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Irish-Rover
11-13-2009, 02:43 PM
Im not sure how man people this will affect(unless you are irish) but the teachers union approved a strike today and it is apparently set for November 24th im not sure what to think but many are saying that the teachers are getting enough as it is

Alison
11-13-2009, 02:52 PM
I'm sure everyone will be delighted for a day off school. At least I would be, if I were still in school.

The Irish government has gone to the shits, and it seems that the people who need the money most are being ripped off. It will take more than a strike to stop Bat O'Keefe. I mean, for universities, sure the fees aren't coming in(yet), but registration fees have gone up since last year.

Llamas
11-13-2009, 02:55 PM
I can't speak specifically about Ireland, but I will say that, in most countries, teachers are majorly underpaid for the work they/we do. In most countries, we make considerably less than the average salary, for a very important job.

Anyway, every time there's a strike, most people say "they make enough as it is". That goes with all strikes.

I think a teachers' strike could be very effective for them. I think that teachers not working can really prove how important they are. It's not like a baseball strike or a writers' strike where people are like "oh shit we can't be entertained by awesome stuff, and if this keeps up, we'll all be bored", but it's like "oh shit nobody's being educated, and if this keeps up, our country will go bankrupt cause nobody has an education." I know I'm biased because I'm in the education line of work, but I do think I support the idea of teachers striking.

wheelchairman
11-13-2009, 03:09 PM
In many countries the qualifications for becoming a teacher are low, and you have people who really shouldn't be teachers anyways.

The Pedagogic Seminar in Denmark is famous for having ridiculously low standards. My friend got in with an average that was barely above failing.

I think teachers' wages should be raised drastically, but so should the requirements for becoming a teacher.

calichix
11-13-2009, 10:31 PM
I can't speak specifically about Ireland, but I will say that, in most countries, teachers are majorly underpaid for the work they/we do. In most countries, we make considerably less than the average salary, for a very important job.

hay! get it girl! I didn't know you were a bonafied teacher now. congratulations!

this makes me feel hella nostalgic.

Llamas
11-14-2009, 02:31 AM
In many countries the qualifications for becoming a teacher are low, and you have people who really shouldn't be teachers anyways.

The Pedagogic Seminar in Denmark is famous for having ridiculously low standards. My friend got in with an average that was barely above failing.

I think teachers' wages should be raised drastically, but so should the requirements for becoming a teacher.

Ah my gawd yes! I agree with this sooo whole-heartedly. I mean, on one hand I do support striking because teachers get screwed on pay... but it really does bother me how many underqualified teachers I see and have had in my life. Make it harder to become a teacher and pay those who actually know how to teach fairly - right now, anyone who doesn't know what else to do or has no special skills decides to become a teacher because they think it seems easy. But it's not.



hay! get it girl! I didn't know you were a bonafied teacher now. congratulations!

this makes me feel hella nostalgic.

:) Thanks! Yeah, I'm an English teacher in the Czech Republic now, and I love it! Nostalgic? Hehe, I guess about the older states of the bbs?

Alison
11-14-2009, 03:08 AM
I definitely agree with teacher's requirements being raised.

Back in primary school, one of our teachers could not speak a word of irish (even though to get into the 'teaching university' of Ireland, you must have an honours level of irish) and she was worse than the students at maths.

In secondary school, my teacher for chemistry didn't seem to understand half the stuff himself and when asked a question he'd always shrug his shoulders. Then he showed his biology students a video of his wife giving birth without her permission and was fired :p

Irish-Rover
11-14-2009, 08:21 AM
Also one of the reasons teachers are planning on striking is that the junior cert might be abolished which woud be a very bad thing as it prepares us for the Leaving Cert.
My sister is currently teaching at the school and she doesnt know what to think of it. by the way i am currently in that school so i will probably be getting the day off.

Alison
11-14-2009, 08:52 AM
Ah now. The Junior Cert is a waste of time really. Do the summer tests and the pres not prepare you enough for the Leaving Cert like?
The JC is way too hyped and made such a big deal of, and is forgotten a month later.

calichix
11-14-2009, 11:25 AM
yeah I remember when you were just leaving the states I think for school and got a few culture shocks. do you teach at an american school? I heard that's bank.

Irish-Rover
11-14-2009, 05:25 PM
Ah now. The Junior Cert is a waste of time really. Do the summer tests and the pres not prepare you enough for the Leaving Cert like?
The JC is way too hyped and made such a big deal of, and is forgotten a month later.

I have to disagree i think the J. Cert helps prepare you for the leaving cert

Llamas
11-15-2009, 02:44 AM
yeah I remember when you were just leaving the states I think for school and got a few culture shocks. do you teach at an american school? I heard that's bank.

Nah, they don't have those here. I teach at two language schools/agencies. Businesses hire the schools as clients, and the schools send teachers to their businesses to teach classes. I teach people from many companies, of various levels, and various jobs/needs. It pays quite well (I make double what a Czech teacher makes here... and I make more as a full time teacher than I would in the US), so I'm "wealthy" in this economy, but close to the average in the US.

And yes... my culture shocks :D I'm hitting some culture shock here, too, but I know how to deal with it this time, haha.

Kennytar
11-15-2009, 03:28 AM
We had the teacher strikes like years ago. Im not sure when, I was in highschool at that moment. I cant really remember it changing anything tho. Maybe they got little extra paid but nothing much. We are really short on teachers most of the times. Noone wants to become a teacher (I did) - its very stressful job and when you arent paid enough, whats the point huh?

Kennytar
11-15-2009, 03:33 AM
It pays quite well (I make double what a Czech teacher makes here... and I make more as a full time teacher than I would in the US), so I'm "wealthy" in this economy, but close to the average in the US.

And yes... my culture shocks :D I'm hitting some culture shock here, too, but I know how to deal with it this time, haha.


Foreign teachers always get better paid. Im not saying anything bad about them. But in 7th grade we had a english teacher from US and he didnt have any qualification and beside the fact that he was a great person, his teaching methods sucked! We didnt learn much, well we did practice speaking.

Llamas
11-15-2009, 04:27 AM
Foreign teachers always get better paid. Im not saying anything bad about them. But in 7th grade we had a english teacher from US and he didnt have any qualification and beside the fact that he was a great person, his teaching methods sucked! We didnt learn much, well we did practice speaking.

It's true. In some places - especially places like Estonia where English isn't exactly common - someone can just come from an English speaking country and find work. It's hard when you're in that position, though. You can't demand high qualifications, because then people aren't going to go to your country. Not saying anything bad about Estonia (I have a friend from the US who moved there and he loves it... I'd love to visit him someday), but Americans and Brits are more likely to move to more popular/westernized countries because it's easier to feel comfortable (not face so many cultural differences), and if your country demands the same qualifications, they're not gonna bother going there. The incentive to get English speakers to work there is that they don't have to get qualifications and such... it's a catch 22.

Here in the Czech Republic, English is a LITTLE more common... it's not like Germany and Scandinavia, but it's a little higher than more eastern countries. In order to get a job at a respectable language school, you have to have certification. I've completed the TESL certificate, which basically says I've taken 4 courses and had a certain number of hours of field teaching. This is getting to the point of being required by most schools here, so people don't end up with unqualified teachers. But only 10 years ago, it was the same here as it is in Estonia - if you're from a native speaking country, it was easy to teach here. Fortunately, most countries are heading toward more qualification.

Alison
11-15-2009, 04:40 AM
I have to disagree i think the J. Cert helps prepare you for the leaving cert

Maybe to a very small extent. But by the time I had done my Leaving Cert, anything I'd learned regarding timing etc was forgotten.
And besides, it's not very hard to adjust to the whole Leaving Cert exam...It's just another exam, like the year in year out summer and christmas exams. And the pres help a whole lot more than the Junior Cert ever could.
Also, a lot of people think that when they have done the Junioir Cert, that it's ok to drop out of school, that it's a good enough qualification. Nobody gives a shit about how you did in the junior cert. It's made such a huge deal of, and then if you drop out you realise a few months later "oh crap, I don't actually have a proper qualification".

I'm just ranting now...i don't really care about the junior cert and if they keep it or not.

Kennytar
11-15-2009, 05:33 AM
It's true. In some places - especially places like Estonia where English isn't exactly common - someone can just come from an English speaking country and find work. It's hard when you're in that position, though. You can't demand high qualifications, because then people aren't going to go to your country. Not saying anything bad about Estonia (I have a friend from the US who moved there and he loves it... I'd love to visit him someday), but Americans and Brits are more likely to move to more popular/westernized countries because it's easier to feel comfortable (not face so many cultural differences), and if your country demands the same qualifications, they're not gonna bother going there. The incentive to get English speakers to work there is that they don't have to get qualifications and such... it's a catch 22.

Here in the Czech Republic, English is a LITTLE more common... it's not like Germany and Scandinavia, but it's a little higher than more eastern countries. In order to get a job at a respectable language school, you have to have certification. I've completed the TESL certificate, which basically says I've taken 4 courses and had a certain number of hours of field teaching. This is getting to the point of being required by most schools here, so people don't end up with unqualified teachers. But only 10 years ago, it was the same here as it is in Estonia - if you're from a native speaking country, it was easy to teach here. Fortunately, most countries are heading toward more qualification.

Thats cool! In what area of Estonia your friend lives?

Well, english is our no 1 language to study/teach in schools. I guess its more schools fault that they hire everyone. Tho Im not sure its possible anymore to just get a teachers job cos english is your native language (I was in 7th grade,let me see....back in 1999). I must say it teaches a lot when you have to speak ONLY in english and most of the foreign teachers are more fun then estonian teachers ;)

For the defence of our language learning - most of our youth can speak a lot better english than other eastern Europe countrys. Im a patriot! LOL

Oh and for the defence of teachers, Ive had some great foreign teachers too, with a really high qualification. In highschool 10th grade, our english teacher was american. He was really good teacher and a great person. He was little depressed about Estonia, mostly because our school was in a really really little village, so nothing to do there. And he complained that we ate far too much potatoes :D

Irish-Rover
11-26-2009, 01:07 PM
so after tuesdays strike apparently the unions needs were not met so next thursday is off for us now aswell

Llamas
11-27-2009, 03:47 AM
I didn't realize I never replied to this...

Thats cool! In what area of Estonia your friend lives?
Ha, I have no idea. We're not close, so we haven't really talked much since he left the US.


Well, english is our no 1 language to study/teach in schools. I guess its more schools fault that they hire everyone. Tho Im not sure its possible anymore to just get a teachers job cos english is your native language (I was in 7th grade,let me see....back in 1999). I must say it teaches a lot when you have to speak ONLY in english and most of the foreign teachers are more fun then estonian teachers ;)
Chances are Estonia is similar in this way to most of Europe - you shouldn't base your opinion of native speakers teaching on your experience 10 years ago. Kinda unfair. Standards change constantly, so yeah. Schools here in CZ always ask for certification and many schools won't hire you without absolute certified official proof that you have completed the TESL certificate. Ten years ago, some native English speaker with no teaching qualifications could've found a job here, but that was 10 years ago.


For the defence of our language learning - most of our youth can speak a lot better english than other eastern Europe countrys. Im a patriot! LOL
haha and of course not biased at all ;) but that's cool that you feel that way! I've not been to all that many eastern european countries, so I can't comment... just that people in CZ seem to speak much better/more English than in Hungary, and Slovenia... and a bit more than in Poland and Slovakia.


Oh and for the defence of teachers, Ive had some great foreign teachers too, with a really high qualification. In highschool 10th grade, our english teacher was american. He was really good teacher and a great person. He was little depressed about Estonia, mostly because our school was in a really really little village, so nothing to do there. And he complained that we ate far too much potatoes :D
I love how many potatoes Czech people eat... omg. I love the food here! But there are always things to complain about when you move to a new country... there are plenty of things I don't like about CZ. Just not the food :)

coneourne
11-27-2009, 07:56 AM
100 Hated by teachers because I think for myself and am not a conformist like what they want students to be.

BTW, I agree with JCuki about these threads, no offence but they are getting old.
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Bobot
12-07-2009, 03:07 PM
Hi everyone! This is my first post here...


I can't speak specifically about Ireland, but I will say that, in most countries, teachers are majorly underpaid for the work they/we do. In most countries, we make considerably less than the average salary, for a very important job.

That's the mistake they all make. Educating the next generation of children is sowing the seeds for a healthy and productive society. People underestimate the importance of good education.

It's like a magic circle:
Teacher's pay is low -> Talented people avoid teaching -> Untalented people replace them -> Teachers are underestimated -> Low pay.

Teacher should be a highly estimated profession, like doctors and lawyers. If you raise the pay for teachers, the talented people will come. The you'll be able to set high demands and filter the unwanted. Then you'll have a good educational system that does not encourage antagonism, and improves the society.

Kennytar
12-09-2009, 04:01 AM
Chances are Estonia is similar in this way to most of Europe - you shouldn't base your opinion of native speakers teaching on your experience 10 years ago. Kinda unfair. Standards change constantly, so yeah. Schools here in CZ always ask for certification and many schools won't hire you without absolute certified official proof that you have completed the TESL certificate. Ten years ago, some native English speaker with no teaching qualifications could've found a job here, but that was 10 years ago.


Yeah, my fault! You never really understand how quickly time passes by when you aren't keeping track of years. When I started counting when I was in 7th grade I felt really old :D 10 years seems so long time - and when it's over, it feels only like a second.