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View Full Version : A question for all the musicians on this forum...



drummerbecca
07-21-2008, 10:55 AM
Ok, probably another pointless thread as far as everyone else is concerned but it'll help me a lot if some of you answer this.
I'm sure most of you have gathered from my sign in name that I'm a drummer. I've been playing for 13 years and it's always kinda bummed me out that I've never been very technical. Some people have a feel for that, but I just seem to be unable to grasp it. I think I'm a hard hitter, and a solid drummer, but my question to the musicians here is - What do you think is more important? Someone who can hold a solid beat, or someone who can play really amazing fills or jazz chops or whatever, but maybe isn't comfortable just playing straightforward stuff? I guess it could apply to any instrument player really. Anyway, thanks in advance...

Andy
07-21-2008, 01:04 PM
Whenever I think of this, it always brings to mind a great quote from Josh Freese;
"I would rather see someone play a Ramones' song spot-on, with heart and soul, than play some lick they learned out of a book, with all the chops in the world. Chops can be fantastic to watch, but they don't make the whole world tap their foot, cry, or get excited. Chops can make your jaw drop and your eyes widen for a few seconds, but the feeling in the heart is different."

He is so, so right. I'm a beat man rather than a showey percussional masturbation kinda guy.

Llamas
07-21-2008, 01:15 PM
Ok, probably another pointless thread as far as everyone else is concerned but it'll help me a lot if some of you answer this.
I'm sure most of you have gathered from my sign in name that I'm a drummer. I've been playing for 13 years and it's always kinda bummed me out that I've never been very technical. Some people have a feel for that, but I just seem to be unable to grasp it. I think I'm a hard hitter, and a solid drummer, but my question to the musicians here is - What do you think is more important? Someone who can hold a solid beat, or someone who can play really amazing fills or jazz chops or whatever, but maybe isn't comfortable just playing straightforward stuff? I guess it could apply to any instrument player really. Anyway, thanks in advance...

It depends on SO many things. Neither is better, honestly. One important factor is what kind of music you want to play. If you want to be a jazz drummer, technique is far more important. If you want to play timpani in a symphony, both are important, but tone/sound/feeling count way more. If you want to play in a punk band, speed is what matters.

As a musician and a huge fan of music in general, I appreciate everything. I listen for style, technique, speed, tone, etc. Some people are better at one aspect, and some are better at others. Nothing is the MOST IMPORTANT, though. Keep working on what you're not as good at, but give priority to what you excel at.

nameless
07-21-2008, 02:42 PM
Ok, probably another pointless thread as far as everyone else is concerned but it'll help me a lot if some of you answer this.
I'm sure most of you have gathered from my sign in name that I'm a drummer. I've been playing for 13 years and it's always kinda bummed me out that I've never been very technical. Some people have a feel for that, but I just seem to be unable to grasp it. I think I'm a hard hitter, and a solid drummer, but my question to the musicians here is - What do you think is more important? Someone who can hold a solid beat, or someone who can play really amazing fills or jazz chops or whatever, but maybe isn't comfortable just playing straightforward stuff? I guess it could apply to any instrument player really. Anyway, thanks in advance...

im gonna sit on the fence and say its a mixture! everything isnt black and white in music, it all depends on the situation. ultimately people are looking for someone who can keep time, then when required are able to "open up"!

i dont mean to sound like some old guy who cant accept change, but listening to a lot of modern day music, bands seem to lack that groove and togetherness. often the drummer has this odd beat going on or is throwing double bass drum beats in right left and centre and its only being held together by the production.

another quote from josh freese was "you have to walk the line, not too busy but not too basic"!

technical exercises do improve the kinda feel you create in your playing so id say its worth looking into them. it depends what you want from it though. if you wanted to become a session player then time, feel, musical knowledge and technique etc are very important but there are many times when a more hard hitting passionate approach is required!

do you have any examples of your playing we could hear?!

drummerbecca
07-22-2008, 10:40 AM
Wow, so much constructive feedback. Thanks!
I don't want to be a session musician really, although I wouldn't totally rule it out. Bottom line though, is that I probably couldn't, even if I wanted to. I'm entirely self taught, can't read drum tab and know very little in the way of any music theory. Ideally I'd like to be comfortable with whatever level of ability I may have, which is a stage I haven't reached yet. I would like to be a bit more technical, even just to play better fills and stuff, but not necessarily jazz or that sort of thing. Maybe I should consider lessons after all this time...
That's an awesome quote from Josh Freese by the way. Thanks very much for that. I find that quite inspiring considering how technical a drummer he is. I guess it's something that's easy for him to say though :p
I don't have an examples of my playing. I've been meaning to do something like a video portfolio type thing for a while now, but I don't want to just stick random videos on Youtube or whatever. Sod it, I'll probably end up doing it anyway.

Oh, by the way Andy, percussional masturbation...?

Hilarious! :p

zsk
07-22-2008, 11:53 AM
Ok, probably another pointless thread as far as everyone else is concerned but it'll help me a lot if some of you answer this.
I'm sure most of you have gathered from my sign in name that I'm a drummer. I've been playing for 13 years and it's always kinda bummed me out that I've never been very technical. Some people have a feel for that, but I just seem to be unable to grasp it. I think I'm a hard hitter, and a solid drummer, but my question to the musicians here is - What do you think is more important? Someone who can hold a solid beat, or someone who can play really amazing fills or jazz chops or whatever, but maybe isn't comfortable just playing straightforward stuff? I guess it could apply to any instrument player really. Anyway, thanks in advance...

you must love your music and you have do live for music(even not only for your music;))

I play guitar since 4 years...
i got two years lessons
i met s.o. who was that good as me in 2 years,in two months!
but he's arrogant and his guitar-teacher studied in LA
i think even if you want to make punk-rock you should to it with your heart and not with your pourse if you understand what i mean:cool:

drummerbecca
07-22-2008, 12:14 PM
Yeah, I understand (Ich verstehe dich :p) Hehe, sorry, my German is terrible. That is, of course, assuming that you are German. I'm going on the "Holy German Empire" thing. Apologies if I'm wrong...!
I totally agree with everyone in that it should come from the heart, regardless of what you play. I just think people sometimes think you're only saying that because you aren't good at what you do, if you get me.
No offense to any guitarists in here, but it is generally guitarists who are very arrogant. Not all of them though, I've met loads of guitar players who are genuinely humble about their abilities.

Splinter[PI]
07-22-2008, 12:39 PM
I think it's more important to be able to hold a beat. You can change a beat slightly every 4th measure, until it's becoming more a solo than a beat. Just try this. It really helps improving your technical skills.

zsk
07-22-2008, 12:39 PM
i was eleven as i want to learn an instrument,
i thought it's better to learn guitar,because it's the coolest instrument...
now i know that this was the wrong choice!
i think i've got some talent for drums,i'm not bad in playing guitar,i'm able to play every offspring song...
but i can't get a band,because there are sooo much guitarists,and too few punk bands!
every band i asked,they said that they have allready a guitarrist,so i've got no band

i think when i'm a little bit older i'll get the chance to get a band,I'm only 14;)

zsk
07-22-2008, 12:41 PM
(Ich verstehe dich :p) Hehe, sorry, my German is terrible
no you german is good,anyway this sentence
it's grammaticly correct :)
my english is terrible:rolleyes:

wheelchairman
07-22-2008, 01:08 PM
I only like music that is all solos all the time for hours on end.

nameless
07-22-2008, 03:47 PM
theres lots of expressions that come to mind such as, "its not what you play, but how you play it", kinda like its more down to the indivdual.

on the subject of lessons i would recommend them, but again they arent for everyone. i know people who have taught themselves to play really well but others who are self taught havent really got a clue! similarly, ive met people who have had lessons for years who arent very good!

adombomb222
07-22-2008, 10:23 PM
As a drummer myself, I'm disappointed in myself because I jumped in right away and want to play fast and hard, I didn't learn proper techniques and such, keeping rhythms and beats. So now having to go back and re-teach myself stuff, sucks. But I know they way I approached it was right for me, because I got what I first wanted out of that spark was set off which has made me more determined to cover all my bases at least a little. I think I would be able to have more flow and rhythm now if I sat down to learn the technical stuff, but had I done that I would be able to play as fast as I can and play rolls the way I can today. I think itís very important to get yourself a little familiar with everything there is about drumming, I think all aspects of drumming are important. Rhythm and keeping a beat is important. But as said before, work on what you know and develop that. If you can already do something well you canít get any worse. Iím focusing my practicing on basic rhythm techniques. But I work on my rolls all the time.

drummerbecca
07-22-2008, 11:22 PM
At least you've done the hard part, adombomb. Playing hard and fast isn't as easy as just bashing things, which some people think is all thats involved. I don't think I could take lessons though. After 13 years I'm too stuck in my own ways, which is a bad thing and a good thing I suppose. Bad because I'll probably never benefit from someone giving me ideas and tips on how to improve, but good because it means my playing style or whatever hasn't been tainted by someone elses input.
I take it, adombomb, that you're self taught aswell then?
Zsk, don't worry about not finding a band. If you can play drums and guitar then just record some stuff of your own at home. If you can play guitar then bass comes naturally in my opinion, so you have your own one man punk band :)

adombomb222
07-23-2008, 03:28 PM
I took lessons at frist, but it just wasn't for me.

EDIT: Fuck dude, i was tired when i wrote that last night... My gramar is so bad...

Oxygene
07-24-2008, 08:53 AM
Whenever I think of this, it always brings to mind a great quote from Josh Freese;

He is so, so right. I'm a beat man rather than a showey percussional masturbation kinda guy.


Now what the fuck would Josh Freese know about playing drums?! :D

Having said that.. being solid is SO MUCH more important than anything else. If a drummer isn't solid the band is doomed.

Of course being Travis Baker or Josh Freese where you have both is where it's at, but don't be bummed out that you're never going to have that!

It doesn't matter, you can still be an excellent drummer..