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ThrashedThrasher
04-04-2005, 08:07 PM
This is probably a really fucking simple problem, but unfortunately Math is not my strength in school.


Question : The sum of the values in a particular set of data is 250, and the mean is 25. What is the set of data that fits this description?

Sinister
04-04-2005, 08:11 PM
lol, good luck trying to find anyone with the slightest interest in math here ! LOL !

Renegade6
04-04-2005, 08:14 PM
Pi=3.14
E=mc2

Betty
04-04-2005, 08:20 PM
This is probably a really fucking simple problem, but unfortunately Math is not my strength in school.


Question : The sum of the values in a particular set of data is 250, and the mean is 25. What is the set of data that fits this description?

I really like this answer, and I think it's correct...

25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25

Add 'em up, get 250. Mean is clearly 25.

Isolated Fury
04-04-2005, 08:23 PM
How many terms are to be listed in the set of data? If it doesn't specify, then take that advice^^^.

sKratch
04-04-2005, 08:26 PM
I'm not very familiar with statistics. However, it seems that there should be an intuitive solution.

nieh
04-04-2005, 08:30 PM
I really like this answer, and I think it's correct...

25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25

Add 'em up, get 250. Mean is clearly 25.

you beat me!

Betty
04-04-2005, 08:35 PM
How many terms are to be listed in the set of data? If it doesn't specify, then take that advice^^^.

If the sum is 250 and the mean 25, there has to be 10 values. Because that is the definition of the mean. The sum divided by the number of values gives the mean. Hence 250/x = 25. x=10.

Anyway, Josh, I am clearly the most uber skilled math person here for winning.

nieh
04-04-2005, 08:40 PM
you could technically make it 24, 24, 24, 24, 24, 26, 26, 26, 26, 26 too, or any other random combination of stuff like that. The question's really unanswerable because there's too many possible answers.

Isolated Fury
04-04-2005, 08:41 PM
If the sum is 250 and the mean 25, there has to be 10 values. Because that is the definition of the mean. The sum divided by the number of values gives the mean. Hence 250/x = 25. x=10.

Anyway, Josh, I am clearly the most uber skilled math person here for winning.

Haha...There doesn't have to be only 10 terms. Believe me. You can fudge so many numbers to get whatever you want. I just finished my semester of statistics...

Betty
04-04-2005, 08:42 PM
Yup. Quite true. I think the 25 combo is cooler though since it makes it seem more simple.

But yeah, makes me wonder if there were some other context to the question. Otherwise it's kinda dumb.

Isolated Fury
04-04-2005, 08:43 PM
Yup. Quite true. I think the 25 combo is cooler though since it makes it seem more simple.

But yeah, makes me wonder if there were some other context to the question. Otherwise it's kinda dumb.

Yes, your 25 combination is quite clever. ;)

Betty
04-04-2005, 08:43 PM
Haha...There doesn't have to be only 10 terms. Believe me. You can fudge so many numbers to get whatever you want. I just finished my semester of statistics...

I did intro uni stats (dumbed down for biology students version) last semester and still don't recall the mean being defined in any other way. I welcome examples.

ThrashedThrasher
04-04-2005, 09:11 PM
What I copied into the message is exactly what the question is. Hehe, I'm just brain dead. I try not to make myself think that much outside of school about school subjects unless it's something to do with English.

Gordie
04-05-2005, 12:44 AM
i just dropped out of math 12 because i was failing, and dont know what i was doing there in the first place :)

Endymion
04-05-2005, 02:28 AM
Haha...There doesn't have to be only 10 terms. Believe me. You can fudge so many numbers to get whatever you want. I just finished my semester of statistics...

assuming, as was implied, that all values appear with equal probability, then yes there'd have to be ten elements. also, it's rare that you'd want ten elements of equal value in that sort of situation so 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 (each with probability of .1) might be a better choice.

Endymion
04-05-2005, 02:36 AM
an equally valid answer would be {1,249} where p(1) = 0.90323 and p(249) = 0.096774

RXP
04-05-2005, 04:06 AM
Betty's answer is better. Because it's a 13 year old problem not a PHD quesiton.

JoY
04-05-2005, 05:13 AM
I really like this answer, and I think it's correct...

25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25

Add 'em up, get 250. Mean is clearly 25.
what I thought.

you'd have to know the amount of data & then still you can't calculate a certain answer. you can guess, take a pick of numbers, as long as the conditions (mean & sum) are present in your answer. (odd English, I know)

Betty
04-05-2005, 07:02 AM
You're such a showoff Endy.

Also, the 25, 25, 25... answer is SO MUCH COOLER than your 21, 22, 23... one. Dumb questions get dumb answers, that's my motto.

And I'm sure the probability answer would get a big "what the fuck" from the teacher.

Endymion
04-05-2005, 09:17 AM
i love you, betty.