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Al Coholic
02-09-2012, 05:11 PM
Is lol here to stay?

Each generation, decade, whatever, has its own words and phrases that come with it, and many die with it. In some cases, they are only preserved as something we use to stereotype and mock the genreation. If I told you a character in a movie said something was "totally radical dude!" You would immediately think this was a 1980's adolescent stock character who more than likely skateboards.


If you also thought he's a teenage mutant ninja turtle, good for you.


With the 1990s came widespread use of the internet and soon to follow cell phones. Chat room lingo like 'lol' was soon carried over to cell phones, with their at-the-time limited capacity for texting. Ofcourse now (and now is only about a decade since lol's widespread use) new innovations in texting have caused people to be able to write more, and faster. Things like T9, swype to text, talk to text, and just plain full keyboards have made abbreviations less common, n typin lik dis isnt wat u c ppl doin as much. It would be silly to think that since all these innovations have come in just the last few years, another few wouldn't see an exponential increase.

However, some people type out full sentences, with perfect grammar and punctuation, and still choose to throw in the occasional lol. Which is indicative that it's found its own place in our language, and has survived past a need for fast typing convinience. Lol has evolved way outside of other chat room abbreviations like brb. But unlike the brb's and ttyl's of modern communication, those are abbreviations of phrases people said long before the internet. Lol is new, and a product of new communication - instant, faceless, and voiceless(okay, there was the telegraph, but you know what I mean). So on the one hand it is part of a new generations new made up words, but on the other it has outlived its intended purpose and adapted itself over time.



So the question is, will lol become an obsolete word of a past generation, or is it here to stay for the long haul? Will our grandkids watch parodies and movies about our generation and think all of us said lol all the time? Or will they be using lol in their own evolved forms of communication?













?

KickHimWhenHe'sDown
02-09-2012, 06:49 PM
I have to restrain myself from using it. I like typing in full sentences and using decent (at least understandable) grammar, but I still frequently use "lol" to express my laughter in text format. Either that, or I repeatedly type "ha", sometimes in all capital letters. "HAHAHAHA" has quite a bit of emotion.

I try to keep a balance between the two. I try to rotate between typing "lol" and "haha/hahaha" so I don't end up using the same one over and over again.

I think I'll keep using it for a while. Whether or not my children will, I don't know.

Isolated Fury
02-10-2012, 06:23 AM
I have never used it with the exception of purposely making myself sound like a complete idiot in a sarcastic attempt to insult/joke with someone. I will never use it with the exception of purposely making myself sound like a complete idiot in a sarcastic attempt to insult/joke with someone. I honestly hope the word dies and burns in an eternal hell-flame.

Llamas
02-10-2012, 11:24 AM
It's here to stay. I'd like to start by focusing on this bit:


However, some people type out full sentences, with perfect grammar and punctuation, and still choose to throw in the occasional lol. Which is indicative that it's found its own place in our language, and has survived past a need for fast typing convinience. Lol has evolved way outside of other chat room abbreviations like brb. But unlike the brb's and ttyl's of modern communication, those are abbreviations of phrases people said long before the internet. Lol is new, and a product of new communication - instant, faceless, and voiceless(okay, there was the telegraph, but you know what I mean). So on the one hand it is part of a new generations new made up words, but on the other it has outlived its intended purpose and adapted itself over time.

I am definitely one of those people you described, and it's a good point. The only other internet abbreviation I use is "wtf". I may use "brb" every once in a while, but very rarely. I never use "ttyl" or "lmao" or "gtg" or any of that. It's definitely evolved past that.

Let's also take notice of the fact that it's the (only?) one people actually say out loud (by people, I hopefully mean teenagers... I never hear adults saying it out loud). It's become a legitimate part of some people's vocabulary.

Now let me point out how widespread it is - not only offline, and not only by people like me who type grammatically sentences. It is also very much not exclusive to English-speaking countries. Many European teenagers, regardless of which language they're speaking, will use "lol" in both type and speech. It's funny in Slavic languages because they pronounce it with a long 'o', kind of like "Lowel".

Let's compare this to something like "totally radical, dude!" While it was far superior to "lol", it was more of a catchphrase. It wasn't nearly as widespread or as easy to find a reason to use it. "lol" works easily as a filler, in any place or time. I definitely think it's here to stay, and teenagers will still be using it years down the road. I think it's like "gonna" and "wanna".