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View Full Version : Do you think thought patterns are cultural?



calichix
12-24-2009, 06:02 PM
I've been thinking about ANTS (automatic negative thoughts, ahaw), and people say for instance that the english are self deprecating or that Italians are boastful, but I think internally it must vary from person to person, religion to religion, family to family. Do you think the way you think, whether it's in negatives or positives or extremes, and whether you dismiss compliments or your internal dialogue is entirely made up of affirmations, is dependent on how you were brought up or on your personal psychology?

DMelges
12-24-2009, 06:11 PM
I believe that our mentality is determined by our environment. The way you think is a result of all the people around you, everything around you. These details of your surroundings triggered your mind to think the way it does. Environmental adaptation would be a good way to put it. Two people can live in the same environment but have a totally different mentality. That's because we all adapt differently to everything. Some for better and some for worse.

wheelchairman
12-24-2009, 07:45 PM
In this instance there are no broad strokes, you can only paint with a wide brush, to use an English euphemism.

When I first moved to Denmark (and for about 4 years afterwards) pretty much figured that Americans and Western Europeans weren't entirely disimilar, boy was I wrong. Lately I've been discovering that in a society as inbred and small as the Danish that the differences between regions are incredibly different than I would expect (I recently moved from ěsterbro, a middle-to upper middle class neighborhood to Kastrup, a neighborhood right next to an airport, need I say more.)

You're understanding of the world I believe is made up what you pick up from others, subconsciously, overtly or whatever, I do not believe it is genetic. And while your individual experiences, thoughts, feelings and ambitions may influence this, there are huge differences.

Not to mention that in general language does seem to create the fundamental pathways which with we think. To use Danes as an example (and to be honest only those from Copenhagen), one of the more obvious traits is a tendency towards frankness that Americans would shy away from, could this be connected to the fact that in Danish there is no word for 'please'? Maybe, maybe not. But there is something there (probably.)

DMelges
12-24-2009, 07:57 PM
To use Danes as an example (and to be honest only those from Copenhagen), one of the more obvious traits is a tendency towards frankness that Americans would shy away from, could this be connected to the fact that in Danish there is no word for 'please'? Maybe, maybe not. But there is something there (probably.)

I can relate to this. I am currently living in Brazil, but I was born and spent most of my childhood in California. People here are very affectionate. When you are meeting a person of the other sex for the first time, normally you kiss on the cheek and might give a light hug. In USA, when you meet someone for the first time, you normally just shake hands. You would only kiss on the cheek and hug with a good acquaintance, a friend. Guys with guys, if friends here in Brazil, kiss and hug. Not sure how that works these days in the USA.
I haven't lived in the USA for a while now, so I don't know if I'm being 100% accurate here, but that's how I see it.

My point is that these little details, as how you greet people, also make a difference in personality. Brazilians learn to be very open in relationships, as the way the greet each other is very open. Americans are more reserved.