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bighead384
12-07-2012, 08:52 AM
I constantly make grammatical errors, especially on my first 'draft' or attempt. And then of course, there's also typos, which is kind of a different subject. I'll still mess up the most basic shit, like "to" and "too". Furthermore, there's some "problem words" for me that I always have trouble spelling. If you think about it, it's ridiculous to have problems spelling a certain words over and over again, because you'd think all you need to do is look it up once. Or just look at it after spell check corrects it. Anyway, I've always been kind of curious what it's like for other people.

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-07-2012, 09:32 AM
To be honest, I rarely make any grammatical errors and I notice them when anyone else makes them, though I'm prone to spelling equation as "equasion" when typing quickly. I initially make a few typos because my fingers are always cold and due to the elbow and wrist issues I have. But I proofread before I post. Anyone else OCD over perfect grammar?

On a side note, Noodles has excellent grammar and punctuation skills. I think I've only spotted 2 or 3 errors/typos in all the tweets of his that I've read.

samseby
12-07-2012, 09:45 AM
I try not to make any and proofread too but well shit happens ... ;)
But what really gives me a hard time sometimes is whenever I write something in English to make it sound "natural" ... German grammar and the structure of sentences are quite different from the English and I hate it when what I write doesn't sound correct and fluent.

Tiny Vessels
12-07-2012, 10:10 AM
I am such a horrible speller. If I'm having problems spelling a word I'll try spelling it out in sign language first, then if I still can't get it I'll try writting it out and if it still looks wrong to me I'll use spell check or I'll ask someone.

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-07-2012, 11:15 AM
I try not to make any and proofread too but well shit happens ... ;)
But what really gives me a hard time sometimes is whenever I write something in English to make it sound "natural" ... German grammar and the structure of sentences are quite different from the English and I hate it when what I write doesn't sound correct and fluent.

Yeah, English and German grammar are different. They seem to be based on the same idea but have gone their own ways and changed. Knowing the correct infinitives, proper word order and knowing where commas go in sentences was always an issue for me in German class. However, we were not expected to get that correctly with only German I and German II available in my college. I'd like to get back to practicing it, but I don't know anyone who knows it to see if I am doing it correctly.
By the way, what you wrote now sounds pretty natural to me. ^,^

Alison
12-07-2012, 11:56 AM
I think I'm pretty confident in my grammatical skills.

I remember recently looking at my 1st year college essays and being appalled at the quality of the writing (compared to it now. I know I have better grammar than some of my friends; you'd swear some of them were twelve by the way they write.

I'm sure I still make mistakes if I'm not concentrating. And I'm sure there are those sentences that, although sounding right, are grammatically incorrect. A lot of those things are down to preferences though, I think. Different systems for American and British Universities.

What really threw me off was the use of an apostrophe for, say, Thomas. I was told that instead of "Thomas' car", it should be "Thomas's car", after years of being taught the former (although the former applies for ancient historical figures). I know this is a preference, rather than a rule, so I'm never sure what to do in this case.

Llamas
12-07-2012, 12:45 PM
Every single post so far in this thread has at least one grammatical error I could point out. :P I've been teaching English as a foreign language to adults and teenagers in Europe for over three years, though, and thus have better grammar than nearly everyone* I know.

*The only people I know who've got better grammar than I do are non-native speakers who've finished master's degrees or PhDs in English pedagogy. Native speakers almost always have worse grammar than non-natives with such education, which seems a bit counterintuitive. :)

nieh
12-07-2012, 01:44 PM
I never make grammatical error.

Godxilla
12-07-2012, 02:19 PM
Grammar errors?
Never.
Spelling mistakkes? Maybe....

_Lost_
12-07-2012, 03:17 PM
I'm prone to making the same grammatical and spelling mistakes over and over. It is avoidable and I usually notice them when I read what I have written, but they still happen. I tend to combine "every time" into one word. Llamas has pointed it out more than once. :p

Llamas
12-07-2012, 03:25 PM
I'm prone to making the same grammatical and spelling mistakes over and over. It is avoidable and I usually notice them when I read what I have written, but they still happen. I tend to combine "every time" into one word. Llamas has pointed it out more than once. :p

This is the first post in the thread (besides mine) which has no grammatical errors (intentional or accidental) ;)

Dulce
12-07-2012, 03:26 PM
Excellent speeches? No.
Spelling errors? Yes.
Perfect punctuation? No.
Proper grammar? No.
Is English my second language? Ummmm, no it isn't.
My Spanish is not decently appropriate due to cussing! :rolleyes:

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-07-2012, 05:16 PM
Apparently, the biggest crime you can commit while making a speech is uttering umm, uhh, or like between your thoughts.

T-6005
12-07-2012, 05:25 PM
I don't make mistakes. Sometimes the English language is wrong.

randman21
12-07-2012, 06:02 PM
Not very prone. For somenone with only a year of grammar training, I do well. Spelling mistakes are practically non-existent. That's with writing, though.

When speaking, I tend to lose my train of thought in the middle of sentences, causing all kinds of grammar issues and interesting word pronunciations. Last night at work, I was talking about something, and I said something like, "I've hasn't hads a problem with those." I had myself a good laugh over that one.

_Lost_
12-07-2012, 08:47 PM
Wait... so you are telling me that, in real life, you are capable of stringing more than a couple words together? wtf?

Cheese, I am awesome.

Llamas
12-07-2012, 08:59 PM
Not very prone. For somenone with only a year of grammar training, I do well. Spelling mistakes are practically non-existent. That's with writing, though.

When speaking, I tend to lose my train of thought in the middle of sentences, causing all kinds of grammar issues and interesting word pronunciations. Last night at work, I was talking about something, and I said something like, "I've hasn't hads a problem with those." I had myself a good laugh over that one.

You honestly have some of the best written English grammar I've seen on the web. I can't say anything regarding how you talk since I haven't ever talked to you in person, but as far as people I interact with online go, you're at the top. ;)


Cheese, I am awesome.

Damn straight!

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-07-2012, 09:06 PM
I fret more over having impeccable grammar when I write school reports. However, my personality virtually disappears when I write them because I become full-on nerdified.

Does anyone else become rather lax with their grammar in everyday texts or posts as opposed to important reports?

_Lost_
12-07-2012, 09:20 PM
Proper English and spoken English are two very different creatures. We have a rule book for what is considered correct grammar, but a lot of those rules go out the window when it comes to dialect. Most people speak differently among their friends than they would in an interview. It is very rare for someone to speak and write with perfect grammar all the time. If I met someone that did, I would spend the whole evening telling my husband about how they talk like a fag and their shits all retarded.

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-07-2012, 09:23 PM
Haha, yeah. This is very totally true! I would assume most people switch to their speaking grammar when posting on a forum such as this one or texting to their friends. On a side note, I HATE textspeak.

Llamas
12-07-2012, 09:43 PM
It is very rare for someone to speak and write with perfect grammar all the time. If I met someone that did,
Maria. lololol.


their shits all retarded.
:mad::mad::mad:

I like how Melyssa goes from saying she "OCDs over perfect grammar" and rarely makes mistakes... but then switches to claiming that she's "lax" with her grammar in most situations.

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-07-2012, 10:14 PM
I like how Melyssa goes from saying she "OCDs over perfect grammar" and rarely makes mistakes... but then switches to claiming that she's "lax" with her grammar in most situations.

You would understand what I mean if you read any of my in-depth scientific research topics. I sound like a completely different person.
Hmm, grammar was not the right term. I should have said vocabulary and the way I word things, as well as my sentence structure.

samseby
12-08-2012, 01:17 AM
By the way, what you wrote now sounds pretty natural to me. ^,^
Well, thanks ;)
So did you enjoy studying German? Honestly I think it's one of the hardest languages to study - besides Latin that is. French, Spanish and Italian are way easier as far as I'm concerned.
Another thing that happens to me from time to time is that I mix up vocabulary i.e. I turn certain Spanish vocabulary into French or certain French vocabulary into English etc. :p and I tend to mix up BE and AE too.
The usage of grammar and the right spelling also depend on what and when you are writing. On the internet people (including myself :p) often don't pay that much attention to grammar and spelling ... if talking to someone it depends. I have problems finding the right words sometimes so I might actually use 'Um ...' a lot too. The usage of proper English punctuation is another one of my weak points.
But all in all I guess I can make myself understood so ... it's all good.

WebDudette
12-08-2012, 01:28 AM
I have ridiculously terrible spelling and grammar when I use my phone, unfortunately I post almost exclusively from that now days. I guess I could change that, but I don't typically have the time to proof read if I am posting from my phone, and I'm not that bothered by it either way. I certainly do not have perfect grammar, or even close to perfect, but a lot of my 'mistakes' are intentional. I use not real words a lot and feel like I use way more commas than any person should, then again, I'm not to up to date on grammatical rules, so I'm not entirely sure. I think I spell most words correctly and generally keep stuff like to, too, two, and you, your, you're straight. I believe Allison mentioned it, I always say 'Thomas' house' 'Thomas's house' looks so fucking weird and wrong to me, I believe I even do it with a name like Prince, when speaking and in writing.

So, how do people feel about the oxford comma?

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-08-2012, 01:55 AM
Well, thanks ;)
So did you enjoy studying German? Honestly I think it's one of the hardest languages to study - besides Latin that is. French, Spanish and Italian are way easier as far as I'm concerned.
Another thing that happens to me from time to time is that I mix up vocabulary i.e. I turn certain Spanish vocabulary into French or certain French vocabulary into English etc. :p and I tend to mix up BE and AE too.
The usage of grammar and the right spelling also depend on what and when you are writing. On the internet people (including myself :p) often don't pay that much attention to grammar and spelling ... if talking to someone it depends. I have problems finding the right words sometimes so I might actually use 'Um ...' a lot too. The usage of proper English punctuation is another one of my weak points.
But all in all I guess I can make myself understood so ... it's all good.

I picked up the German vocabulary extremely quickly and easily. Learning to conjugate verbs and the modal verbs took a bit of practice and everyone had trouble pluralizing nouns because there are four (right?) different ways to do it with no concrete rules or patterns.
I know what you mean. And I meant it's a crime using uhh's and stuff in public speeches. In everyday speech, it's perfectly acceptable unless you incorporate "like" into every phrase. See? I began a sentence with "and" and I don't give a shit. XP

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-08-2012, 01:59 AM
I have ridiculously terrible spelling and grammar when I use my phone, unfortunately I post almost exclusively from that now days. I guess I could change that, but I don't typically have the time to proof read if I am posting from my phone, and I'm not that bothered by it either way. I certainly do not have perfect grammar, or even close to perfect, but a lot of my 'mistakes' are intentional. I use not real words a lot and feel like I use way more commas than any person should, then again, I'm not to up to date on grammatical rules, so I'm not entirely sure. I think I spell most words correctly and generally keep stuff like to, too, two, and you, your, you're straight. I believe Allison mentioned it, I always say 'Thomas' house' 'Thomas's house' looks so fucking weird and wrong to me, I believe I even do it with a name like Prince, when speaking and in writing.

So, how do people feel about the oxford comma?

Oh, trust me, there are many times when it is appropriate, and grammatically correct, to use a lot of commas. It depends on the point you are trying to emphasize and all kinds of technical crap like that.

samseby
12-08-2012, 03:59 AM
I picked up the German vocabulary extremely quickly and easily. Learning to conjugate verbs and the modal verbs took a bit of practice and everyone had trouble pluralizing nouns because there are four (right?) different ways to do it with no concrete rules or patterns.
I know what you mean. And I meant it's a crime using uhh's and stuff in public speeches. In everyday speech, it's perfectly acceptable unless you incorporate "like" into every phrase. See? I began a sentence with "and" and I don't give a shit. XP
Yep, German grammar ain't easy at all and if German wasn't my mother tongue I guess I would not have chosen to study it :p
But do you want to know what's (at least for me) worse than typos or wrong grammar?
This :p

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icOO7Ut1P4Y
Energy Commissioner Günther H. Oettinger (European Commission) Yikes! So wrong ...

Llamas
12-08-2012, 05:30 AM
Well, thanks ;)
So did you enjoy studying German? Honestly I think it's one of the hardest languages to study - besides Latin that is. French, Spanish and Italian are way easier as far as I'm concerned.
Another thing that happens to me from time to time is that I mix up vocabulary i.e. I turn certain Spanish vocabulary into French or certain French vocabulary into English etc. :p and I tend to mix up BE and AE too.
The usage of grammar and the right spelling also depend on what and when you are writing. On the internet people (including myself :p) often don't pay that much attention to grammar and spelling ... if talking to someone it depends. I have problems finding the right words sometimes so I might actually use 'Um ...' a lot too. The usage of proper English punctuation is another one of my weak points.
But all in all I guess I can make myself understood so ... it's all good.

German only seems difficult (for an English speaker, of course - it'd be a lot harder for someone who speaks an Asian language, for example) until one attempts to learn a Slavic language. Ich spreche fließend Deutsch, und ich fand es schwer in Gymnazium... aber jetzt wohne ich in Slowenien, und ich war zwei Jahren in die Tschechischen Republik. Diese zwei Sprachen sind VIEL schwerer als Deutsch! German has four cases; Slovene has 6 cases; Czech has 7 cases. Slovene also has a dual - not just "du" (ti) or "ihr" (vi), but also (vidva), which is like, the two of you. And that also changes depending on gender. Also, in German the gender of the noun affects the noun and the adjective, but in Slavic languages, it also affects the verb. And the person's gender also affects it. So a guy saying "I drink" has different conjugation of "drink" than a girl saying it.

German is easy peasy compared to this Slavic shit ;) ;)


You would understand what I mean if you read any of my in-depth scientific research topics. I sound like a completely different person.
Hmm, grammar was not the right term. I should have said vocabulary and the way I word things, as well as my sentence structure.

You posted one once. It read like an academic paper. That's simply called adjusting register. Most normal people do that. I do, as well. Anyway, if that's all you meant, you make a lot more mistakes than you think in everyday life. :P


So, how do people feel about the oxford comma?

I'm a strong believer in it. I see no point in not using it.

_Lost_
12-08-2012, 06:28 AM
:mad::mad::mad:

Its a movie quote, Cheese.

nieh
12-08-2012, 08:19 AM
*The only people I know who've got better grammar than I do are non-native speakers who've finished master's degrees or PhDs in English pedagogy. Native speakers almost always have worse grammar than non-natives with such education, which seems a bit counterintuitive. :)

I disagree. Someone who lives in a culture is surrounded by much more casual usage of the language and it rubs off on them, whereas someone whose only real exposure to it is from classes is a lot more likely to be proper. This is not just the case with English, I'd wager.

samseby
12-08-2012, 09:42 AM
German only seems difficult (for an English speaker, of course - it'd be a lot harder for someone who speaks an Asian language, for example) until one attempts to learn a Slavic language. Ich spreche fließend Deutsch, und ich fand es schwer in Gymnazium... aber jetzt wohne ich in Slowenien, und ich war zwei Jahren in die Tschechischen Republik. Diese zwei Sprachen sind VIEL schwerer als Deutsch! German has four cases; Slovene has 6 cases; Czech has 7 cases. Slovene also has a dual - not just "du" (ti) or "ihr" (vi), but also (vidva), which is like, the two of you. And that also changes depending on gender. Also, in German the gender of the noun affects the noun and the adjective, but in Slavic languages, it also affects the verb. And the person's gender also affects it. So a guy saying "I drink" has different conjugation of "drink" than a girl saying it.

German is easy peasy compared to this Slavic shit ;) ;)

This I didn't know ;) I can only compare German to English, French, Spanish, Italian and the little Latin I studied. So no Slavic language for me. Your German is really good BTW ;)

Offspring-Junkie
12-08-2012, 03:23 PM
No, it's not.

Edit: It's better than Samseby's google translator skills.

Llamas
12-08-2012, 07:42 PM
This I didn't know ;) I can only compare German to English, French, Spanish, Italian and the little Latin I studied. So no Slavic language for me. Your German is really good BTW ;)

:) Yeah, if you compare learning German to learning any Latin language, German is really hard :D And thanks, but I'm TERRIBLY out of practice. I used to be level C1 in the CEF, but nowadays I'm probably B1. I have very few opportunities to use my German these days (I use it when I'm in Austria, and when some parents of my students don't speak English, since most older people here are more likely to speak German than English), but otherwise, it's almost never :( So I've lost a TON of my grammar and especially vocabulary. It also doesn't help that while I'm NOT using my German, I'm busy learning Slovene... so Slovene in many ways is starting to replace German, since I encounter it on a daily basis. Your English is really good, though. Woher kommst du? :)

And thanks for trying to insult my German, Junkie; if you learned how to use conditionals and the difference between separating clauses and full sentences, I might take your feedback more seriously. ;)

Offspring-Junkie
12-09-2012, 07:52 AM
And thanks for trying to insult my German, Junkie; if you learned how to use conditionals and the difference between separating clauses and full sentences, I might take your feedback more seriously. ;)

I guess your German is good, but you made obvious mistakes any native German speaker would have seen at first sight.


und ich fand es schwer in Gymnazium... aber jetzt wohne ich in Slowenien, und ich war zwei Jahren in die Tschechischen Republik.

...und ich fand es schwer im Gymnasium... aber jetzt wohne ich in Slowenien und war zwei Jahre (it's Plural without "n") in der Tschechischen Republik.

I do believe that you were good and still are good in German, but I was trying to give you guys a hint about Samseby. "She" doesn't know a single word German. You can test "her". Any native speaker would have seen this mistakes easily. But I guess "she's" not native blah, blah, because [insert random excuse].

I did learn German in school, but more importantly I grew up with it. I can't tell you the rules when to use "Jahre" or "Jahren" because it's both plural. If you use "vor Jahren" (years before) or "in den Jahren" (in the years of/between) you use the plural with "n". Don't ask me why, I'm not sure if they taught us in school, I don't think so.

Llamas
12-09-2012, 08:39 AM
I guess your German is good, but you made obvious mistakes any native German speaker would have seen at first sight.

...I'm not a native speaker, and never learned German very extensively. I learned it in high school, and then in college I had to write my papers and read books in German. In the last 3.5 years, I've had almost NO exposure to the language. I know I make tons of mistakes, but I doubt there are many people who aren't native speakers of German and don't live in a German-speaking country but utilize German at an amazing level.



I do believe that you were good and still are good in German, but I was trying to give you guys a hint about Samseby. "She" doesn't know a single word German. You can test "her". Any native speaker would have seen this mistakes easily. But I guess "she's" not native blah, blah, because [insert random excuse].
Wtf? I'm sure Samseby noticed the mistakes. Just because she didn't point them all out and instead was positive (I'm the same way with people here who speak English with me - I don't correct all their mistakes, and instead reassure them that their English is good and that I understand them.)

I can correct your mistakes in English, too.


I guess your German is good, but you made obvious mistakes any native German speaker would have seen at first sight.

...und ich fand es schwer im Gymnasium... aber jetzt wohne ich in Slowenien und war zwei Jahre (it's plural without "n") in der Tschechischen Republik.

I do believe that you were good and are still good in German, but I was trying to give you guys a hint about Samseby. "She" doesn't know a single word German. You can test "her". Any native speaker would have seen these mistakes easily. But I guess "she's" not native blah, blah, because [insert random excuse].

I did learn German in school, but more importantly I grew up with it. I can't tell you the rules regarding when to use "Jahre" or "Jahren" because both are plural. If you use "vor Jahren" (years before) or "in den Jahren" (in the years of/between), you use the plural with "n". Don't ask me why. I'm not sure if they taught us in school - I don't think so.

See, but there was no point in that. You make mistakes, but your English is good. I understand you just fine, and that's what's important. So why couldn't I just simply tell you your English is good? Why would that imply that I'm not a native speaker of English?

BagOfShenanigans
12-09-2012, 12:26 PM
Does anyone here share my irritation with people who confuse "lose" and "loose"?

jacknife737
12-09-2012, 01:48 PM
Pretty rarely; especially if i'm doing something for school or work, or stuff like emails.

On occasion you'll find a slip up on say a bbs or other message board post; though i suppose that's the case for everyone.

samseby
12-10-2012, 05:44 AM
I do believe that you were good and still are good in German, but I was trying to give you guys a hint about Samseby. "She" doesn't know a single word German. You can test "her". Any native speaker would have seen this mistakes easily. But I guess "she's" not native blah, blah, because [insert random excuse].
Ouch!
http://www.offspring.com/community/showthread.php?45764-2012-05-29-Hamburg-Stadtpark-
Ziemlich dumm gelaufen, würde ich mal sagen ...
Next time before opting to call someone a liar better do your homework properly!

Offspring-Junkie
12-10-2012, 07:54 AM
...I'm not a native speaker, and never learned German very extensively. I learned it in high school, and then in college I had to write my papers and read books in German. In the last 3.5 years, I've had almost NO exposure to the language. I know I make tons of mistakes, but I doubt there are many people who aren't native speakers of German and don't live in a German-speaking country but utilize German at an amazing level.



Wtf? I'm sure Samseby noticed the mistakes. Just because she didn't point them all out and instead was positive (I'm the same way with people here who speak English with me - I don't correct all their mistakes, and instead reassure them that their English is good and that I understand them.)

I can correct your mistakes in English, too.



See, but there was no point in that. You make mistakes, but your English is good. I understand you just fine, and that's what's important. So why couldn't I just simply tell you your English is good? Why would that imply that I'm not a native speaker of English?

If you see someone post two sentences and the second one is obviously completely wrong, would consider replying "Your English is good?"

Offspring-Junkie
12-10-2012, 07:59 AM
Ouch!
http://www.offspring.com/community/showthread.php?45764-2012-05-29-Hamburg-Stadtpark-
Ziemlich dumm gelaufen, würde ich mal sagen ...
Next time before opting to call someone a liar better do your homework properly!

Schieb dir deine Hausaufgaben sonstwo hin!

Offspring-Junkie
12-12-2012, 07:13 AM
Do you mind if users are having alternative accounts?

RageAndLov
12-12-2012, 11:18 AM
In regards of the English language, I have a problem with prepositions. In English, there are no rules for prepositions, you just have to learn them. I find it very annoying, although it has its historical reasons.

Another thing I sometimes have an issue with, is subject-verb agreement. If I write in a hurry, I could say something like "The things I learnt is good" instead of "the things I learnt are good". The reason for this is that in my native language, we don't have subject agreement in that sense as the verb never changes in relation to the subject. It is "I are, you are, he are, we are".

Offspring-Junkie
12-15-2012, 08:52 AM
Do you mind if users are having alternative accounts?

I asked this 3 days ago.

Is nothing going on here, don't you care or am I unwanted?

Is somebody maybe scared of me?

May I have to start a new thread because it's off topic?

A mod replied to me that it's against the rules. Are you aware of it? Do you know why?

Llamas
12-15-2012, 09:54 AM
If you see someone post two sentences and the second one is obviously completely wrong, would consider replying "Your English is good?"

If someone who has very little exposure to a language makes mistakes that do not impede understanding (using the wrong article gender, or pluralizing something that's already plural, does not impede understanding), yes, I would say that person uses the language well. If somebody from Africa with little exposure to English said, "Fishes you made for dinner is delicious," I would tell them their English is good - I understood exactly what they were saying, and the missing article, mis-pluralization of "fish", and subject-verb disagreement are small mistakes that don't cause a problem. Good thing you're not a language teacher; your students would get depressed and give up hope of learning. :P


In regards of the English language, I have a problem with prepositions. In English, there are no rules for prepositions, you just have to learn them. I find it very annoying, although it has its historical reasons.

Another thing I sometimes have an issue with, is subject-verb agreement. If I write in a hurry, I could say something like "The things I learnt is good" instead of "the things I learnt are good". The reason for this is that in my native language, we don't have subject agreement in that sense as the verb never changes in relation to the subject. It is "I are, you are, he are, we are".

English has just as many rules for prepositions as any other language - basically, there are quite a few rules rules, but there are also a bunch of exceptions that require one to just memorize and get used to it. All four languages I know prepositions in have the same level of rules - and prepositions just flat out suck in every language when you're trying to learn it. Try learning a Slavic language and suddenly English prepositions will seem easy because they're much more similar to Germanic ;)

Little_Miss_1565
12-15-2012, 12:37 PM
I asked this 3 days ago.

Is nothing going on here, don't you care or am I unwanted?

Is somebody maybe scared of me?

May I have to start a new thread because it's off topic?

A mod replied to me that it's against the rules. Are you aware of it? Do you know why?

When you post something off-topic in a thread like this, moderators are less likely to see it, which might explain why no one gave you an answer and not that someone is "scared" of you. When you have a question about the rules, it's a good idea to post a new thread in the Offspring.com Talk thread.

As one of the moderators who created the rule against multiple accounts, it's to discourage the amount of trolling and sockpuppeting that people do here and give the moderators a way to keep that nonsense under control. You might want to try asking the moderator who PMed you for more information in the future.

RageAndLov
12-15-2012, 05:12 PM
English has just as many rules for prepositions as any other language - basically, there are quite a few rules rules, but there are also a bunch of exceptions that require one to just memorize and get used to it. All four languages I know prepositions in have the same level of rules - and prepositions just flat out suck in every language when you're trying to learn it. Try learning a Slavic language and suddenly English prepositions will seem easy because they're much more similar to Germanic ;)

Yeah, I didn't want to make the generalising statement that every language is like that, because I have limited knowledge of languages beyond Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, English and Spanish, but I have suspected that it is like that in most languages.

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-15-2012, 07:58 PM
In regards of the English language, I have a problem with prepositions. In English, there are no rules for prepositions, you just have to learn them. I find it very annoying, although it has its historical reasons.

Another thing I sometimes have an issue with, is subject-verb agreement. If I write in a hurry, I could say something like "The things I learnt is good" instead of "the things I learnt are good". The reason for this is that in my native language, we don't have subject agreement in that sense as the verb never changes in relation to the subject. It is "I are, you are, he are, we are".

...and "it are." XP
Yeah, English is tough in some ways. And plurals change the forms of verbs, too, like in "the cat has" and "the cats have."

Llamas
12-15-2012, 08:04 PM
And plurals change the forms of verbs, too, like in "the cat has" and "the cats have."

Actually, the plural just puts the verb back in its base form, the infinitive; therefore, the plural never changes the verb (the only exception is with "to be"). Only 3rd person singular needs verb conjugation - and that's actually one of the easier things about English, considering verb conjugation is typically MUCH more complicated in other languages.

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-15-2012, 08:38 PM
Actually, the plural just puts the verb back in its base form, the infinitive; therefore, the plural never changes the verb (the only exception is with "to be"). Only 3rd person singular needs verb conjugation - and that's actually one of the easier things about English, considering verb conjugation is typically MUCH more complicated in other languages.

I mean it changes the spelling, not the verb itself. Yeah, conjugating verbs in German takes practice and memorization, and you have to be very conscious of modal verbs.

Llamas
12-16-2012, 05:52 AM
I mean it changes the spelling, not the verb itself. Yeah, conjugating verbs in German takes practice and memorization, and you have to be very conscious of modal verbs.

No, it really doesn't change the spelling. Look.

Verb: to have

I have
You (informal singular) have
He/she/it [the cat] has
We have
They [the cats] have
You (formal/plural) have

Verb: to do

I do
You (informal singular) do
He/she/it [the cat] does
We do
They [the cats] do
You (formal/plural) do

The ONLY way the verb's spelling changes (aka, the verb is conjugated) is when you're using third person singular. Pluralization does NOT change the spelling of the verb; like nearly ever other case, it is infinitive.

Compare it to a language like Slovene

Verb: to do (delati)

Jaz delam
Ti delaš
On/ona/oni dela
Mi/me delamo
Vi/ve/vi delate
Oni/one/ona delajo

Unlike in Germanic languages, German and English, the verb conjugates so that it is never the infinitive... which is ridiculous. English conjugation is EASY, and in German you still have things like "wir machen, sie machen, Sie machen" - all three of those are infinitive, which is fabulous.

Edit: by the way, RageandLov, are you saying that in Norwegian, there's NO verb conjugation whatsoever and you just use the infinitive all the time?? Cause that's kinda awesome.

WebDudette
12-16-2012, 07:40 AM
I skipped a lot of posts, but I want to say this; the English language is fucked up yo'.

Llamas
12-16-2012, 07:46 AM
I skipped a lot of posts, but I want to say this; the English language is fucked up yo'.

I don't think it's more fucked up than any other language, but https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/298535_261408577295530_806999888_n.jpg

While there are actual explanations for nearly all of these, the vegetarian/humanitarian one bugs me, because the suffix in vegetarian is just -rian, so obviously humanitarian comes from humanity and not human. So unless they're joking that a humanitarian must eat humanity, that one doesn't make sense and kinda bugs me :P

RageAndLov
12-16-2012, 05:48 PM
Edit: by the way, RageandLov, are you saying that in Norwegian, there's NO verb conjugation whatsoever and you just use the infinitive all the time?? Cause that's kinda awesome.

Yep, it is very easy that way. I don't see a need for differing between the various subjects. You can imagine how hard it was (and is) for me to learn Spanish with all those different verbs. It is just like Slovene it seems:

To have (tener)
Yo tengo
Tu tenes
El/ella tiene
Nosotros tenemos
Vosotros tenéis
Ellos tienen

Norwegian in comparison:

To have (Å ha)
Jeg har
Du har
Han/hun/det har
Vi har
De har
Dere har

Llamas
12-16-2012, 05:58 PM
Yep, it is very easy that way. I don't see a need for differing between the various subjects. You can imagine how hard it was (and is) for me to learn Spanish with all those different verbs. It is just like Slovene it seems:

To have (tener)
Yo tengo
Tu tenes
El/ella tiene
Nosotros tenemos
Vosotros tenéis
Ellos tienen

Norwegian in comparison:

To have (Å ha)
Jeg har
Du har
Han/hun/det har
Vi har
De har
Dere har

Wow, that's awesome. I mean, in Slovene, it can be useful that the verbs conjugate because they you don't have to use a pronoun. Instead of saying "jaz grem" (I'm going) or "mi gremo" (we're going), you can just say "grem" or "gremo". But still, it must be really hard to learn to conjugate verbs when it DOESN'T EXIST in your language, haha. Spanish conjugation sounds almost as fun as Slovene - except Slovene actually has 3 more cases. There's I, you singular informal, he/she/it, the two of us, the two of you, the two of them, we, they, you plural/formal. I'm still freaked out about the dual cases... jesus christ.

RageAndLov
12-16-2012, 06:51 PM
Wow, that's awesome. I mean, in Slovene, it can be useful that the verbs conjugate because they you don't have to use a pronoun. Instead of saying "jaz grem" (I'm going) or "mi gremo" (we're going), you can just say "grem" or "gremo". But still, it must be really hard to learn to conjugate verbs when it DOESN'T EXIST in your language, haha. Spanish conjugation sounds almost as fun as Slovene - except Slovene actually has 3 more cases. There's I, you singular informal, he/she/it, the two of us, the two of you, the two of them, we, they, you plural/formal. I'm still freaked out about the dual cases... jesus christ.

You have the same thing in Spanish where you can cut the pronoun as it is obvious to whom you are referring when just saying the verb. I still think it is easier just having to use the pronoun, but have only one verb. Of course I am biased to this, because as you point out, it is indeed hard to learn to conjugate verbs when it doesn't exist in my native language. That is why I make so fundamental mistakes when using English, even though English is one of the easier languages in regards of conjugation.

The "two of us/you/them" is weird, but I can see how it is handy. At least Slovene doesn't have the same word for singular you and plural you like English does. That has always annoyed me and it causes a lot of confusion.

_Lost_
12-16-2012, 09:25 PM
Semi related: My dad posted a status on facebook that said, "Guano loco, si?" It simply does not have the same ring to it as "batshit crazy" does.

MOTO13
12-17-2012, 07:38 AM
One thing I could never understand...how the hell do you pre-warn someone? Makes no sense.

"Melyssa K" Kennedy
12-17-2012, 05:10 PM
One thing I could never understand...how the hell do you pre-warn someone? Makes no sense.

"Hey, I'm about to warn you about something that will happen!" Just like that.