PDA

View Full Version : Let's have a fantasy dinner party!



Mota Boy
10-26-2004, 11:57 PM
My local paper has this every week when it interviews someone from around town. About 80% of the time the list will include both Jesus and George W. Bush. Sometimes they'll invite Moses and Abraham also (I'm guessing most of them haven't realized that Moses and Abraham were Jews). I'm interested to see what a broader segment of the population thinks.

Here are the rules: You can only choose four people. They can be living or dead, and while fictional characters are allowed, the practice is highly discouraged (and we're assuming that questionable historical figures - i.e. Socrates and God - exist).


My choices:

Jesus
Chris Rock
Ben Franklin
Scarlett Johansson/Julia Stiles


OK, you can't go wrong with ol' JC. You'll immediately solve two of the most mind-bending questions of the ages: "Was Jesus really the Son of God?" and "Does he know any good jokes?". Regardless of his divinity, Jesus was one of the most amazing philosophers of all time. Hopefully he had a sense of humor. Oh, and as a bonus, instead of running up a huge bar tab you'd just have to order water and BAM, endless wine.

Chris Rock - a hilarious comedian who is also intelligent and insightful. I imagine it'd just be a ton of fun to shoot the shit with him.

Ben Franklin - Awesome motherfucker. Not only brilliant, but also comes across as a fun-lovin' kinda guy. Both one of the founders of our country (among being a diplomat, inventor, publisher and philosopher), he also is attributed to the quote "Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy".

And as for the women... you have to have some ladyfolk, and these women are not only beautiful, but also come across as brilliant and most interesting. If anyone can point out any wiser, foxier ladies then I'll rotate out Miss Johansson/Stiles.

So, this is my quick list (I just put a couple minute's thought into it). What's yours?

And anyone who lists all four members of the Offspring is one uncreative, dull motherfucker.

Endymion
10-27-2004, 12:08 AM
Scarlett sure is a fox. as for franklin... i always loved what he told his son: "don't let schooling get in the way of your education."

anyway, my four would be...: Stephen Wolfram, Paul Reubens, Oliver Heaviside, and... hm, toss up between Andy Kaufman and John Keats.

punk_flamingo
10-27-2004, 01:05 AM
Edgar Allan Poe
Jimi Hendrix
Station (as in the station fella from bill and ted's bogus journey - yes so he's fictional whatever)
Seth Green

Edgar Allan Poe - i love his work and it'd be awesome to talk to him about it and see what's really in his mind

Hendrix - he's my god...and he'd have weed

Station - come on the only words he says are "station" and he says it randomly...funny as

Seth Green - I need some eye candy..and he seems like a pretty nice guy

wheelchairman
10-27-2004, 07:29 AM
hmmm

Karl Marx
Jesus
Kim Il Sung
Josef Stalin

Karl Marx- Perhaps he'd be kind enough to explain the more complicated aspects of his theory.

Jesus- Same reasons as Mota Boy.

Kim Il Sung- For a deeper explanation of the Juche idea.

Josef Stalin- I'd like his account of things.

Wizard*SweetRockerGirl*
10-27-2004, 08:06 AM
god
raistlin
rhett
spike
dracula that would be fun lol

[popple]
10-27-2004, 08:11 AM
Brandon Boyd
DJ Krush
Joss Stone
Prince

Brandon Boyd - He's so artisticly talented, I'd love to get to know him

DJ Krush - I love his beats

Joss Stone - Really fit and I wanna' write a song with her

Prince - Really funky and I'd like to know how he writes his songs

MindlessSelfIndulgent
10-27-2004, 08:37 AM
I dont like dinner partys.

sKratch
10-27-2004, 08:57 AM
hmmm

Karl Marx
Jesus
Kim Il Sung
Josef Stalin

Karl Marx- Perhaps he'd be kind enough to explain the more complicated aspects of his theory.

Jesus- Same reasons as Mota Boy.

Kim Il Sung- For a deeper explanation of the Juche idea.

Josef Stalin- I'd like his account of things.
I'm interested in your take on Stalin's tendency to have people killed.

wheelchairman
10-27-2004, 09:31 AM
Hmm I don't really have an opinion. I don't believe most of what I read by Robert Conquest for example (he was a right-wing historian who I believe claimed that Stalin had 80 million people killed or something.) From what I've read, I believe the number was about 5 million. Many of whom were probably guilty of the crimes they committed. Although I am positive that there were those who didn't deserve what happened to them. And that is a tragedy.

The real problem is, that Stalin thought he could get rid of a political group by killing or imprisoning them, that's not very dialectic at all. What needed to happen was more debate for example. And the forcing of the farmers into the collective farms was very much distinctly against what communists had been writing about for years.

Anyways, it's hard to get a precise number of how many died in GULAG because a lot of things concerning Stalin's era was burned under Khruschev's break with Stalin. But I would say about 5 million is a good estimate.

sKratch
10-27-2004, 09:39 AM
Do you agree with mass murder as a means of establishing power, though? Even if those killed were "guilty" of what they did, as you say (or I think it's what you're saying) their crimes didn't merit the penalty of death. From what I gather you believe the masses should have been legitimately convinced of the benefits of communism through debate and indoctrination rather than terror? Sorry I don't mean to be playing 20 questions but I just remember you as being more extreme, but perhaps my memory fails me.

wheelchairman
10-27-2004, 09:46 AM
Hmm no, if I were to gain power, there would be no excuse for a death penalty after the revolution.

Of course the masses should support the revolution. Otherwise revolution would be impossible.

Debate is important, as well as criticism and such. As a communist you must fight against dogmatism as much as against the right-wing, etc. etc.

RXP
10-27-2004, 10:30 AM
Dexter
Noodles
GregK
Atom

lol

Vera
10-27-2004, 10:45 AM
Stalin's account on things? You mean, like, his justification for his actions?

Stalin: I didn't get hugged as a child!!!
WCM: Aww, Josif, c'mere...
Stalin: *sends WCM to Siberia*
Stalin: *evil laughter*

Are fictional characters allowed? Because I'd just have a bunch of my favourites of those.

Mota Boy
10-27-2004, 10:52 AM
Here are the rules: You can only choose four people. They can be living or dead, and while fictional characters are allowed, the practice is highly discouraged (and we're assuming that questionable historical figures - i.e. Socrates and God - exist).

Normally I'd be annoyed at someone for this, but I know that it's because you're Finnish, so you're doing the best that you can with what you were given.

[popple]
10-27-2004, 10:55 AM
Normally I'd be annoyed at someone for this, but I know that it's because you're Finnish, so you're doing the best that you can with what you were given.

Hehe. Way to go.

wheelchairman
10-27-2004, 11:10 AM
Stalin's account on things? You mean, like, his justification for his actions?

Stalin: I didn't get hugged as a child!!!
WCM: Aww, Josif, c'mere...
Stalin: *sends WCM to Siberia*
Stalin: *evil laughter*

Are fictional characters allowed? Because I'd just have a bunch of my favourites of those.

He did give your country independence you know.

RXP
10-27-2004, 11:42 AM
If it were fictional

Angel - the man's been thru a lot and seen alot.
Jack Bauer - A man this good in the clutch one has to shake the hand of
Xena - the stories, the wisdom, the courage.
Benton Frasier (Mountie from Due South) - because he's funny and doesn't realise it.

But if it were real:

Hitler - having studied him for I think 5 years in total I'd like to meet him and discuss everything and anything.

Hume - he reaches into so many areas of philosophy, most I've seen. I don't konw a lot about him so who better to learn off?

Steve Yzerman - gotta talk hockey.

Random cute/hot girl who's also funny, smart and most importantly into me.

Indeed this list would suck. It's just a list of people I wanna talk too. But I honestly can't think of one person from history I'd really love to talk to. Unless it was to solve a mystery like Kurt Cobain - did he shoot himself etc.

Andy
10-27-2004, 01:06 PM
Keith Moon
Jesus Christ
Joey Ramone
Billy Connolly
John Lennon
Eric Idle
Michael Palin
Terry Jones
Graham Chapman
John Cleese

(i'll get a big table!)

Kayleigh
10-27-2004, 01:51 PM
J. S. Mill
Jesus
Holden Caulfield
Prince


J. S. Mill - I'd like to bring him back so that I could ask him a few questions about different things. Like the NHS. And I think he would probably be a nice man, too.

Jesus - You have to have Jesus, for the obvious reasons.

Holden Caulfield - I know he's fictional, but when I first read 'The Catcher In The Rye' I fell in love with him a little bit, and I'd want him at my dinner party.

Prince - I was thinking about the fourth person to invite, and I saw someone else put Prince, and at the moment I'm a little bit obsessed with 'Purple Rain', so I'd like to invite him along. He could be the after dinner entertainment!

Nina
10-27-2004, 02:36 PM
Jesus (it's getting old, i know. i dont care though)
Q from Star Trek! (he'd have to explain to me a lot
of things...)
Kant to hear how his German sounds when he speaks :]
Caesar to hear how Latin sounds and to see how he
really looked like.

sKratch
10-27-2004, 02:48 PM
Hmm no, if I were to gain power, there would be no excuse for a death penalty after the revolution.
How about during? And what's the justification of killing people who don't support the cause?

wheelchairman
10-27-2004, 02:55 PM
Of course the people who fight against the revolution should die. Letting them live would be stupid. It would be like if we fought WW2 with sticks against the nazis.

So yes, during the revolution the death penalty would be necessary. Similar to every revolution.

This is of course if we're talking about a violent revolution. That is only a last resort.

Vera
10-28-2004, 07:05 AM
He did give your country independence you know.
Thanks for the history lesson. I think I know why my country was able to become independent, but I would just love to hear your ideas, as well.

wheelchairman
10-28-2004, 07:12 AM
Finnish Independence from the Soviet Union was recognized by the People's Commissar of Nationalities, Josef V. Stalin in 1917.

The borders were official after the treaty of Tartu in 1920.

Vera
10-28-2004, 07:17 AM
Normally I'd be annoyed at someone for this, but I know that it's because you're Finnish, so you're doing the best that you can with what you were given.
I remembered the whole deal from what you told me on AIM once, so I pretty much skimmed the post.

So why don't you just shoot me omg.

*iniates fist fight with Mota Boy*

Vera
10-28-2004, 07:25 AM
Finnish Independence from the Soviet Union was recognized by the People's Commissar of Nationalities, Josef V. Stalin in 1917.
Hmm. I believe that was Lenin, sorry. And while it's true that many countries probably wouldn't have recognized Finland as an independent country unless SU had confirmed that, I do know for a fact that for example France recognized our independence before they knew it had been recognized by Soviet Union.

wheelchairman
10-28-2004, 08:02 AM
What if situations are irrelevant. I could say that potentially they could've had the Red Army over to Finland and crush any rebellion. They didn't.

And nope it was Stalin. It was his duty as the People's Commissar of Nationalities. He told it to the Communist Party of Finland. (although I believe they had a different name at the time). And they were ordered to take the necessary steps to let the country know that Finland had it's independence accepted from the SU.

And that's all well and good that France accepted Finnish independence, but seeing as Finland wasn't a part of France that doesn't play a big role in much.

Vera
10-28-2004, 08:31 AM
Which "what if"-scenarios are you talking about, because I don't think I'm talking about any.

He was one of the eight people that signed the agreement. I wouldn't exactly call that "giving Finland independency". And at that time, I definitely count Lenin to have more power than Stalin.

And thanks for taking the people's tiredless efforts for gaining independency into consideration. Really. It's not like the people at the time worked hard for it or anything. Nope. All thanks to Stalin.

omg <33333333333 josif!11

RXP
10-28-2004, 09:20 AM
I thought Finland was a state of Sweden.

Vera
10-28-2004, 09:27 AM
Those fags fucking wish we were their state.

wheelchairman
10-28-2004, 09:51 AM
Wow getting a little jingoistic over semantics aren't we?

Lenin was above Stalin. But Stalin was the People's Commissar of Nationalities. The Finnish question would've been under his responsibilities.

And it's all well and good that the Finnish people fought for their independence, but Stalin's thesis ( http://www.marx2mao.com/Stalin/FL24.html#c6 ) on Nationalities that made the administrative decision.

Sure, in a 'what if' scenario, if Stalin's commissariat had said no, the Finnish people would've likely had an uprising, probably succesful, but who's to say?

Vera
10-28-2004, 10:03 AM
Don't know. See, a majority of Finns didn't probably even know what was going on. We were a very rural nation back then. Only the Swedish-speaking university elite worked hard toward the independence. Everyone else was just trying to make it alive. At least that's my idea of Finland at the time. The uprising would require an army of sorts, wouldn't it?

Anyway, I apologize for not wanting to say that a nutcase dictator made my country independent. Really, I should know better by now.

And yes, you did hit a particular nerve.

wheelchairman
10-28-2004, 10:08 AM
It's not a question of what you want history to be, it's about what it was, so yes you should've known better.

Honestly can't say I know much about Finland from back then other then a chapter or two in a few books on European and Scandinavian History.

Why is Finland a part of Scandinavia though? (other than geography there is no real linkage between Denmark, Norway and Sweden who basically share a language to some extent)

RXP
10-28-2004, 10:13 AM
It's not a question of what you want history to be, it's about what it was

The myth that history 'was' is exactly that, a myth. History is what you argue it to be not all the answers are clear cut. Simplistic history such as "RXP was born in 1984" may be a matter of fact, but more complex matters such as to what extent was Stalin responsible for Finnish independence is far more complex.

not that I know anything about Stalin, Finland or what lead to independance I'm sure there are a huge number of casual factors lead to the effect of independance just as in most other countries.

wheelchairman
10-28-2004, 10:16 AM
That's all quite true. Until we get to the point where we have to dig for sources. Then it becomes a slightly different story.

Vera- if it helps, that was 20 years before the worst of his purges. People tend to change a lot over that period of time.

Vera
10-28-2004, 10:25 AM
Tch. Independence doesn't happen because of a few signatures. Stalin's just plays one part. One of the final parts, yes, but the most fundamental ones? Definitely not.

RXP
10-28-2004, 10:49 AM
That conclusion made me cum.

Vera
10-28-2004, 11:20 AM
Okay. I'm ...not going to ask you whether you touched yourself in order to achieve that. Because you know, each to their own and if you get off on Stalin, that's fine with me.