish genocide committed by Armenians.

But I mean why do this when it so affects diplomacy between the US and Turkey, which is kind of key right now if the war in Iraq is really such a priority for the administration. About the rest, I agree completely. Everyone but Turkey considers what happened to the Armenians a genocide.


ps I'm sure Serj has been emitting a thick and constant stream of semen into his pants ever since the news broke.

If I could become magically impregnated from such an event, it would be an honor and a priviledge to bear his hairy son, desitined to become not only a metal god, but a stand up righteous dude.

wheelchairman
10-11-2007, 09:28 AM
But I mean why do this when it so affects diplomacy between the US and Turkey, which is kind of key right now if the war in Iraq is really such a priority for the administration. About the rest, I agree completely. Everyone but Turkey considers what happened to the Armenians a genocide.


I was about to say that the administration probably had some very logical reasons that would benefit America, and then I realized that I live in reality. I would imagine that more than anything it's to maintain to the American people that the American government still hates terrorists and will do anything to prove this. (like creating the axis of evil was an enormous faux-pas in American foreign relations... like ever.)

Little_Miss_1565
10-11-2007, 11:27 AM
I was about to say that the administration probably had some very logical reasons that would benefit America, and then I realized that I live in reality.

I lol'd.


I would imagine that more than anything it's to maintain to the American people that the American government still hates terrorists and will do anything to prove this. (like creating the axis of evil was an enormous faux-pas in American foreign relations... like ever.)

If that's true, it smacks even more of grasping at straws than the Axis of Evil speech.

wheelchairman
10-11-2007, 05:25 PM
If that's true, it smacks even more of grasping at straws than the Axis of Evil speech.

That and pissing off other countries as an election strategy is super-weak. But I mean that's the only reason that I can see for why they would do it. Man American politics sucks.

Mota Boy
10-11-2007, 11:49 PM
I highly doubt that it's part of an election strategy, seeing as the next election is over a year away. More likely, an Armenian lobby in the US just managed to press the issue strongly enough. For any individual congressman, it's hard to argue against it - I mean, it was genocide, against a minority population, and there are few organized Turks in the US to rally against it. Sure, Turkey doesn't like it, but Congress is much more concerned with local politics than international politics, and it's easier to explain to your constituents that you stood up for freedom or whatever than explaining why you caved to foreign pressure over recognizing a genocide.

This doesn't have anything to do with the current administration (the White House, the much more international branch of government, is against it) - it's not rhetoric, as I doubt most Americans know about the Armenian genocide in the first place, and even fewer care. I'm guessing it's just an Armenian lobbyist group that's pushed the issue, and now Congress is backed into a corner, because it's hard to justify bowing to foreign pressure over a human rights issue, especially one that has very diffuse drawbacks - it doesn't cost taxpayers anything, there isn't a sizable Turkish network in the US to oppose it, there aren't a lot of US corporations that have heavy investments in Turkey (who would complain to their local congressperson).

I think this is an example of local politics conflicting with international politics much more than a conscious attempt to affect foreign policy.

Sin Studly
10-12-2007, 03:55 AM
These are our values, you cannot insult them.

wheelchairman
10-12-2007, 04:45 AM
I highly doubt that it's part of an election strategy, seeing as the next election is over a year away. More likely, an Armenian lobby in the US just managed to press the issue strongly enough. For any individual congressman, it's hard to argue against it - I mean, it was genocide, against a minority population, and there are few organized Turks in the US to rally against it. Sure, Turkey doesn't like it, but Congress is much more concerned with local politics than international politics, and it's easier to explain to your constituents that you stood up for freedom or whatever than explaining why you caved to foreign pressure over recognizing a genocide.

This doesn't have anything to do with the current administration (the White House, the much more international branch of government, is against it) - it's not rhetoric, as I doubt most Americans know about the Armenian genocide in the first place, and even fewer care. I'm guessing it's just an Armenian lobbyist group that's pushed the issue, and now Congress is backed into a corner, because it's hard to justify bowing to foreign pressure over a human rights issue, especially one that has very diffuse drawbacks - it doesn't cost taxpayers anything, there isn't a sizable Turkish network in the US to oppose it, there aren't a lot of US corporations that have heavy investments in Turkey (who would complain to their local congressperson).

I think this is an example of local politics conflicting with international politics much more than a conscious attempt to affect foreign policy.

Nah that fits much better. I didn't even think of an Armenian lobby, it's not one of those lobbies you hear so much about. Though naturally it wouldn't *hurt* their stance among the voters.

HornyPope
10-12-2007, 10:40 PM
Red white and blue, gaze in your looking glass
You're not a child anymore
Red, white, and blue, the future is all but past
So lift up your heart, make a new start
And lead us away from here