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The Talking Pie
08-09-2008, 09:29 AM
So, about a month ago I picked up Aikido, a martial art that I used to do as a kid and then stopped for no good reason.

Who else on here practices martial arts, what do you practice and how would you rate/describe your particular martial art?

bighead384
08-09-2008, 09:31 AM
Lol, well I've done drunk boxing and wrestling before. Anyone ever done that?

nieh
08-09-2008, 09:55 AM
I got up to brown belt (one before black) in Tae Kwon Do but dropped due to various reasons near the beginning of high school. I've been knocking around the idea of trying akido at some point, but I've heard that doesn't require being in shape to the degree that so many other styles do, so if I were to go as a way to stay in shape I might be better off doing another style or going back to Tae Kwon do.

The Talking Pie
08-09-2008, 11:01 AM
My old neighbour was some ridiculously-high Dan grade in Tae Kwon Do, but oddly enough I never trained with him, even though I'm certain I pretty much had the opportunity for one-on-one tuition.

Aikido indeed doesn't require much physical strength, as it uses the attacker's own strength against them, but you're only talking about a lack of meeting brute force with equal brute force; there's still a lot of activity that keeps you in shape, not least of all because half the time you're being the attacker, which obviously does require a degree of strength.

Obviously, I'm going to say that Aikido's awesome and that you should do it, but perhaps Tae Kwon Do would be best if you were already so far along before you stopped?

Pepparoo
08-09-2008, 02:57 PM
So, about a month ago I picked up Aikido, a martial art that I used to do as a kid and then stopped for no good reason.

Who else on here practices martial arts, what do you practice and how would you rate/describe your particular martial art?

I used to do a bit of Kung Fu as a kid, then at 22 I did Karate for a bit. Then in 2003 I did Kuk Sool Won for about 2 years but got bored of it. Started MMA in 2004 and been doing that ever since, had a few amateur fights. I just do it to kill time, plus it's fun strangling people.

Andy
08-09-2008, 07:59 PM
I really wish I had the get up and go to learn Ninjutsu, purely because it is the way of the Ninja, and I'm childish like that.

Pepparoo
08-09-2008, 10:14 PM
I really wish I had the get up and go to learn Ninjutsu, purely because it is the way of the Ninja, and I'm childish like that.

You just wanna be Naruto, don't you? :p

Ryder1234
08-09-2008, 10:28 PM
I really wish I had the get up and go to learn Ninjutsu, purely because it is the way of the Ninja, and I'm childish like that.

Me and my friends always joke about being ninjas. I've been contemplating maybe learning it too.

StayInTheHouseCarl
08-09-2008, 10:35 PM
I was in TaeKwonDo (american taekwondo association) for about 6 years, got up to a second degree black belt. ( i probably could be a 4th degree by now, but i had to quit because it got expensive and we got poor).

It seemed to be more focused on philosophy, and self-improvement, over actual fighting technique. But sparring was my favorite.

Jakebert
08-09-2008, 11:34 PM
It seemed to be more focused on philosophy, and self-improvement, over actual fighting technique. But sparring was my favorite.

I never did martial arts, so I could be wrong, but I was always under the impression that the point wasn't the fighting, but rather the philosophy and self-improvement aspect. I have a friend who is very heavily into martial arts, and he always hates the guys that brag about their fighting ability because he says that's the opposite of the entire thing.

Pepparoo
08-10-2008, 02:37 AM
I never did martial arts, so I could be wrong, but I was always under the impression that the point wasn't the fighting, but rather the philosophy and self-improvement aspect. I have a friend who is very heavily into martial arts, and he always hates the guys that brag about their fighting ability because he says that's the opposite of the entire thing.

That's what's wrong with martial arts in my opinion, at least traditional. You learn fuck all in terms of fighting but you're indoctrinated with all this so called 'philosophy' garbage (which has no place in the 21st century) and so called 'self improvement' (at the expense of your wallet of course).

I'd much rather practice strangling someone over standing in line like a bitch and bowing anyday!

WebDudette
08-10-2008, 02:41 AM
I took kenpo for a while.

We went over self-improvement and philosophy but in the end it was all about kicking ass. I learned how to kick a guy in the nuts and pull his eyes out on the first day.

The Talking Pie
08-10-2008, 06:07 AM
That's what's wrong with martial arts in my opinion, at least traditional. You learn fuck all in terms of fighting but you're indoctrinated with all this so called 'philosophy' garbage (which has no place in the 21st century) and so called 'self improvement' (at the expense of your wallet of course).

I'd much rather practice strangling someone over standing in line like a bitch and bowing anyday!

Any good martial art will teach you first how to avoid a fight, then how to defend yourself against the attack and then only as a last resort how to use force (though still just to end the confrontation).

And if a martial art is taking your money and teaching you nothing useful that you can use in your life then chances are you're studying Bullshido.

Pepparoo
08-10-2008, 06:18 AM
Any good martial art will teach you first how to avoid a fight, then how to defend yourself against the attack and then only as a last resort how to use force (though still just to end the confrontation).

And if a martial art is taking your money and teaching you nothing useful that you can use in your life then chances are you're studying Bullshido.

This is the thing. With a lot of these arts you're thinking you're learning how to fight but in reality, 95% of what you learn won't work or is all just part of the 'syllabus' (even my old Kuk Sool teacher told me this).

Sure, you're learning stuff with these TMA's and I did enjoy Kuk Sool cos we did loads of different stuff (Acrobatic type things, joint locks, pads, forms). At the end of the day though I wanted a combat Martial Art with grappling and Kuk Sool isn't really this (as is the same with a lot of these Kung Fu/TKD type arts). Karate and Judo isn't too bad though but like with everything you get good and poor schools.

The Talking Pie
08-10-2008, 09:16 AM
Hmm... can't say I've really encountered that. So I don't know if I've just been exposed to the few good martial arts, or you've been exposed to a few bad ones.

Everything we learn in Aikido is practical, even if you have to use your imagination a bit (replacing a katana attack with a broken bottle to the head, for instance).

Autonomist
08-10-2008, 10:06 AM
I have two friends who're both ridiculously skillful in their martial arts areas. One of them was ranked 3rd in the world in an international karate tournament, while the other is a certified karate teacher/tutor at only 16 years old. Thankfully they're both incredibly modest about what they can do, but needless to say you don't wanna fuck with us when we go out on the town.

killer_queen
08-10-2008, 02:45 PM
I've done kick-boxing a couple of years ago. It was fun because it didn't have lots of rules or anything. They just taught me how to punch, how to kick and how to avoid them. I'd recommend it to anyone, especially girls since it gives you a little self-confidence.

Pepparoo
08-17-2008, 07:30 AM
Everything we learn in Aikido is practical, even if you have to use your imagination a bit (replacing a katana attack with a broken bottle to the head, for instance).

I think you only know whether or not it's practical if it has been tested on a non-compliant opponent. I know that what I'm taught is going to work on the street and it has done. It's not guaranteed i'll win fights and it's usually the case that if there's 3 of them and 1 of you, you're fucked but at least I know I can give them a good run for their money.

The Talking Pie
08-17-2008, 10:10 AM
I totally agree. Which oddly-enough brings me to a point I was about to raise anyway when I saw that this thread was back up on the first page:

On Sundays I attend a class which is frequented primarily by black belts. I've come to find it a far better learning environment, as I'm surrounded by people who know what they're doing and from whom I won't pick up bad newbie habits. There's also the issue of non-compliance in their attacks, which I love; there are certain Dan students that I always aim to train with, because I know that when they attack me, if I can't execute the technique properly then they won't carry on with what I'm hoping they'll do in response to my actions, etc. They'll either stand their ground and refuse to budge, or I'll end up as the one on the floor.

Jules69
08-17-2008, 03:29 PM
I took karate as a kid, not forvery long though. My husband became a black belt at the age of 13, and now teaches kung fo in slow motion, called tai chi.

Dosix
08-17-2008, 04:00 PM
I am training kick boxing :) for 3 years
and recently I was at the sports camp on which I learnt a bit of Muay thai
For me kick boxing is better but Muay thai is very interesting martial art too

HornyPope
08-17-2008, 10:56 PM
I'm doing MMA which is basically a mix of everything. On mondays, it's a kick boxing, on wednesday and friday it's thai box, on thursday it's jiu jistsu and saturday it's judo. Neither of the classes is really true to the original discpline but that's the point. We just a learn a lot of fighting skills from the different teachers in all kind of situations.

I started off in Kyokushin which I think is a great discipline for beginners (and beyond). It's a full contact sport so it toughens you enough for real fighting. I don't like Akido at all. Yes, you can incorporate the technique you learn but there is more to fighting than using your opponent's own weight against himself. I'll try and reply later to elaborate, my brain doesn't co-operate with me right now.

The Talking Pie
08-18-2008, 11:13 AM
I don't like Akido at all. Yes, you can incorporate the technique you learn but there is more to fighting than using your opponent's own weight against himself.

True; I think the mistake people make is comparing Aikido to fighting martial arts. It's a way to avoid a fight above all else.

When you learn MMA, do you go in-depth with each of the arts, or do you focus on the relevant/important bits in short bursts? Do you also spend a lot of time on how to incorporate the different styles into one another, or is it more the art of learning as much as possible to expand your 'arsenal'?

HornyPope
08-19-2008, 12:45 AM
Very good questions!

I'll make some tea and answer it. Btw, I have a friend in the Canadian forces who drinks to the Queen and the Country. Well, I'll drink to that. I don't really know your Queen and I've only been to your country once. But you know what? I'll drink to it.

Now, the questions.


When you learn MMA, do you go in-depth with each of the arts, or do you focus on the relevant/important bits in short bursts? Do you also spend a lot of time on how to incorporate the different styles into one another, or is it more the art of learning as much as possible to expand your 'arsenal'? You know, MMA is extremely diverse. I have four teachers right now and everyone has his own little focus. Among them, only one has a "tradional, Japanese karate approach" although he also adapted to North American standards. Basically, this means that we do katas, we say "Osu", we stand in "bokso" (mokso?) position before and after the class and we spar according to Kyokshin rules. As far as fighting goes, we spar according to Kyokshin rules, so basically everyone always lowers his guard to defend his body when you fight in close quarters (as opposed to the face) and that's not something that is very practical in real fight. So it something to be mindful of when you do practice martial arts that have their own specific rules that are somewhat different from street rules. It leads to a lot of people, myself included, to picking a number of bad habits such as not keeping our hands up, rellying too much on lower kicks, not knowing how to hold and to grapple an opponent, not knowing how to choke an opponent etc... I mean, how will know how to defend against a takedown if nobody in your discipline knows how to do a takedown? Obviously, these are skills you willl be missing in a real combat/street situation.

Another different thing we do in Karate is practice our kicks and punches from their native positions. I forget what these positions are called, it involves lowering your center of gravity and widening your knees and your feet from the standard 90% angles to 180% angles. It's not taught in many disciplines but I think it's a good position to know. It's actually excellent stretching and it teaches you how to do your kicks from a different position so that's something, I think, a young fighter will benefit to pick up from a karate discipline.

The remaining three teachers are basically MMA fighters. Not very active ones, but they they fought before. One has a background in Kyokshin, and two have background in Muy thai but all three also practiced Judo and Jiu jitsu. So in class, we do like 45-60 minutes of kicks and combination punches on the pad (that's very common among muy thai and kick box fighers) and we also do a round or two of shadow-boxing (again very common). Then we spar for maybe ten rounds. During sparring is when you usually hear a little about strategies from your teacher, you practice your own strategies and techniques to overcome an opponent (learning by applying), and you also pick strategies from your opponent. Some days, we fight by using kicks only (or: one man uses kicks, the other uses only arms). Other days, we practice take downs and fighting on the floor (chockes, arm bars). And then occasionally, we put on our 14oz gloves and shin-pads, our jock-straps and our mouth-guards, and we spar free-style.

To finish off, we do something really fun like push ups (there are like 1000s of ways to do a push up if you have a creative teacher) or abdominal excercises.

And if you're in the mood, you can stay after class and punch a bag for fifteen minutes or something. Today, I punched a wooden bar planted on the side of that same purpose. It hurts but it feels so good... that's probably how women feel during buttseks!!!


So to answer your question, you learn a lot from every style. How you incorporate and do with it to perfect your own fighting style is up to you and depends how you are taught by your teacher. But you know, everyone is going to teach you to shift your weight properly in order to carry out a punch/kick, everyone is going to teach you to pull back your arm or leg after you executed the punch/kick, everyone will teach you how to turn your torso properly for the punch/kick, and everyone is going to make you work on your retaliation and anticipation. The basic thing every student has to know is how to block a sudden attack (you can't always avoid it, sometimes you have to put your arms up to protect against the attack), then shift his weight in central position, and then counter attack in a matter of a second. This is something they teach in practically every discpline, only other discplines also forget to toughen up the body, and this is btw one of the biggest reasons I dislike Akido, among other discplines, namely that their training doesn't toughen your body in the process. I mean, unless you're a fucking guru, you're going to get hit, right? Well, if you never been hit before, how do you know how to take a hit? Sure, it hurts but it's not going to hurt forever. If it hurts now, it means it will hurt less in a real situation. One wise quote I picked in my class is "cry at the dojo, laugh at the battlefield". Yes, this is something I incorporate in my life, or at least try I always try to.

As far as arsenal goes, the more you know--the better you are. Like anything else if life, "you need to be doing it to be good at it" or "practice makes excellent". I don't know which cliche you heard first, but it's so fucking true. When you fight against fighters from different styles and backgrounds, you adapt to them and you learn from them. If you just spent thirty minutes on the floor trying to chocke each other with your belt, well, I guess it's something you can add to your arsenal now. If you find yourself in a similar position in the future, you will most certainly apply the lessons from your previous experiences (failures?) to better your current arsenal now. Diversity makes us stronger, man. Incidentally, our best fighters are from Brazil, Argentina and south America in general, as well couple of Eastern Europe, Afrikans and Caribbean and one Native. Good crowd, man, good crowd.

The Talking Pie
08-19-2008, 01:41 PM
Thats quite interesting; one of my senseis studied karate for a few decades, and I practice alongside some people who've done Jujutsu and whatnot, so I get a lot of those little hints and tips about the right way to attack, etc. My main sensei, a pure Aikidoka, suggests stamping on someone's hand with your boot to get a knife from them, along with the kata-based holds that should accomplish the same. Because like you said, studying kata and abiding by certain 'rules' isn't always the most practical for real-life situations.

And yeah, you're right about arts like Aikido being an expert's game, if you'll allow me to paraphrase. But if you watch a Shihan in action, it's fucking beautiful. So obviously, I'm aiming high.

I'd be quite interested in observing or learning some MMA. Perhaps as the individual arts one at a time, though... to be honest I don't think I could keep up with the kind of thing you've described. The freestyle sparring aspects in particular interest me, because they'll obviously closely/er reflect real-life situations.