PDA

View Full Version : sKratch's question of the day



sKratch
04-28-2005, 08:38 PM
Why is neo-conservatism more conservative and neo-liberalism also more conservative?
Sorry Mota, it's just been bothering me.

Endymion
04-28-2005, 08:49 PM
poor naming scheme?

sKratch
04-28-2005, 09:23 PM
Yeah, just like private accounts got turned into personal accounts by the magic media.

HornyPope
04-28-2005, 10:30 PM
I remember I was once browsing a neo-conservative platform that called for removal of all or almost forms of taxing and stated three roads to utopia translated to something like this:

1- take all funds from public services
2- magic happens
3- public services nevertheless remain fully operation and at great quality

Yay! I'm so voting for these guys in the next elections.

wheelchairman
04-29-2005, 12:06 AM
I'm generally under the impression that neo-liberals and neo-conservatives are words for the same people used by different other groups.

Although along this line of thinking, are neo-nazis more nazi than nazis?

RXP
04-29-2005, 01:22 AM
Neo merely denotes newer?

Mota Boy
04-29-2005, 07:41 AM
Why is neo-conservatism more conservative and neo-liberalism also more conservative?
It depends on your definition of "conservatism". The word "conservative" has a greatly different meaning in domestic U.S. politics and international relations. In I.R., "conservative" is traditionally synonymous with "isolationist". Conservatives oppose international alliances and prefer to focus on domestic issues.

Neocons first emerged in Vietnam when they broke off from traditional liberals because they supported using military force to promote democracy abroad. They came to allign themselves with conservatives once Reagan began promoting a strong military build-up to win the Cold War. At its heart, though, neoconservatism is an enormous departure from traditional conservatism (though neither is it all that liberal, as liberals traditionally wish to upold international law and work through international organizations) and many conservative writers (such as Francis Fukuyama and Pat Buchanan) oppose neoconservative policies.

And while neoconservatism mostly applies to international relations, neoliberalism most applies to international economics. Neoliberalism has not only been opposed by traditional liberals, but by conservatives also, as it promotes regulated international trade, often through such organizations as the WTO, IMF and NAFTA, not to mention that conservatism is associated with isolationist sentiments such as putting limits on immigration and "protecting" American jobs.

So although that's more than you probably wanted to hear, the simple answer is that neoliberalism and neoconservatism aren't really more liberal/conservative than traditional liberalism/conservatism, just different.

And you'll be hearing from my lawyers soon.

Mota Boy
05-01-2005, 10:28 PM
OK, I can't take this any more. I demand thanks.

HornyPope
05-01-2005, 10:32 PM
I completly forgot about this topic. I've no idea about the origins of the word because I hate getting in such details over politics, but I assume what you say is true and i'll thank you for the generous bits of information.


It depends on your definition of "conservatism". The word "conservative" has a greatly different meaning in domestic U.S. politics and international relations.

Good heads up here, i've the said the same all along when facing terms like "conservatism".