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Thread: What are you Reading?

  1. #1451
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harleyquiiinn View Post
    I just finished Good Omens, which I liked a lot and now, I want to get a little more into it. It's not easy to read. Full of small references that you need to understand to fully appreciate the humour... I think I will try American Gods next.
    Pratchett wrote the majority of Good Omens and, in my opinion, most of the humour of the book came from him. If you want more like that you'd be better off reading Discworld, a generally delightful series.

    Gaiman is better at straight storytelling than he is at comedy. I enjoyed American Gods but I seem to remember finding his attempts at humour pretty clunky most of the time because of the otherwise mature tone of the book. He is good at the serious bits, and fine when humour is woven intrinsically into the plot, but struggles with actual direct jokes. At least, that's what I remember from possibly a decade (or more) ago.

    I like Gaiman but Pratchett is far funnier and just generally more talented as a novelist. Gaiman's talents are...less specialized, perhaps. Which isn't a bad thing at all. It's just a different thing. I suspect Gaiman himself would agree quite strongly with this assessment.
    Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Bill Hicks

  2. #1452
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    I found, when reading American Gods, that my knowledge of Norse gods was really helpful, but I also found a really useful site (that also has numerous books on it) that will go through little references page by page, so if I ever felt there was a reference that was going over my head I just looked at that.
    http://www.bookdrum.com/books/americ...bookmarks.html - It also explains really obvious shit too, which is a bit annoying. I never usually would use a reference guide, but I wanted to keep ahead of things.

    There's also another site (only the gods are real) which has a brief summary of the gods (and the people behind them), but sometimes a bit too much info (and spoilers!), so I looked at that after I finished.

  3. #1453
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    I've just finished I, Lucifer by Glen Duncan.

    It was....good. At the start I wasn't very impressed, as it kept jumping around, and some paragraphs were unnecessarily tough to read. But after a while I got more into it, and there was some pretty funny lines in it (one describing the bubbles from a fart in a bath reminiscent of the awakening of the kraken).

    Overall, an enjoyable, although sometimes frustrating, read.


    Next, I'm moving on perhaps to Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates, unless my last order of books comes in the post and I'm tempted by the newness of one of them!

  4. #1454
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    Finished Revolutionary Road last night. I liked it a lot. The only problem being I had seen the film a few years back so knew everything that was going to happen. But the inner monologue bits that obviously couldn't be in the film made up for it. Very good, overall.


    I'm now onto the 6th book of Stephen King's Dark Tower Series, Song of Susannah. A bit sad that I'm nearing the end of this series.

  5. #1455
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    The Todd Glass Situation by Todd Glass

  6. #1456
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    Finished Book 6 of the Dark Tower series by King, It wasn't as good as the other books in the series (perhaps because of the introduction of himself as a character?). I'm hoping the last one will get back to the level of the others in the series. It was still very good though!

    I'm now tarted The Time Machine by H.G. Wells. I don't know why I'm always surprised at how much I end up liking older sci-fi, but I quite like it so far!

    I'm also beginning the Middle English poem Sir Orfeo. So long as it's better than half the Mid English shite I had to read for my MA, I'll be happy!

    And I'm also reading Sellic Spell by J.R.R Tolkien, a retelling of Beowulf, which was just released in June. It's pretty cool because he also wrote a translation of it in Old English!

  7. #1457
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    What Are The Benefits Of Reading ? . will i get like Smarter. ! fast abecedarian ?! ... Thanks .

  8. #1458
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    really enjoying Dr. Seuss's "Horton Hears a Who". i think the Who is symbolic of minorities. Horton is just a deaf asshole. lovin the made up words tho

  9. #1459
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alison View Post
    Finished Book 6 of the Dark Tower series by King, It wasn't as good as the other books in the series (perhaps because of the introduction of himself as a character?). I'm hoping the last one will get back to the level of the others in the series. It was still very good though!

    I'm now tarted The Time Machine by H.G. Wells. I don't know why I'm always surprised at how much I end up liking older sci-fi, but I quite like it so far!

    I'm also beginning the Middle English poem Sir Orfeo. So long as it's better than half the Mid English shite I had to read for my MA, I'll be happy!

    And I'm also reading Sellic Spell by J.R.R Tolkien, a retelling of Beowulf, which was just released in June. It's pretty cool because he also wrote a translation of it in Old English!
    If you liked The Time Machine, see if you can't track down a copy of Before the Golden Age. It's a collection of 1930s-and-earlier Sci-Fi collected by Isaac Asimov, specifically stories which ultimately impacted him and his work during the Golden Age of science fiction. They've aged a lot but I found it a fascinating read, since it's interspersed with reflections by Asimov on science and writing and his childhood. While it mostly helps you realize what a self-obsessed narcissist Asimov was, it's still a good read and you can really see the seeds of modern Sci-Fi in it.
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  10. #1460
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    Quote Originally Posted by T-6005 View Post
    If you liked The Time Machine, see if you can't track down a copy of Before the Golden Age. It's a collection of 1930s-and-earlier Sci-Fi collected by Isaac Asimov, specifically stories which ultimately impacted him and his work during the Golden Age of science fiction. They've aged a lot but I found it a fascinating read, since it's interspersed with reflections by Asimov on science and writing and his childhood. While it mostly helps you realize what a self-obsessed narcissist Asimov was, it's still a good read and you can really see the seeds of modern Sci-Fi in it.
    Great, I must check that out, cause I did very much enjoy The Time Machine! Only problem was that it was too short (never a real criticism is it!).

    Just looked up Before the Golden Age and didn't expect so many in the series. But the more the merrier.
    EDIT: In fact, I just bought the first three volumes as one for one cent


    I'm currently reading East of Eden by John Steinbeck. So far, really enjoying it. I read The Pearl about a year ago and wasn't too pushed, and had read The Red Pony years and years ago and couldn't quite remember my thoughts on it (except something vaguely disturbing?? Does something disturbing happen?) so I think that's why I put this off for so long. But I'm really enjoying it. particularly like Samuel Hamilton (perhaps because he's a stereotypical poetic Irishman and I picture a W.B Yeats or James Joyce type character).

    Edit: Just read the wiki summary of The Red Pony and now realise, as a pony-loving girl of about 11 no wonder I was distressed!
    Last edited by Alison; 10-16-2014 at 12:03 PM.

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