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AllIn All It's Not So Bad
01-11-2010, 12:59 PM
do you tend to avoid them or happily use them?

i tend to avoid them so i can make more of my creativity. and because alot of people wanna say i ripped so and so off

Llamas
01-11-2010, 01:07 PM
Actually, the less common a chord progression is, the more likely you are to be accused of ripping someone off.

Anyway, I've never really been one too pick or choose my chord progressions... I always go what is natural. Writing a song very organic for me, and I'd say whether or not my progressions are "common" or not is about 50/50. I think you can be pretty damn creative with a common progression, as long as your entire song isn't guitar chords, bass roots, and a melody.

T-6005
01-11-2010, 01:36 PM
The only progression I actively avoid is one like Am, F, C, G.

Though to be fair I actively use that exact progression, only instead of G I use E7.

A lot of the time I'll just be idly playing and something will come into my head and I'll just go from there. Quite often it's not at all chord related, like a beat or a lyrical idea, and then I build around that using whatever feels right.

Llamas
01-11-2010, 01:45 PM
The only progression I actively avoid is one like Am, F, C, G.

What's funny is that, I'm pretty sure allinall made this thread because of a thread dexternumbers made in GOD, about Pennywise ripping off the Offspring... and the very common progression of the songs in question was a i VI iii VII one, a F c G is a perfect example. :-P


Though to be fair I actively use that exact progression, only instead of G I use E7.
I actually think that makes it slightly more common... using the v instead of the vii. But it doesn't matter, because I think any progression can be used well without being redundant, if you're a good song writer. Yes, that's a compliment on your song-writing skills. :)

T-6005
01-11-2010, 01:49 PM
I actually think that makes it slightly more common... using the v instead of the vii. But it doesn't matter, because I think any progression can be used well without being redundant, if you're a good song writer. Yes, that's a compliment on your song-writing skills. :)

Hah, well, thank you. I'm working on some things right now, as it turns out. Maybe in the next month or two they'll come out. Who knows?

Yeah, it's still common, but I think especially in the realm of rock music it's not quite as common as the vii.

Llamas
01-11-2010, 01:53 PM
Hah, well, thank you. I'm working on some things right now, as it turns out. Maybe in the next month or two they'll come out. Who knows?
ohh cool, I still have all the music you uploaded for me a while ago. I still think egyptian robot battle is my favorite, though :P


Yeah, it's still common, but I think especially in the realm of rock music it's not quite as common as the vii.
True, very valid point.

randman21
01-11-2010, 02:17 PM
I actually think that makes it slightly more common... using the v instead of the vii.
Is it? Not that I'm disagreeing, it's just...being an Offspring fan, that's their go-to progression. :D I can't really think of a song with that i vi iii vii, but then again I don't really pay attention to chord progressions unless I'm trying to learn the song.

EDIT: Never mind, though. I see that T said the same thing.


do you tend to avoid them or happily use them?

i tend to avoid them so i can make more of my creativity. and because alot of people wanna say i ripped so and so off
Dude, you really need to watch out for that. There's what llamas said in response to this post. Then there's focusing so much on coming up with something that's never been done before, that you neglect writing a good song. Some of the best (popular) songs in history are very simple. There's a reason people latch on to those kinds of things.

dff_punk
01-11-2010, 05:22 PM
I'm not ashamed of the fact that while writing songs, I heavily use the common chord progressions. The trick is that I tend to mix things up, you can have for example five common chord progressions in one song, but you play each one in a different way, at a different place, with a different style. It works for me most of the time and I'm content with the song, as long as it's catchy while still staying a bit original. But I still don't rely on those progression, most of the time the melody pops up first, the basic ideas that are in my head.

And.. you almost always get a hit chorus when you put the most classic progression which has been mentioned before (Ami, F, C, G.. or its variations by starting with another chord, for ex. C, G, Ami, F or F, C, G, Ami) in it. There are tons of melodies which have not been used yet, all you need is the talent and the will to "embrace that progression" :) It can be done. But if some melody sounds too familar to you, better dig in your mind if it isn't a song you already heard somewhere.

ThunderPX
01-11-2010, 06:11 PM
I consider it a challenge to write many different songs with essentially the same progression, without anybody noticing. I mean, The Offspring have used the "All I Want" progression tons of times, but the songs still kick ass.

Besides, often trying to avoid "normal" chord progressions just makes things sound odd and forced.

DMelges
01-11-2010, 06:23 PM
I don't tend to avoid common chord progressions, because it's all about how you use them. The Offspring's chord progression in Self Esteem has a unique rythm to it (and no, it's not a rip off of Nirvana).

T-6005
01-11-2010, 07:04 PM
I don't tend to avoid common chord progressions, because it's all about how you use them. The Offspring's chord progression in Self Esteem has a unique rythm to it (and no, it's not a rip off of Nirvana).

It's funny how you're absolutely right - it's not a rip off of Nirvana.

They're different CHORD PROGRESSIONS!

Llamas
01-11-2010, 07:12 PM
Which Nirvana song are we referring to here?

DMelges
01-11-2010, 08:58 PM
It's funny how you're absolutely right - it's not a rip off of Nirvana.

They're different CHORD PROGRESSIONS!

I meant the rythm.