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Thomas
04-12-2009, 05:51 PM
So right now i'm in very desperate need of work. Unfortunately, I'm very new to this whole "job searching" thing so I was wondering if anyone had any pointers or advice to lead me in the right direction.

T-6005
04-12-2009, 05:52 PM
Don't work for Vector.

0r4ng3
04-12-2009, 05:55 PM
Don't work for Vector.
http://www.coolrom.com/screenshots/genesis/Vectorman%20(2).gif ?

JohnnyNemesis
04-12-2009, 05:57 PM
Don't put too much faith in the major job sites like Monster or Career Builder. Idealist.org yields decent stuff. Make sure to check company websites as well as job posting sites for openings. Make your cover letter and resumé immactulate. Register with local temp agencies.

WebDudette
04-12-2009, 06:27 PM
If you have to get a job go to telemarketing companies. They will not turn you down. But I've never known anyone to work at those for more then a couple months, it is apparently pretty agonizing.

SweetTatyana
04-12-2009, 06:49 PM
After sending in a resume, if I haven't heard anything in a week or two, I'll find the number and follow up. Everytime I have done this I have gotten a either an interview or a quick call back for one. :)

Oh also, another thing is try and think of some companies you'd like to work for and look for careers directly on their websites because many companies just use their own sites to advertise.

Outerspaceman21
04-12-2009, 06:51 PM
It's tough. The big thing is not to be picky. If an opportunity comes up, take it. I'm still looking and I haven't found shit. THere is a new pizza place, though, and they need pizza delivery drivers. I'm gonna see if I can get that job.

Thomas
04-12-2009, 08:10 PM
Yeah, I'm definitely not looking for a career. I'm just looking for a part-time job to help pay the rent next year. I'll definitely take all of this into consideration, though.

Llamas
04-12-2009, 08:21 PM
Your Uni should have a lot of opportunities. Campuses provide a ton of jobs to keep students busy. They don't pay super great, but you'll find something. I've had two campus jobs, and they were two of my favorite jobs I've ever had.

jacknife737
04-12-2009, 08:27 PM
Check out on campus jobs, there are usually tons of them.

Also, (especially if you're in a uni-town) your local municipality should have a lot of job offers for summer students.

Check out your school's "careers office" those guys get paid to help you find employment.

Keep at it, and good luck.

JohnnyNemesis
04-12-2009, 08:28 PM
Yeah, I'm definitely not looking for a career. I'm just looking for a part-time job to help pay the rent next year. I'll definitely take all of this into consideration, though.

Oh! In that case, definitely follow what llamas just said, it's pretty much on point.

sneedo83
04-12-2009, 08:56 PM
www.usajobs.gov assuming you're living in the US

Thomas
04-14-2009, 01:06 PM
So I've found a few job openings (Home Depot, Target, etc) and I have one more question that I didn't feel needed another thread. I don't yet have a resume and I was wondering if anyone knew of any good templates or outlines to write my resume with. Also, when I'm done writing it, would anyone be willing to look over it? I'll repay you with sexual favors.

Thomas
04-15-2009, 12:05 PM
Thomas! This is ghastly news! Are you telling us you don't know how to build a proper CV? Have never even looked for tips?

Well, a French CV is usually one-page long, includes (relevant only, or if you really have very little, relevant in prominence) professional experience and schooling, skills (whether in languages, computering, etc), extra-prof interests and activities.

Methinks Anglo-Saxon résumés add a referee line - but in France you're supposed to attest of your own suitability. However, you may adduce credentials and other letters of recommendation, if need be.

Address, phone, mail are compulsory... age, photo, marital status and driving license are optional. I don't know how it goes stateside.


*sigh* Yes, I am still quite young and don't have much experience in this field, unfortunately. Is the standard resume only a page long? For some reason, I thought it would be more...

Thomas
04-15-2009, 12:29 PM
Alright. I'll definitely keep that in mind.

But really, I'm likely going to be either working a cash-register or stocking shelves, so I'm sure a quasi-impeccable resume won't kill me...

Llamas
04-15-2009, 01:47 PM
Do nooooot ever write a resume that's more than a page. 90% of employers will not even look at it if it's more than a page. I think it's cause it makes you look arrogant or just plain disorganized.

In Germany, you have to attach a photo. Silly Germans.

XYlophonetreeZ
04-15-2009, 10:48 PM
Do nooooot ever write a resume that's more than a page. 90% of employers will not even look at it if it's more than a page. I think it's cause it makes you look arrogant or just plain disorganized.

Actually, the consensus among everything I've read recently is that the one-page rule is quite outdated. With job markets more competitive now, it's hard for employers to work with one-page resumes because they all start to look alike. That said, if you don't have tons of relevant experience or tons to write about in general, don't overdo it. Keep it concise, and if you do need to go over a page then make sure you have at least a page and a half. Otherwise, cut it down to a page. Too much empty paper = not good. And make sure not to mention everything you did in your previous jobs; just a quick description. That way the information you give them in your cover letter or your interview if you get one will be fresh and more interesting. They read hundreds of resumes and they're gonna forget most of it in the short-term, but if you just regurgitate superfluous information in your interview, their reaction will be "oh yeah. you're that guy." I'm looking for a job myself and it's going OK I suppose. I've had several interviews and only missed a couple of jobs because I couldn't relocate quickly enough to beat out local candidates. I'm getting kind of restless from unemployment. I'm surprised I haven't been posting here more.

Sidewinder
04-15-2009, 11:00 PM
Learn to swim + lifeguard/WSI certify + local Wellness center or w/e = private lessons for 15-20 per hour.

Llamas
04-15-2009, 11:53 PM
Actually, the consensus among everything I've read recently is that the one-page rule is quite outdated. With job markets more competitive now, it's hard for employers to work with one-page resumes because they all start to look alike. That said, if you don't have tons of relevant experience or tons to write about in general, don't overdo it. Keep it concise, and if you do need to go over a page then make sure you have at least a page and a half. Otherwise, cut it down to a page. Too much empty paper = not good. And make sure not to mention everything you did in your previous jobs; just a quick description. That way the information you give them in your cover letter or your interview if you get one will be fresh and more interesting. They read hundreds of resumes and they're gonna forget most of it in the short-term, but if you just regurgitate superfluous information in your interview, their reaction will be "oh yeah. you're that guy." I'm looking for a job myself and it's going OK I suppose. I've had several interviews and only missed a couple of jobs because I couldn't relocate quickly enough to beat out local candidates. I'm getting kind of restless from unemployment. I'm surprised I haven't been posting here more.

Well, I think most of the kind of stuff you listed is exactly why it's best to just keep it one page. If you really do have the background to do a page and a half (and yeah, if you're going to go over a page, it especially looks bad if it's just a line or two), then I can see based on what you said about the economy why it'd be beneficial... but putting every thing you've done on there, like being slam dunk champion of your county, or running a college radio station, or winning a hot dog eating competition*... is generally a bad idea.




*I hope someone gets the references... :mad:

zaithyn
04-16-2009, 04:25 AM
People skills and managerial-organizational skills are at least as important as seo knowlege -- especially when you are working with a big operation instead of a small shop. In one case, I figure 80% of my time is all about getting these "soft factors" to line up with the seo end goal.