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sk8ter-hater
04-24-2005, 06:39 PM
Can you use the word "couldn't've"?

TheUnholyNightbringer
04-24-2005, 06:40 PM
Er. Good point.

I've never heard any rule against using 2 apostrophes in a word.. but "couldn't have" is probably better. So yes, I think so, but it doesn't look very good.

Isolated Fury
04-24-2005, 06:41 PM
No

(Ten characters)

sk8ter-hater
04-24-2005, 06:41 PM
I use it often, but I think It's wrong.

TheUnholyNightbringer
04-24-2005, 06:44 PM
I say it all the time, but I never use it in writing.

Rye
04-24-2005, 06:45 PM
Same... wow, the most random questions send you into deep thought.

Isolated Fury
04-24-2005, 06:46 PM
You can use the word "couldn't've" in speech, because it just sounds like you shorten the word "have." You don't really USE apostrophes when you talk, so it doesn't matter. However, in text form, it cannot be applied.

TheUnholyNightbringer
04-24-2005, 06:46 PM
It's true, this has really got me thinking. I'm sure it can't be used in writing, but then again, I can't think of a good reason why not, other than "it doesn't look right."

Rye
04-24-2005, 06:50 PM
Grammar teachers always tell you that 'whatever sounds or looks right isn't always right'... it could work in reverse I guess...

Isolated Fury
04-24-2005, 06:51 PM
Apostrophes are used to connect two words. They don't connect three. If people would slow down in their speech, they would see that it's just a big blob of words.

Isolated Fury
04-24-2005, 06:54 PM
Grammar teachers always tell you that 'whatever sounds or looks right isn't always right'... it could work in reverse I guess...

Only for a few instances, like answering the phone.



"Hello?"

"Hi, is Andy home?"

"Yes, this is he."

TheUnholyNightbringer
04-24-2005, 06:56 PM
Apostrophes are used to connect two words. They don't connect three. If people would slow down in their speech, they would see that it's just a big blob of words.

That's the one. I knew there was a reason.

coke_a_holic
04-24-2005, 07:01 PM
My brain hurts! No not really though, I don't really like to use huge contractions in writing. I don't normally write "could've" or "couldn't." I just say could not or could have. Just a preference.

Betty
04-24-2005, 09:07 PM
I've never personally heard a grammar rule stating that only one apostrophe can be used per word. I was under the impression it was simply to replace missing letters... while possibly connecting more than one word.

Examples:

Couldn't
Lots o' fun
Rock 'n' roll
the 'net

So, since using apostrophes in proper fancy grammar is not correct in the first place, my non-grammar expert but good at grammar opinion is that yes, you could in theory write it that way if you wanted to.

Endymion
04-24-2005, 09:30 PM
i'd've and other three-word contractions are not proper english, but are not all that uncommon in informal writing.

Rye
04-24-2005, 11:07 PM
Well in writing books if it's someone speaking you're of course able to.

0r4ng3
04-25-2005, 06:57 AM
what's wrong with saying "couldn't have" really fast?
________
California dispensaries (http://california.dispensaries.org/)

Vera
04-25-2005, 07:18 AM
No English teacher here but I like the way it looks. Guess it can be used but not preferrably in an English essay or anything that requires grammatic presiceness.

Whoa, I do not rock the spelling boat tonight. Apologies.

Nina
04-25-2005, 08:02 AM
Apostrophes are used to connect two words. They don't connect three.

that is actually what i thought.
yup.

foxy
04-25-2005, 08:32 AM
i got told off by my teacher for spelling shouldn't of shouldnt've but thats only useing 1 so why is that wrong?

sKratch
04-25-2005, 09:29 AM
First off, it's "shouldn't have", not "shouldn't of"; it's commonly mistaken because of the spoken double contraction which effectively makes it "shouldn't 've". Secondly, "shouldnt've" is stupid. The end.