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Thread: What are you Reading?

  1. #251
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Tijuana, Mexico
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    i just read "getting in touch with your inner bitch" by Elizabeth Hiltz, last night.

  2. #252
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    2,912


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    our illusion of innocence by peter unger!
    whenever i learn something new it pushes some old knowledge out of my brain, remember that home wine making course when i forgot how to drive?!

  3. #253
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Montreal
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    Les Misérables by Victor Hugo for school.

  4. #254
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    765


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    Stephen Kind - The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon

    TRIVIAL

    Und jedes Positron entlädt sich.

  5. #255
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,946


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    some tales of Edgar Allan Poe
    I'm just a sucker with no self esteem
    myspace
    ......

  6. #256


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    I finished the first part of Don Quixote and it was a fine and classic read (the second part, a sequal if you will, is half way thru but somewhere the novelty of the book worn off in favour of my recent interests). I have to go back over all the old plays I read in HS. It's amazing the little things you discover in authors tone and intentions when you pay attentionts to each and every sentance. A beauty.

    I'm currently entertaining the idea that the improbability of the setting of the older plays (i.e. much action happening over a short period of time, characters finding out one another in a wide populated continent, very little grey areas, the antagonist and protagonist complete each other etc..) is never the less more believable than modern stories where the authors push for the characters to have as much as possible in common with the reader. It comes out fake. You can't just relate to someone because the author wants you, can you?

    And I also finished The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by Mordecai Richler. In three sits--last one ending only ten minutes ago. Oh how I love his books. Mordecai could have--should have!!--been my grandpa. The son-of-a-bitch has an opinion of everything and had insulted every single Canadian and worldwide establishment and group depicted in the book, but no other novel I ever held in my hands came so frank to reality as I see it. I'd put in a couple of quotations for all to see but this book like no other epitomizes the concept of "look at the big picture".

    Fucking read it, guys.
    All I can hear, I me mine
    I me mine, I me mine

  7. #257


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    Oh and I also bought off ebay today Greenhill Dictionary of Miltary Quotations. The sypnosis according to the ebay seller: The distilled wisdom of soldiers across the ages, in one volume * 5,943 quotations by more than 800 military figures * All aspects of military experience from 2000 BC to the present day Peter Tsouras brings 4000 years of military history to life through the words of more than 800 soldiers, commanders, military theorists, and commentators on war. Diverse personalities-Napoleon, Ataturk, 'Che' Guevara, Rommel, Julius Caesar, Wellington, Crazy Horse, Wallenstein, T.E. Lawrence, Saladin, Eisenhower and many more-sit side by side as a result of their participation in battle across the ages.

    I was just searching for some Zhukov quotes earlier today and ran across this piece. What a gift to men!
    All I can hear, I me mine
    I me mine, I me mine

  8. #258
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    The basement of the Alamo
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    1,528


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    "our band could be your life"
    its a geat book about bands like black flag, big black, the replacements, minor threat, dinosaur jr., husker du, mudhoney, beat happening, and a few others. let me say again: great book.
    Rita corny, Michael

  9. #259
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,523


    Lightbulb

    I'm about to start the Notes from the Underground. That's the only Dostoyevsky I got in my e-book collection, and I felt like reading something of his. I should steal some from home in the summer.

    Edit: this is not happening, I don't particularly enjoy reading it in English. I'll go dig out something else :/
    Last edited by Izie; 05-03-2005 at 06:51 AM.
    #N/A

  10. #260
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    england
    Posts
    622


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    Birdsong for english.
    and next i'll have to read Regeneration, also for english.

    i finished The Beach. it was really good. odd, but good.

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