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Thread: Look what I found!

  1. #1
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    Default Look what I found!

    50 Boletuses, but you don't get high from them.

    https://www.facebook.com/lubomir.sti...5567792988437/




  2. #2
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    Edible?

    I love mushrooms. Even though they're radioactive. And just how radioactive they are, I don't know.

  3. #3
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    Of course, edible.

    lol, radioactive? never crossed my mind. Well, the whole earth is radioactive, but only a tiny bit, AFAIK, you can walk on it and you won't die instantly.

  4. #4
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    I knew that, but I meant mushrooms in particular, since Chernobyl.

    Were they tasty? How did you prepare them?

  5. #5
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    Wow, a thread about shrooms that don't get you high. Riveting.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duskygrin View Post
    I knew that, but I meant mushrooms in particular, since Chernobyl.

    Were they tasty? How did you prepare them?
    And because of Chernobyl mushrooms are radioactive everywhere? It doesn't make sense. Chernobyl is far away from here. Do you have any scientific sources?

    They are tasty with scrambled eggs, but it's good to boil them, cubed, in water first in case there are any worms. We also dry them, sliced, with sunshine (again, worms will come out in case they are there) and put them into soups, the most famously in Kapustnica (cabbage soup).

  7. #7
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    Default Spoors and Radiation

    I'm also having a hard time following the science there. I'm not sure if just because the spoors for the mushroom were radioactive that the mushrooms themselves would be. Thanks for that stray thought, that'll cost me at least 45 minutes of wasted time Googling radiation and seed development. lol

  8. #8
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    Bsing, it has mostly to do with the lack of roots and the absorption and retention of nutrients.

    Plenty of sources, relying on word-of-mouth, all French obviously, had a bit of a ferret around and found various news in English, some bolstering my case, others minimising the issue:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...tish-port.html

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0225085313.htm

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effect...nobyl_disaster

    Immediately after the disaster, the main health concern involved radioactive iodine, with a half-life of eight days. Today, there is concern about contamination of the soil with strontium-90 and caesium-137, which have half-lives of about 30 years. The highest levels of caesium-137 are found in the surface layers of the soil where they are absorbed by plants, insects and mushrooms, entering the local food supply. Some scientists fear that radioactivity will affect the local population for the next several generations. Note that caesium is not mobile in most soils because it binds to the clay minerals.[37][38][39]

    Tests (c. 1997) showed that caesium-137 levels in trees of the area were continuing to rise. It is unknown if this is still the case. There is some evidence that contamination is migrating into underground aquifers and closed bodies of water such as lakes and ponds (2001, Germenchuk). The main source of elimination is predicted to be natural decay of caesium-137 to stable barium-137, since runoff by rain and groundwater has been demonstrated to be negligible.


    However, 30 years later, animals and plants have reclaimed the abandoned zone to make it their habitat. Even the site of the explosion was flourishing with wildlife in 2012 as birds nested in the wrecked nuclear plant, and plants and mushrooms lived in and on the site.[29] A 2015 study found similar numbers of mammals in the zone compared to nearby similar nature reserves[28] and the wildlife population was probably higher than it had been before the accident.[30]

    Due to the bioaccumulation of caesium-137, some mushrooms as well as wild animals which eat them, e.g. wild boars hunted in Germany and deer in Austria, may have levels which are not considered safe for human consumption.[31] Mandatory radioactivity testing of sheep in parts of the UK that graze on lands with contaminated peat was lifted in 2012.[32]


    Yes, the French authorities did claim that the Chernobyl cloud stopped at the Italian border. Migration control! Passport, please!

    Roster of mushrooms: http://www.healwithfood.org/articles...um-nuclear.php

    http://www.greenfacts.org/en/chernob...ironment.htm#3


    Cabbage soup with mushrooms, sounds delicious...
    Among my favorites are chanterelles and boletus, but really I like many, just dried and with some salt and herbs is fine.

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