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View Full Version : This generation has an entitlement problem?



bighead384
03-09-2012, 08:31 AM
I've heard this assessment a lot. Not sure what to think of it.

It really does seem like I meet a lot of people that think they should be treated as special and have a sense of entitlement. But perhaps people only think this because they're frustrated, and they want to develop a generalizing theory that explains everything. And, if this theory were true, what would explain it? I'm sure a lot of conservatives would point to increases in certain social spending programs.

"You think you deserve something just because you want it" - Swimming With Sharks

Isolated Fury
03-09-2012, 09:28 AM
I've heard this assessment a lot. Not sure what to think of it.
Yes.


I'm sure a lot of conservatives would point to increases in certain social spending programs.
No.

We've all been told through our academic careers that in order to be successful, we have to pursue a higher education (this is going back to your college thread). We all know that it doesn't always work that way. Some people graduate, and that's it. I have a friend in Florida that worked his ass off to graduate in three years and is now working as a sales associate in a Hurley store. He had the ambition and the knowledge to be better than that. But that's what he ended up with. Wouldn't you feel like you deserve more than that if you were him? I would. I did what everyone told me. I worked like a dog in my classes, and this is my result?

Of course we have entitlement issues. We've been lied to since day one. It's something we have to deal with. We have to learn to get past all of the guarantees we were told. Just because you went to college and did well does not mean you are "saved" a spot in your desired job field. Nobody cares about some kid, fresh out of college. Management likes that they can force people into retirement and hire a kid at lower pay, but all of the veteran staff hates them. That kid got Harold fired. Fuck him. Now they make his work life a living hell, and he goes home thinking "maybe I picked the wrong major." You didn't pick the wrong major. Life is just tough, and nobody let you in on that little secret. Now you either stay at the job and EXPECT (for some retarded reason) a promotion a lot sooner than is even logically rational, or you quit and pick up a part-time job while you look for a better position that "appreciates your abilities more." You aren't going to get that promotion for a while. That's why your coworkers that are the same position as you are in their 40s. Why aren't they promoted yet? Weird. And nobody is going to appreciate what you do any more than the next person. You are there to do their work. That's it. Get your work done. End of story. Their "appreciation" for you comes in an envelop every two weeks and pays your rent.

Like I said... Yeah, we do have entitlement issues. Blame your parents/teachers/guidance counselors for that.

Llamas
03-09-2012, 09:36 AM
I've heard this assessment a lot. Not sure what to think of it.

It really does seem like I meet a lot of people that think they should be treated as special and have a sense of entitlement. But perhaps people only think this because they're frustrated, and they want to develop a generalizing theory that explains everything. And, if this theory were true, what would explain it? I'm sure a lot of conservatives would point to increases in certain social spending programs.

"You think you deserve something just because you want it" - Swimming With Sharks

I think as long as you show appreciation for your accomplishments like this guy does, (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2WP0Njco6g) you're all set and totally deserve it. WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? I AM!

JohnnyNemesis
03-09-2012, 11:57 AM
Is no one else smirking over the fact that bighead made a thread with this title?

Sorry, I don't mean to pick a fight or anything, I just found it funny...please forgive...

Isolated Fury
03-09-2012, 12:13 PM
Is no one else smirking over the fact that bighead made a thread with this title?

Sorry, I don't mean to pick a fight or anything, I just found it funny...please forgive...
Now that you point it out, it's the punniest thing I've read all day.

bighead384
03-09-2012, 01:45 PM
Is no one else smirking over the fact that bighead made a thread with this title?

Sorry, I don't mean to pick a fight or anything, I just found it funny...please forgive...

What, like you know I have an entitlement problem? How would you know?

Isolated Fury
03-09-2012, 01:52 PM
What, like you know I have an entitlement problem? How would you know?
Calm down, Cletus. Step back, and look at it. Look at your name.

Jojan
03-09-2012, 02:05 PM
More Jante (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jante_Law)!

bighead384
03-09-2012, 02:06 PM
Calm down, Cletus. Step back, and look at it. Look at your name.

Bighead = entitlement? Uh, okay.

We haven't butted heads nearly enough for you to be as nasty towards me as you are. That's why I say "Isolated Fury tries too hard".

XYlophonetreeZ
03-09-2012, 03:16 PM
Bighead = entitlement? Uh, okay.

We haven't butted heads nearly enough for you to be as nasty towards me as you are. That's why I say "Isolated Fury tries too hard".
I kind of agree with this. I still <3 u, IF, but the culture of this board has changed a little bit. We're not just out-front dicks to everyone that we don't like anymore. I know it was kind of fun, but I guess we've grown up? Most of us, at least.

And bighead, the reality is, back in 2006 or whenever IF used to post, everyone really would have thought that the type of things he's saying to you were cool, and he'd probably succeed in ushering in an army of people to make fun of you in this thread. So I think it's just an adjustment he'll make as he settles back in here. He's a cool dude and I hope there's no unfounded antagonism between you two anymore.

I'm pretty sure I sound like some Buddhist pacifist douche.


I don't really get why bighead making this topic is funny/ironic, but I'm sure I'm missing something.

Isolated Fury
03-09-2012, 04:18 PM
Bighead = entitlement? Uh, okay.

We haven't butted heads nearly enough for you to be as nasty towards me as you are. That's why I say "Isolated Fury tries too hard".
To be honest, I'm not trying to be nasty. I was actually trying to stop you, as fast as possible, from exploding into anger over a joke. The thread is about entitlement. Your name is bighead384. To have a large ego or to feel entitled to something is referred to as having a "big head." It really is a joke - a joke not aimed specifically at you. It's just a play on words.

And Treez, I'm not intentionally trying to start anything. Especially with bighead. I feel like if a flame-a-thon were to start between us, it wouldn't stop. You are right, though. Back then, posting kind of dickishly was considered the awesome thing to do. But now that I look back on it all, I didn't really post that way that often. I was more of a meek and mild (typed milked at first) type that just enjoyed the fact that I didn't really piss anyone off. Haha. The "you" I was using in the first post of this thread was a generalized "you." I wasn't targeting biggie. The post (and maybe some others) might come off as hotheaded and offensive, but that's because it's something that I actually feel very strongly about. There IS a huge sense of entitlement in our generation, and it really bothers me. Come to think of it, I didn't even mention how I think video games are instilling this mindset. Shit. It may seem like I'm trying to attack biggie sometimes, but I think it's because we have such differing views and personalities.

Bighead, I don't hate you. I just don't agree with you sometimes.

bighead384
03-10-2012, 04:19 PM
Yes.


No.

We've all been told through our academic careers that in order to be successful, we have to pursue a higher education (this is going back to your college thread). We all know that it doesn't always work that way. Some people graduate, and that's it. I have a friend in Florida that worked his ass off to graduate in three years and is now working as a sales associate in a Hurley store. He had the ambition and the knowledge to be better than that. But that's what he ended up with. Wouldn't you feel like you deserve more than that if you were him? I would. I did what everyone told me. I worked like a dog in my classes, and this is my result?

Of course we have entitlement issues. We've been lied to since day one. It's something we have to deal with. We have to learn to get past all of the guarantees we were told. Just because you went to college and did well does not mean you are "saved" a spot in your desired job field. Nobody cares about some kid, fresh out of college. Management likes that they can force people into retirement and hire a kid at lower pay, but all of the veteran staff hates them. That kid got Harold fired. Fuck him. Now they make his work life a living hell, and he goes home thinking "maybe I picked the wrong major." You didn't pick the wrong major. Life is just tough, and nobody let you in on that little secret. Now you either stay at the job and EXPECT (for some retarded reason) a promotion a lot sooner than is even logically rational, or you quit and pick up a part-time job while you look for a better position that "appreciates your abilities more." You aren't going to get that promotion for a while. That's why your coworkers that are the same position as you are in their 40s. Why aren't they promoted yet? Weird. And nobody is going to appreciate what you do any more than the next person. You are there to do their work. That's it. Get your work done. End of story. Their "appreciation" for you comes in an envelop every two weeks and pays your rent.

Like I said... Yeah, we do have entitlement issues. Blame your parents/teachers/guidance counselors for that.

I don't know if you can place basically all the blame into just one institution, although you make good points. People feel like once they've jumped through enough academic hoops, they should be able to just cruise for the rest of their life. Doesn't usually work out like that.

One thing that definitely seems true is that young adults live off their parents longer than say 30-40 years ago. I'm not sure what caused this change to be honest.

Isolated Fury
03-10-2012, 10:16 PM
I don't know if you can place basically all the blame into just one institution, although you make good points. People feel like once they've jumped through enough academic hoops, they should be able to just cruise for the rest of their life. Doesn't usually work out like that.
I'll get to this later. I need sleep.


One thing that definitely seems true is that young adults live off their parents longer than say 30-40 years ago. I'm not sure what caused this change to be honest.
As for this part, I already knew what I wanted to say. However, John Cheese said it best in an article I read a couple months ago.


In my parents' day, it was always just sort of assumed that at age 18, you pack your shit and get the hell out of the house. Go back 40 years and you find everybody getting drafted into the military at that age (Vietnam and before that, Korea, and before that, World War II). When you got back, you started having babies. So if you were still living at home at age 25, they made you stay in the attic and told the neighbors you had died from tuberculosis.

Things started to change with the "everybody goes to college" era. Going to college means you're probably not supporting yourself, you're living in temporary student housing and your parents keep your old bedroom in place for when you come back for the summer. So then if you don't get a job out of college, you're right back home at age 23, possibly still sleeping on a bed shaped like the Millennium Falcon.

So now you guys are living in a world where kids don't move away from Mom and Dad until their mid 20s to lower 30s. And it's the same story with marriage -- today you tend to marry in your late 20s, as opposed to my parents' generation, who did so five years earlier.

But this has created a very annoying, ugly side effect in the culture: the phenomenon of the immature Man-Child. The twenty-something dude with his collection of anime action figures, the guy pushing 30 who's still sticking it out with his garage band and spends his nights getting in screaming matches with teenagers on XBox Live, the hipster who spends 80 percent of his income on wacky ironic clothes and mustache growth supplements.

In other words, we've extended the awkward teenage years into the mid to late 20s. Now, I would not be apologizing for this if it was just the result of social and economic factors outside our control. But the problem is that we made a hero of that person. Think Kelso in That '70s Show, or Joey from Friends. My generation aspired to be that guy, the kid in a grownup body with simple, childish appetites and aspirations. I was that guy for years -- a dude can get very popular doing that.

But let me tell you from experience, the longer you put off adulthood, the harder the transition is.

And staying home longer does delay it -- a huge part of becoming an adult is living on your own and finding out through trial and error what works, living through seemingly simple things like balancing your budget, cooking your own meals and learning how to get blood stains out of your ceiling without repainting.

And what's going to happen is you're going to run into a whole lot of people who still judge you according to the age scale set by my parents' generation -- that you should have your shit together by 23.

So you grow up in a culture that tells you maturity is for boring assholes, and then suddenly you get dumped into a world that expects maturity.
Plus he's funny, so that's a little bonus.

Little_Miss_1565
03-10-2012, 10:30 PM
There's John Cleese, but it's also less that people expect to "cruise" the rest of their lives after college, but rather that people are told "go to college or you'll end up flipping burgers and delivering pizzas all your life." Now people who have gone to college and did what they were "supposed" to do are struggling. I don't think anyone expects it to be easy, but I don't think they're prepared for how hard it can be.

Llamas
03-11-2012, 05:28 AM
I really like how Cleese put it. Very well said. He also seems to note (though he doesn't actually state it) that it's especially worse with men - more men stay at home longer, and have a harder time transitioning into adulthood. This discussion reminds me of two things:

1) A friend of mine has been working on a Master's degree in sociology, wherein she's focusing her research on gender issues in academia. Her research extends to childhood, when little girls are quiet and intimidated due to remnants of the notion that girls aren't supposed to be smart and confident; they're just supposed to be quiet and passive... and boys are supposed to be loud and semi-obnoxious. In the past, this led to girls doing worse in school than boys, and that was why more men went on to succeed than women. But now that all-girls schools and classes and other related things exist, girls are starting to surpass boys. In the past, these girls would graduate high school and want a man to take care of her, so they'd move out of their parents' houses and get married. Now, women graduate, go to college, and then get a job and spend some time being "career women". Since they don't need to be taken care of financially anymore, less women are choosing to get married. For some reason, women tend to move out of home regardless and get a place with friends, while men tend to stay at home - possibly until marriage/serious relationship comes.

Her research also hints that women are starting to outnumber men in the workforce, as more and more women are getting qualified, but the number of men has gone relatively unchanged. Apparently, unemployment is much higher for men than for women.

2) In most of Europe (except Northern - the Nordics and the UK/Ireland are not included in this. Probably also not included are Belgium and the Netherlands), it's always been like this. Women typically stay at home until they finish university (the distance is much smaller here, so it's easy and logical to stay at home while attending school - especially since college students are broke), but men stay at home til they get married. I have seen way too many times how sort of pathetic and overly dependent men become when they live at home for too long. Most people here agree that after school - whenever you finish school - is the right time for kids to move out. But I have friends (and ex-boyfriends of friends) who stayed at home until at least 30, and thus became overly attached to their parents (especially mom, who takes care of everything for them) and it becomes a million times harder for them to grow up when the time comes.

killer_queen
03-11-2012, 10:16 AM
The sad thing is boys don't start growing up even though they leave their moms. Girls are so willing to be their boyfriends' mothers and don't even realize how sick it is. Almost any girl friend I know is cleaning her boyfriend's home once a week, washing the dishes and dirty underwear and even decide what he wears. And pointing out the weirdness of the situation is useless because you'll probably get blamed for being jealous of the wonderful relationship they have. And a couple of years later when they get married and the life between work and being a slave at home they start to whine about how men don't act like grownups. I can't blame men for having a childish spirit and resisting to grow up, that kind of life is offered on a silver tray; it would be stupid to refuse.

Isolated Fury
03-11-2012, 10:33 AM
Cheese. Not Cleese. Haha. John Cheese is a comedy writer, and John Cleese is some annoying British guy.

Llamas
03-11-2012, 10:34 AM
Cheese. Not Cleese. Haha. John Cheese is a comedy writer, and John Cleese is some annoying British guy.

Haha, I just went off what I saw 1565 write. Cleese is also a comedian, though, so I had no reason to double-check. ;)

Little_Miss_1565
03-11-2012, 12:36 PM
Lawl.

HAS FANCY LIBERAL ARTS BACHELOR'S DEGREE, CAN'T READ

Llamas
03-11-2012, 12:41 PM
Lawl.

HAS FANCY LIBERAL ARTS BACHELOR'S DEGREE, CAN'T READ

It all makes sense now! All along, we thought we couldn't get jobs because we were too smart, and were miserable big city dwelling pessimists, feeling entitled and spending our time hating on anyone who disagrees with our liberal opinions... when really, our degrees never taught us to read. And that's why we don't have jobs :( :( :(

Little_Miss_1565
03-11-2012, 12:46 PM
And that's why we don't have jobs :( :( :(

Especially those of us on a good career path that they got on due to their educations and experiences only attainable in big cities. We have no jobs. Even those of us with jobs.

StayInTheHouseCarl
03-11-2012, 12:56 PM
I think some of it has to do with watching people make money who are famous for nothing. People like paris hilton, the kardashians, spencer pratt. America kinda celebrates that culture now.

My younger sister ditched college after two weeks, and decided shes just going to be famous and write a memoir of her life. At 22...Unless its a memoir about running around and killing bears with your bare hands... I dont see that happening.

Little_Miss_1565
03-11-2012, 01:20 PM
I think some of it has to do with watching people make money who are famous for nothing. People like paris hilton, the kardashians, spencer pratt. America kinda celebrates that culture now.

My younger sister ditched college after two weeks, and decided shes just going to be famous and write a memoir of her life. At 22...Unless its a memoir about running around and killing bears with your bare hands... I dont see that happening.

Oh god. I am so bummed now.

Llamas
03-11-2012, 01:24 PM
Especially those of us on a good career path that they got on due to their educations and experiences only attainable in big cities. We have no jobs. Even those of us with jobs.

Exactly.


I think some of it has to do with watching people make money who are famous for nothing. People like paris hilton, the kardashians, spencer pratt. America kinda celebrates that culture now.

My younger sister ditched college after two weeks, and decided shes just going to be famous and write a memoir of her life. At 22...Unless its a memoir about running around and killing bears with your bare hands... I dont see that happening.

:-/ I had enough friends in high school move to NYC or California to try to make it big either in fashion or film. Most ended up back in the Midwest and work retail or have secretary jobs. For most people, the "American Dream" is doing nothing and getting paid a shit ton for it.

JohnnyNemesis
03-11-2012, 06:08 PM
And that's why we don't have jobs :( :( :(

we don't have jobs cause of the messicans and the immigants

even when it was the bears i knew it was the immigants