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OC HAU
07-19-2012, 12:17 AM
juxtaposition
discombobulated
gnarled

I can't believe they exist.

WebDudette
07-19-2012, 12:20 AM
gnarly brah.

Jojan
07-19-2012, 08:30 AM
These are rather inane

Thorough
Though
Thought
Through
Tough

Llamas
07-19-2012, 11:11 AM
Dearest creature in creation
Studying English pronunciation,
I will teach you in my verse
Sounds like corpse, corps, horse and worse.
I will keep you, Susy, busy,
Make your head with heat grow dizzy;
Tear in eye, your dress you'll tear;
Queer, fair seer, hear my prayer.
Pray, console your loving poet,
Make my coat look new, dear, sew it!
Just compare heart, hear and heard,
Dies and diet, lord and word.
Sword and sward, retain and Britain
(Mind the latter how it's written).
Made has not the sound of bade,
Say-said, pay-paid, laid but plaid.
Now I surely will not plague you
With such words as vague and ague,
But be careful how you speak,
Say: gush, bush, steak, streak, break, bleak ,
Previous, precious, fuchsia, via
Recipe, pipe, studding-sail, choir;
Woven, oven, how and low,
Script, receipt, shoe, poem, toe.
Say, expecting fraud and trickery:
Daughter, laughter and Terpsichore,
Branch, ranch, measles, topsails, aisles,
Missiles, similes, reviles.
Wholly, holly, signal, signing,
Same, examining, but mining,
Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
Solar, mica, war and far.
From "desire": desirable-admirable from "admire",
Lumber, plumber, bier, but brier,
Topsham, brougham, renown, but known,
Knowledge, done, lone, gone, none, tone,
One, anemone, Balmoral,
Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel.
Gertrude, German, wind and wind,
Beau, kind, kindred, queue, mankind,
Tortoise, turquoise, chamois-leather,
Reading, Reading, heathen, heather.
This phonetic labyrinth
Gives moss, gross, brook, brooch, ninth, plinth.
Have you ever yet endeavoured
To pronounce revered and severed,
Demon, lemon, ghoul, foul, soul,
Peter, petrol and patrol?
Billet does not end like ballet;
Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
Blood and flood are not like food,
Nor is mould like should and would.
Banquet is not nearly parquet,
Which exactly rhymes with khaki.
Discount, viscount, load and broad,
Toward, to forward, to reward,
Ricocheted and crocheting, croquet?
Right! Your pronunciation's OK.
Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
Friend and fiend, alive and live.
Is your r correct in higher?
Keats asserts it rhymes Thalia.
Hugh, but hug, and hood, but hoot,
Buoyant, minute, but minute.
Say abscission with precision,
Now: position and transition;
Would it tally with my rhyme
If I mentioned paradigm?
Twopence, threepence, tease are easy,
But cease, crease, grease and greasy?
Cornice, nice, valise, revise,
Rabies, but lullabies.
Of such puzzling words as nauseous,
Rhyming well with cautious, tortious,
You'll envelop lists, I hope,
In a linen envelope.
Would you like some more? You'll have it!
Affidavit, David, davit.
To abjure, to perjure. Sheik
Does not sound like Czech but ache.

Godxilla
07-19-2012, 12:28 PM
That's why I love English. Not because I'm fluent in it. But because that despite the fact that I am fluent in English, there is still a whole legion of words that I cannot comprehend.

One of the oddest words I've ever seen is appellation. It means 'name'.

Llamas
07-19-2012, 12:39 PM
That's why I love English. Not because I'm fluent in it. But because that despite the fact that I am fluent in English, there is still a whole legion of words that I cannot comprehend.

One of the oddest words I've ever seen is appellation. It means 'name'.

It's actually more similar in meaning to "designation" than "name". However, the huge list of words is definitely not unique to English. Other big languages like Chinese, Spanish, French, German, and Russian have just as huge a variety of words that the average speaker of the language is unaware of.

I do like English, though. It's a fascinating language due to how it came about. On the surface, the pronunciation seems to have no rules... but there are actually very real and specific reasons for the pronunciations. One simply needs to take a look at the etymologies.

Godxilla
07-19-2012, 06:18 PM
Yes, they call English a Germanic language, but it's awful close to a Romance language as well. Hell, we even have several words from Japan and India. I love studying language, and I do have a mediocre grasp of French. I can say a few things in Japanese and German, and I love how so many of these languages have cognatives galore. And by the way, Llamas, I really liked that poem. I assume you didn't do it, so I must ask, who did?

RageAndLov
07-19-2012, 06:55 PM
My biggest pet peeve in regards the English language is how compound words are mostly separated. Even the compound word "compound word" is separated. At times it makes a sentence hard to read, especially when many compound words are next to each other and the words could be used as both nouns and verbs.
When English is so much based on German, why couldn't it have taken the Germanic tradition of combining compound words, if only with a hyphen.

Llamas
07-19-2012, 07:27 PM
Yes, they call English a Germanic language, but it's awful close to a Romance language as well. Hell, we even have several words from Japan and India. I love studying language, and I do have a mediocre grasp of French. I can say a few things in Japanese and German, and I love how so many of these languages have cognatives galore. And by the way, Llamas, I really liked that poem. I assume you didn't do it, so I must ask, who did?E

English is absolutely a Germanic language. It may have borrowed words from many languages, but at its core - its grammar, structure, and core vocabulary - it's absolutely Germanic.

Glad you liked the poem. Not mine, of course (though I wish it were!) Here's the full poem, with author included :) http://ncf.idallen.com/english.html


My biggest pet peeve in regards the English language is how compound words are mostly separated. Even the compound word "compound word" is separated. At times it makes a sentence hard to read, especially when many compound words are next to each other and the words could be used as both nouns and verbs.
When English is so much based on German, why couldn't it have taken the Germanic tradition of combining compound words, if only with a hyphen.
I think it'd be great if English followed a consistent rule for this, but one thing I'm super glad we didn't take from German is those ultra-long, ridiculously complex compound words. I'd much rather have them split up a bit than having words like Hoechsgeschwindigkeitsbegrenzung and Sicherheitsmassnahmen everywhere (seriously, I'd much rather "maximum speed limit" and "safety precautions", as in, multiple words).

XYlophonetreeZ
07-19-2012, 08:57 PM
I do like English, though. It's a fascinating language due to how it came about. On the surface, the pronunciation seems to have no rules... but there are actually very real and specific reasons for the pronunciations. One simply needs to take a look at the etymologies.

Well, that's just the thing. In a language like Spanish, that's not even necessary. Pronunciation rules are clear and straightforward. I'm pretty much fluent in Spanish and off the top of my head, I don't think I can name a single exception to their basic pronunciation rules.

TheJakes84
07-20-2012, 09:18 AM
dearest creature in creation
studying english pronunciation,
i will teach you in my verse
sounds like corpse, corps, horse and worse.
I will keep you, susy, busy,
make your head with heat grow dizzy;
tear in eye, your dress you'll tear;
queer, fair seer, hear my prayer.
pray, console your loving poet,
make my coat look new, dear, sew it!
Just compare heart, hear and heard,
dies and diet, lord and word.
sword and sward, retain and britain
(mind the latter how it's written).
made has not the sound of bade,
say-said, pay-paid, laid but plaid.
Now i surely will not plague you
with such words as vague and ague,
but be careful how you speak,
say: gush, bush, steak, streak, break, bleak ,
previous, precious, fuchsia, via
recipe, pipe, studding-sail, choir;
woven, oven, how and low,
script, receipt, shoe, poem, toe.
Say, expecting fraud and trickery:
daughter, laughter and terpsichore,
branch, ranch, measles, topsails, aisles,
missiles, similes, reviles.
wholly, holly, signal, signing,
same, examining, but mining,
scholar, vicar, and cigar,
solar, mica, war and far.
From "desire": desirable-admirable from "admire",
lumber, plumber, bier, but brier,
topsham, brougham, renown, but known,
knowledge, done, lone, gone, none, tone,
one, anemone, balmoral,
kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel.
gertrude, german, wind and wind,
beau, kind, kindred, queue, mankind,
tortoise, turquoise, chamois-leather,
reading, reading, heathen, heather.
This phonetic labyrinth
gives moss, gross, brook, brooch, ninth, plinth.
Have you ever yet endeavoured
to pronounce revered and severed,
demon, lemon, ghoul, foul, soul,
peter, petrol and patrol?
billet does not end like ballet;
bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
blood and flood are not like food,
nor is mould like should and would.
banquet is not nearly parquet,
which exactly rhymes with khaki.
discount, viscount, load and broad,
toward, to forward, to reward,
ricocheted and crocheting, croquet?
Right! Your pronunciation's ok.
rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
friend and fiend, alive and live.
Is your r correct in higher?
Keats asserts it rhymes thalia.
hugh, but hug, and hood, but hoot,
buoyant, minute, but minute.
Say abscission with precision,
now: position and transition;
would it tally with my rhyme
if i mentioned paradigm?
twopence, threepence, tease are easy,
but cease, crease, grease and greasy?
cornice, nice, valise, revise,
rabies, but lullabies.
Of such puzzling words as nauseous,
rhyming well with cautious, tortious,
you'll envelop lists, i hope,
in a linen envelope.
Would you like some more? You'll have it!
affidavit, david, davit.
To abjure, to perjure. sheik
does not sound like czech but ache.

Creativity meets originality.
Cleverity met ilovellamas.

OC HAU
07-20-2012, 01:10 PM
I love the word baloney. Just stumbled upon it.

Godxilla
07-20-2012, 03:41 PM
Llamas:
I think it'd be great if English followed a consistent rule for this, but one thing I'm super glad we didn't take from German is those ultra-long, ridiculously complex compound words. I'd much rather have them split up a bit than having words like Hoechsgeschwindigkeitsbegrenzung and Sicherheitsmassnahmen everywhere (seriously, I'd much rather "maximum speed limit" and "safety precautions", as in, multiple words).[/QUOTE]

Or Bundesnachrichtensienst. I haven't said it right once. I like the way that English doesn't slap together long words.

KickHimWhenHe'sDown
07-20-2012, 07:32 PM
I love the word baloney. Just stumbled upon it.

Isn't that slang?

OC HAU
07-20-2012, 07:42 PM
My dictionary says American English. Internet says slang. Does it matter?

fefe10000
07-20-2012, 08:26 PM
I is a good citizen

Llamas
07-20-2012, 09:04 PM
Well, that's just the thing. In a language like Spanish, that's not even necessary. Pronunciation rules are clear and straightforward. I'm pretty much fluent in Spanish and off the top of my head, I don't think I can name a single exception to their basic pronunciation rules.

Like I was saying before, English has some of the most confusing pronunciation in the world. It's absolutely a bitch to teach (which explains why I seem to be the ONLY English teacher I know who actually enjoys teaching it...), and it sure is hard to know how to pronounce new words. But my point there was that despite its difficulty, the rich history and culture that made it so is amazing and fascinating.

Jojan
07-21-2012, 02:43 AM
"Plough" and "gaol" are fun.

RageAndLov
07-21-2012, 05:13 AM
I think it'd be great if English followed a consistent rule for this, but one thing I'm super glad we didn't take from German is those ultra-long, ridiculously complex compound words. I'd much rather have them split up a bit than having words like Hoechsgeschwindigkeitsbegrenzung and Sicherheitsmassnahmen everywhere (seriously, I'd much rather "maximum speed limit" and "safety precautions", as in, multiple words).

Safteyprecautions is more readable to me. That might have something to do with my native language being a Germanic one. But the words are separated by an 's' in compound words, like "sicherheitSmassnahmen" which makes it easier to read. As there is no such thing in English, a hyphen would do. Just SOMETHING in order to show that the two words form together a compound word.

KickHimWhenHe'sDown
07-21-2012, 10:13 AM
My dictionary says American English. Internet says slang. Does it matter?
Not really. I'll keep using bologna on my sandwiches just in case.

Llamas
07-21-2012, 03:06 PM
Safteyprecautions is more readable to me. That might have something to do with my native language being a Germanic one. But the words are separated by an 's' in compound words, like "sicherheitSmassnahmen" which makes it easier to read. As there is no such thing in English, a hyphen would do. Just SOMETHING in order to show that the two words form together a compound word.

I dunno, I guess I've never had a student who wasn't sure whether or not something was a compound word, so that has never been an issue. I merely wish we had a strict rule for it. Sometimes they're separate words (safety precautions), sometimes they're hyphenated (log-in), and sometimes they're one word (skateboard). That's the only part I dislike about that.


Not really. I'll keep using bologna on my sandwiches just in case.
Seriously. I'm American, and I've never once spelled it "baloney". Weird.

Godxilla
07-21-2012, 03:36 PM
Not really. I'll keep using bologna on my sandwiches just in case.

Good call. Better safe than sorry.

OC HAU
07-21-2012, 07:47 PM
You guys want to know why do I like baloney? It reminds me of balloon and loony. Fuckin' baloney, I'm going to popularize it.

And Bologne is Boloňa. Spaghetti Bolognese.