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0r4ng3
04-25-2005, 09:26 PM
are oranges (the fruit) yellow or orange (the color)?

if you want to see where this argument comes from, see the "talk about the person above you" thread
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sk8ter-hater
04-25-2005, 09:28 PM
In my world, oranges are fucking yellow, they disgrace the wonderful color that is orange.

0r4ng3
04-25-2005, 09:29 PM
i agree that orange is a good color, but oranges are orange! why weren't they called "yellows"?
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sk8ter-hater
04-25-2005, 09:31 PM
You don't see pears being called greenies, strawberries reddies, m&m's rainbowies.

sk8ter-hater
04-25-2005, 09:32 PM
.........and because bananas are yellow.

0r4ng3
04-25-2005, 09:32 PM
yes but there's no colors called pear, strawberry, or m&m's

edit: banana isn't a color either
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sk8ter-hater
04-25-2005, 09:33 PM
Then we need to figure out what name was established first, the orange fruit or the orange color.

JohnnyNemesis
04-25-2005, 09:39 PM
The color was established first.

sk8ter-hater
04-25-2005, 09:40 PM
My bad, that doesn't help.

0r4ng3
04-25-2005, 09:41 PM
The color was established first.
the color came first, and the fruit was named after it, because it was orange.
same idea with lime, but that's a shade, not a color
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sk8ter-hater
04-25-2005, 09:43 PM
so I'm fucken colorblind, what the fuck is green?

Camilamazed
04-25-2005, 09:53 PM
That's a tough question for me :rolleyes:

Endymion
04-25-2005, 10:06 PM
so I'm fucken colorblind, what the fuck is green?

green is electomagnetic radiation at about 530+/-40 nm, or 5.6e14 hz.

SkunkIt
04-25-2005, 10:11 PM
I bought a necklace and for a long time I thought it was lime geen, but my parents say it's yellow, now i'm confused. Same goes for the orange. They look orange to me though. I think tangerines are yellow.

RedSlayer
04-25-2005, 11:20 PM
more like a reddish yellow

foxy
04-26-2005, 01:36 AM
orange cant be orange because its a secondtry colour and so needs yellow to make it

Tizzalicious
04-26-2005, 04:13 AM
They are orange! Some are a bit yellow-ish, but normal ones (here in Holland, maybe you have different kinds?) are definitely orange!

sk8ter-hater
04-26-2005, 06:01 AM
green is electomagnetic radiation at about 530+/-40 nm, or 5.6e14 hz.
It was a rethorical (or however the fuck you spell it) question.

0r4ng3
04-26-2005, 06:54 AM
orange cant be orange because its a secondtry colour and so needs yellow to make it
orange also needs red, so are people gonna start saying oranges are red?
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Hyper nova
04-26-2005, 11:45 AM
green is electomagnetic radiation at about 530+/-40 nm, or 5.6e14 hz.

green is a Colour (mixed from blue and yellow in art. And a primarry COLOUR of Light)

Green LIGHT is elecromagnetic radiation/photons (depending on how you observe it, known as wave-particle duality in Quantum mechanics) with wavelength of about 530 40 nm and a frequency of 5.6 x 10^14 Hz.

for you americans colour=color

notoriousdoc
04-26-2005, 11:47 AM
oranges are pink :cool: ;) :confused: :eek:

TheUnholyNightbringer
04-26-2005, 11:51 AM
for u americans colour=color

I really don't think that needed to be pointed out.

And they're orange. They're nothing like yellow.

Endymion
04-26-2005, 01:07 PM
green is a Colour (mixed from blue and yellow in art. And a primarry COLOUR of Light)

Green LIGHT is elecromagnetic radiation/photons (depending on how you observe it, known as wave-particle duality in Quantum mechanics) with wavelength of about 530 40 nm and a frequency of 5.6 x 10^14 Hz.

for u americans colour=color

you're an idiot, there's no such thing as "green light", color is simply the interpretation of a spectrum of em radiation.

plus, there's no 'particle wave duality' in quantum mechanics. everything is a wave in quantum mechanics, and everything is a particle in particle physics. you do one or the other.

Aimeht
04-26-2005, 01:20 PM
Orange is cool.

Skate Rat 19
04-26-2005, 02:01 PM
it depends, young oranges are more yellow

Endymion
04-26-2005, 03:18 PM
it depends, young oranges are more yellow

*unripe*..

Jack the Tripper
04-26-2005, 04:07 PM
Oranges are orange. Hence the name Orange

Endymion
04-26-2005, 04:12 PM
I really don't think that needed to be pointed out.

what he should have pointed out is that 'u' = 'you'.

wheelchairman
04-26-2005, 04:14 PM
Once someone asked me, 'I wonder what strawberry flavored condoms taste like.'

That is now the second dumbest question I've ever been asked.

TheUnholyNightbringer
04-26-2005, 04:15 PM
The first being..?

wheelchairman
04-26-2005, 04:20 PM
The first statement was an implied question. I forgive you, you are British.

TheUnholyNightbringer
04-26-2005, 04:22 PM
After a quick furrowing of the brow, I now understand.

I apologise for being such an idiot.

Unnatural Disaster
04-26-2005, 06:26 PM
oranges are orange

Isolated Fury
04-26-2005, 06:28 PM
oranges are orange

Hence the name...

Hyper nova
04-27-2005, 11:48 AM
you're an idiot, there's no such thing as "green light", color is simply the interpretation of a spectrum of em radiation.

plus, there's no 'particle wave duality' in quantum mechanics. everything is a wave in quantum mechanics, and everything is a particle in particle physics. you do one or the other.


Um you're the idiot green is the COLOUR viewed (interpreted) of Light at the specified wavelength
hence the "name" green light (please read thing rights). And YES there is such a thing as 'Wave-particle Duality' because Quantum mechanics is about interpreting every particle as having a wave-function associated with it. So every particle is both a wave and a particle it just that in QM you can't pinpoint the position of the particle due to its wave-function.

Please don't try and correct me (unless you have a Physics degree) as I'm currently in my second year at Swansea Uni Studying Physics

oh yer to clarify Green was the name given to the colour before light was found to have a spectrum of colours so green is not 'em radiation of 530 nm' but "Green (being the colour we see and just the name of) LIGHT" is EM radiation at 530 nm

Hence also Orange is not Light, Orange is a colour and Orange light would be light that is coloured orange.

And oranges (the fruit) are named after the colour and not the other way round so oranges are orange not yellow

foxy
04-27-2005, 12:21 PM
this is boring and orange is orange yellow is yellow red is red blue is blue and black is black ok
glad we cleared that up

Nina
04-27-2005, 12:41 PM
the color orange is in fact red; the molecules of anything orange are (if they really ARE orange) red.

okayi'llshutupnow.

p.s. "Quantum mechanics" is a difficult subject to me. i failed in my last exam. </3

Sunny
04-27-2005, 12:47 PM
in print, orange is made of dots of magenta and yellow.

*wanders off*

Mentally_Challenged
04-27-2005, 02:19 PM
Oranges are yellow of course. Remember, nothing is as it seems, therefore making oranges..yellow. Hmm.

Inuyasha
04-27-2005, 03:26 PM
Oranges are both colors, i've seen it yellow and orange

Isolated Fury
04-27-2005, 03:28 PM
Shut...up...

Endymion
04-27-2005, 05:36 PM
Um you're the idiot green is the COLOUR viewed (interpreted) of Light at the specified wavelength
hence the "name" green light (please read thing rights). And YES there is such a thing as 'Wave-particle Duality' because Quantum mechanics is about interpreting every particle as having a wave-function associated with it. So every particle is both a wave and a particle it just that in QM you can't pinpoint the position of the particle due to its wave-function.

Please don't try and correct me (unless you have a Physics degree) as I'm currently in my second year at Swansea Uni Studying Physics

oh yer to clarify Green was the name given to the colour before light was found to have a spectrum of colours so green is not 'em radiation of 530 nm' but "Green (being the colour we see and just the name of) LIGHT" is EM radiation at 530 nm

Hence also Orange is not Light, Orange is a colour and Orange light would be light that is coloured orange.

And oranges (the fruit) are named after the colour and not the other way round so oranges are orange not yellow

i'm a fourth year physics major with a research position. everything in quanum mechanics is a wave. there are no particles in quantum machanics, that's the fucking point. when you course-grain things you get what we commonly call particles. the term 'particle wave duality' is just a remnant from the early part of the century when people had no fucking clue what they were doing.

also, if you can describe color without electromagnetic radiation, i'll concede that point.

I don't know
04-27-2005, 05:47 PM
for me oranges are yellow, if it's orange it would be a light orange, but a light orange is not like that. They just gave the same name for the fruit because the ones who invented this word were color blinds. Or maybe in the time that they discovered the orange(fruit) it was really orange(color), and then they gave the same name for the fruit, but today oranges are yellow, heeheh :D

Skate Rat 19
04-27-2005, 05:49 PM
It depends on wheather or not its ripe, I've also seen a grey wrinkley orange its because its dead, but a fully matured orange is orange, however the inside and the juice is a whole nother story

0r4ng3
04-27-2005, 05:49 PM
wow this poll is still pretty strong. im considering not doing my annoying "poll of the day" tomorrow.

TheUnholyNightbringer
04-27-2005, 08:12 PM
i'm a fourth year physics major with a research position. everything in quanum mechanics is a wave. there are no particles in quantum machanics, that's the fucking point. when you course-grain things you get what we commonly call particles. the term 'particle wave duality' is just a remnant from the early part of the century when people had no fucking clue what they were doing.

also, if you can describe color without electromagnetic radiation, i'll concede that point.

Fuck, my head hurts. Oranges are orange! End of story!

Endymion
04-27-2005, 08:33 PM
Fuck, my head hurts. Oranges are orange! End of story!

i'll agree, my father owns a 12-acre orange grove.

0r4ng3
04-27-2005, 08:35 PM
i'll agree, my father owns a 12-acre orange grove.
...damn you're lucky...

0r4ng3
04-27-2005, 08:48 PM
I need a new poll of the day. Any ideas?

Hyper nova
04-28-2005, 10:42 AM
i'm a fourth year physics major with a research position. everything in quanum mechanics is a wave. there are no particles in quantum machanics, that's the fucking point. when you course-grain things you get what we commonly call particles. the term 'particle wave duality' is just a remnant from the early part of the century when people had no fucking clue what they were doing.

also, if you can describe color without electromagnetic radiation, i'll concede that point.


Fair Enough. I still Disagee but ill concede that i may be wrong (partially) but i dont think i am. I'll agree to disagree. Just answer me one thing (cause im confused). How come your a forth year major when your only 20? i thought (in the states) you left high school at 18 so first year of college would be 18-19 2nd year 19-20 3rd year 20-21 and 4th Year 21-22. So your Age would suggest 3rd year at most. Its that not how things are done maybe you could explain.

Oh yer good choice of subject. And i like your avatar. Classic Eastwood films are great.

Hyper nova
04-28-2005, 10:49 AM
the color orange is in fact red; the molecules of anything orange are (if they really ARE orange) red.

okayi'llshutupnow.

p.s. "Quantum mechanics" is a difficult subject to me. i failed in my last exam. </3


What do you mean? Never heard of that one. Maybe you could explain to me further. Is it some kind of biology or chemistry?

Hyper nova
04-28-2005, 10:59 AM
Oh by the way found this University (or somthing educational due to the .edu bit) site that is on quantum mechanics. I think this was the there thing that I found on google.

I know that some things on the internet is compleat tosh but this seems correct.

http://www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc/theory/quantum.html

Correct me if im wrong but does it not use the word Particles.

I quote "photons are the quantum PARTICLES".

Well just pointing it out.

0r4ng3
04-28-2005, 11:47 AM
Fair Enough. I still Disagee but ill concede that i may be wrong (partially) but i dont think i am. I'll agree to disagree. Just answer me one thing (cause im confused). How come your a forth year major when your only 20? i thought (in the states) you left high school at 18 so first year of college would be 18-19 2nd year 19-20 3rd year 20-21 and 4th Year 21-22. So your Age would suggest 3rd year at most. Its that not how things are done maybe you could explain.

Oh yer good choice of subject. And i like your avatar. Classic Eastwood films are great.
It's possible to start college early, if you're smart enough.

Hyper nova
04-28-2005, 11:50 AM
It's possible to start college early, if you're smart enough.

Mmmm True. But is it that common?

Endymion
04-28-2005, 12:55 PM
i'm actually in the second half of my third year, but i'm taking senior level classes because i took the freshman level physics stuff in high school so i started a year ahead. i'm also majoring in computer science now, but i'm only at the sophomore level there.

as for calling a photon a quantum particle, that's fine. call it a particle, then it's a particle and you're doing particle physics with it. the quantum just means it's the minimum force carrier for the em field.

here's the bottom line: you either think of things as particles and do particle physics with summed histories and feynman integrals, or you think of them as waves and do quantum mechanics. they are completely different and fully explain all phenomena on their own, there's no need for one above the other. IE young's double slit can easily be explained using particle physics and not a single wave anywhere. feynman does it beautifully in his layman's book QED.

particle wave duality is from a long time ago when people though you *had* to exlpain some things (namely young's double slit) in terms of waves, and *had* to explain other things (photomultipliers) in terms of particles. it's trivial now to explain all phenomena in terms of one or the other exclusively, no need for both.

with the advent of the standard model and the dominating figure of feynman in undergrad education of the past 40 years, particles is the way to do things now. also, all leading non-local 'hidden variable' type architectures--be it digital physics, process physics, or some other sort--would be most closely affiliated particles. note that hidden variable physics isn't seen as the almost-joke it use to be. it currently has HUGE proponents on it's side, including t'Hooft and Wolfram, and has support from the latest findings in string theory (ie quantized space).

Hyper nova
04-28-2005, 02:29 PM
How do you explain Youngs Double split with particle Physics. Cause i Havent done that yet. I Thought that you couldnt describe it becuase of the bullet analogy. Plus i Thought you could still think of particles in QM each paticle has a wave associated with it and its this wave that dictates the probability nature of position etc. of the particle. I really didnt think you could simply focus on one aspect of particles but both had to be taken into account.

I think im just getting confused. It such a difficult subject sometime to get ones head around

0r4ng3
04-28-2005, 02:32 PM
Now i know what TUNB was talking about. Damn, all this physics talk is making my head hurt...

Hyper nova
04-28-2005, 02:37 PM
Ha ha your head hurts poor you :D

Endymion
04-28-2005, 03:29 PM
How do you explain Youngs Double split with particle Physics. Cause i Havent done that yet. I Thought that you couldnt describe it becuase of the bullet analogy. Plus i Thought you could still think of particles in QM each paticle has a wave associated with it and its this wave that dictates the probability nature of position etc. of the particle. I really didnt think you could simply focus on one aspect of particles but both had to be taken into account.

I think im just getting confused. It such a difficult subject sometime to get ones head around

use feynman integrals, which basically is a sum over ALL possible histories.

in quantum mechanics you don't *think* of a "particle" as a "wave", everything *is* a wave. no particles whatsoever.

Hyper nova
04-28-2005, 03:35 PM
Mm ok Ill have to have another look at my notes. I Guess i got lost in the maths of QM and never really look fully at the implications and might have forgoten some of the ideas. But I have no idea yet What feymann intergrals are. Dont suppose you can explan further. I still don t see how Particles could explain the wave liek patterns of the Double spilt experiment

Endymion
04-28-2005, 03:42 PM
with each action you can associate an infinite number of paths. say, for an electron moving from point a to point b, there are an infinite number of ways for it to travel, and this is not limited to just those at which it travels linearly with time, or below the speed of light, we're talking ALL paths. with each pass there is an associated phasor.

anyway, so you've got a slit and you have particles going through it.. they don't have to travel in straight lines, there's no reason for that... so we look at ALL paths that go through this slit and hit the screen on the other side. if the slit is wide, then the paths that go through and then go way over to the right side deconstructively interfere with all sorts of other ones, but if the slit is narrow, the ones that go through the slit and hit some point over on the right are really close to each other, so the phasors add up.

Mr. Noodles
04-28-2005, 05:40 PM
are oranges (the fruit) yellow or orange (the color)?

if you want to see where this argument comes from, see the "talk about the person above you" thread
I don't know, but orange juice is yellow.

Hyper nova
04-29-2005, 09:01 AM
with each action you can associate an infinite number of paths. say, for an electron moving from point a to point b, there are an infinite number of ways for it to travel, and this is not limited to just those at which it travels linearly with time, or below the speed of light, we're talking ALL paths. with each pass there is an associated phasor.

anyway, so you've got a slit and you have particles going through it.. they don't have to travel in straight lines, there's no reason for that... so we look at ALL paths that go through this slit and hit the screen on the other side. if the slit is wide, then the paths that go through and then go way over to the right side deconstructively interfere with all sorts of other ones, but if the slit is narrow, the ones that go through the slit and hit some point over on the right are really close to each other, so the phasors add up.


i remember being taught somthing like that at A-level (17-18) but remember not really understanding and questioning a lot of things. Like doesnt that contradict Special Rel? And what the hell is a phasor in physical terms or why do you assign the phasors at all etc.? And i never really Understood from that analogy how a particle interfered with its self. I could understand that if a 'particle' had a wave-function then it was that wave that could interfer with itsself and the whole most probable location thing.
But the phasor thing no never got that.
Plus I've never gone been taught in more depth that what you just said above on the matter. Last time it was even metioned to me was 2/3 years ago. And you explained it better that my physics teacher at A level ever did.

Chears for you inputs


(on a side note to everone else sorry that this doesnt have anything more to do with the question)