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Thread: what does bah-humbug mean?

  1. #1
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    Default what does bah-humbug mean?

    is it german for "christmas sucks" or something?
    no

  2. #2
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    I've wondered this myself. All I know is that a humbug is some kind of candy, or pastry. I don't know, I think it's edible.
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  3. #3
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    A humbug is a black and white sweet with a chewy bit in the middle. They're rather nice actually.
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  4. #4
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    I think it's just a saying.
    I wrote a four word letter.

  5. #5
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    Humbug is a minty sweet with a toffee centre. The saying Bah-Humbug is just a way of expressing dis-taste towards Christmas.

  6. #6
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    While it is usually used as a synonym for balderdash, poppycock, rubbish, and nonsense its earlier sense carried a connotation of a more purposeful kind of nonsense, an attempt to deceive.

    This word likely comes from common usage among students in the mid 1700s. The original meaning was a hoax, trick or deceit. It is also possible to "humbug" someone or to "trick" them, so originally the same word was useful as both a noun and a verb.

    In the famous usage by the Dickens character, Ebenezer Scrooge, he probably mixed the modern connotation with the older meaning - intimating that as far as Ebenezer was concerned, Christmas was at once nonsense AND trickery. This can be seen in his reply to his nephew on the occasion of his nephew trickily tripping him up in his own illogic. This view of Dickens' usage is reinforced by Scrooge calling Christmas "a humbug". It is incorrect usage to say Christmas is "a nonsense".
    Source: http://www.answerbag.com/q_view.php/11131

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yatesy
    Humbug is a minty sweet with a toffee centre. The saying Bah-Humbug is just a way of expressing dis-taste towards Christmas.
    Not really towards Christmas, just anything really.
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  8. #8
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    Christmas a humbug? Nonsense, uncle Scrooge!
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  9. #9
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    I think it means that you are trying to tell someone to shut up or somethin
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  10. #10
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    Read the damn thread before you post, fool.
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