PDA

View Full Version : Maurice Sendak is DEAD



WebDudette
05-08-2012, 05:26 AM
The man who wrote Where the Wild Things Are has died at 83, completing the celebrity death cycle. Betty White has beat the odds and will get to live a little longer.


Maurice Sendak, widely considered the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century, who wrenched the picture book out of the safe, sanitized world of the nursery and plunged it into the dark, terrifying and hauntingly beautiful recesses of the human psyche, died on Tuesday in Danbury, Conn. He was 83 and lived in Ridgefield, Conn.

The cause was complications from a recent stroke, said Michael di Capua, his longtime editor.

Roundly praised, intermittently censored and occasionally eaten, Mr. Sendak’s books were essential ingredients of childhood for the generation born after 1960 or thereabouts, and in turn for their children. He was known in particular for more than a dozen picture books he wrote and illustrated himself, most famously “Where the Wild Things Are,” which was simultaneously genre-breaking and career-making when it was published by Harper & Row in 1963.

Among the other titles he wrote and illustrated, all from Harper & Row, are “In the Night Kitchen” (1970) and “Outside Over There” (1981), which together with “Where the Wild Things Are” form a trilogy; “The Sign on Rosie’s Door” (1960); “Higglety Pigglety Pop!” (1967); and “The Nutshell Library” (1962), a boxed set of four tiny volumes comprising “Alligators All Around,” “Chicken Soup With Rice,” “One Was Johnny” and “Pierre.” (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/09/books/maurice-sendak-childrens-author-dies-at-83.html)

Isolated Fury
05-08-2012, 05:53 AM
Did anyone else see that horribly retarded movie they made a couple years ago? I won't sit here and say "THE BOOK WAS SOOOOOOOOOO BETTER" or anything. It was just a bad movie. I didn't enjoy any part of it. And, yes, I know it's a kids movie, but I saw it when I was in the baby mood. I either went to see it shortly before or shortly after I had become a new dad.

killer_queen
05-08-2012, 06:32 AM
Can anyone tell me why the book is so much loved? Especially by adults? I bought a copy a few years ago and felt very surprised that it had so many fans around the world. It wasn't kind of a book that I would like to read or enjoy looking at the illustrations neither as an adult nor as a child. Anyone who puts so much meaning on kids' books annoy me endlessly. I can stand mugs with Little Prince illustrations, adult women who dress like Carroll's Alice but whenever someone starts to talk about how his favorite book was Where the wild things are when he was a kid I want to slap his face until he admits that he did not like any books when he was a kid and watched TV all the time.

Isolated Fury
05-08-2012, 07:15 AM
It gained popularity with goth/emo/really fucking annoying teenage girls. If you don't actually read the stupid thing, you'd assume it's about a kid that is trying to survive in a world of monsters and other things that will rip his stomach open and feed off of his bone marrow. But it's not about that at all. So if a teenage girl tells you "Yeah, my favorite book as a kid was Where the Wild Things Are," chances are she's lying. They want to get that response from you. She actually liked this as a kid??? No, probably not. Most of them have probably not read it, and the ones that have are going to assume you haven't read it and will give them the response they're looking for. Man... she's so dark and mysterious.

I remember seeing that book in the school library all the time as a kid. I also remember never seeing a single person look at that book. And I'm not trying to single out female readers here. But have you really ever heard a guy say they liked this book? (EDIT: except for that guy the you mentioned in your post...)

T-6005
05-08-2012, 10:23 AM
I remember reading it when I was seven or eight and learning English. That's literally all I remember about the book, that I read it.

I don't think I had a favorite book until I was eight or nine, and at the time I was evenly split between Hatchet and the Chronicles of Narnia. I have no defense for either, that is just the way it was.

Having said that, I suppose I'm sad the author is dead, since he seemed to be very conscientious of fans of the book. But what sticks out at me even more in this is - is no one allowed to die from 'old age' anymore?

Sure, 'old age' never killed anybody in the first place, and this is still within the realm of natural causes, but I didn't need to know he died from complications from a stroke. He was 83 years old, and while people live to be a decade or two older, they also often don't. If he died of natural causes, I don't particularly feel the need to be informed about what those causes are, and it's begun to bother me - not because of any moral bent I have about people's deaths, but just because it throws a fact in there just because it's a fact.

killer_queen
05-08-2012, 11:04 AM
It gained popularity with goth/emo/really fucking annoying teenage girls. If you don't actually read the stupid thing, you'd assume it's about a kid that is trying to survive in a world of monsters and other things that will rip his stomach open and feed off of his bone marrow. But it's not about that at all. So if a teenage girl tells you "Yeah, my favorite book as a kid was Where the Wild Things Are," chances are she's lying. They want to get that response from you. She actually liked this as a kid??? No, probably not. Most of them have probably not read it, and the ones that have are going to assume you haven't read it and will give them the response they're looking for. Man... she's so dark and mysterious.

I remember seeing that book in the school library all the time as a kid. I also remember never seeing a single person look at that book. And I'm not trying to single out female readers here. But have you really ever heard a guy say they liked this book? (EDIT: except for that guy the you mentioned in your post...)
Yes actually, a few. And they are all Spike Jonze fans so I know they are lying. Oh and there is also the fact that the book has never been translated into Turkish.
And there's no way that a kid could think the book is dark & mysterious. Children's minds don't work that way, they don't just think "wow, this is a great use of "uncanny". as soon as mom finishes reading this I'm going to check Freud's article".

This was the only book I found dark and mysterious as a child:
http://images.wikia.com/muppet/images/e/e9/Scaredofthedark.jpg

Defender
05-08-2012, 01:38 PM
Did anyone else see that horribly retarded movie they made a couple years ago? I won't sit here and say "THE BOOK WAS SOOOOOOOOOO BETTER" or anything. It was just a bad movie. I didn't enjoy any part of it.

Yeah, I saw it and I did disappointed. I saw it with my little nephew because of the good reviews. They said that this movie is one of the best children's films. I 'd never been able to identify with this movie. It was so tiring and weird.

jacknife737
05-08-2012, 03:53 PM
I remember liking where the Wild Things are when I was little. There was a mural on the wall of my elementary school's library some if it's characters on it which I used to think was pretty cool.

I enjoyed his interview on Colbert a couple months ago.

KickHimWhenHe'sDown
05-10-2012, 08:46 PM
I've never read it, nor have I seen the movie. I feel left out.

Isolated Fury
05-10-2012, 08:49 PM
I've never read it, nor have I seen the movie. I feel left out.
Y'all ain't missing much.