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Thread: Racist Stereotypes

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    Default Racist Stereotypes

    I don't think there is any reason to believe that any race is superior to another. But I can't truly and honestly say that I observe all stereotypes (positive and negative) to be false. I can't fight the overwhelming sense that I'm lying to myself and denying my true observations in order to fall in line with social theories that seem just and politically correct.

    I think I'd prefer to start with just that thought, and elaborate based on people's reaction.

    Oh yeah, and just to show I have some awareness about my fellow white people, I find this list to be mostly true: http://stuffwhitepeoplelike.com/full...e-people-like/ (I remember someone posted this here a while ago).
    Last edited by bighead384; 04-19-2011 at 09:37 AM.
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    There's a difference between observing a trend where's a slightly higher chance of something being true, than believing that because X is a member of this race, he must therefore Y.

    That StuffWhitePeopleLike is exactly the kind of thing I'm talking about. It's describing a certain class of people within a certain context, not white people. I mean does that describe any republicans?
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    Danes tend to discuss the terms of a given problem instead of answering it.




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    So, you're hesitantly and cautiously suggesting that maybe, every now and then, just maybe, a racial stereotype is founded on at least a nugget of truth?

    I love the smell of facepalm in the morning.

    Things like stereotypes and cliches always come from somewhere. They become overblown and exagerrated, sure, but there's often something truthful in there somewhere if you go back far enough. If you're merely talking about cultural preferences then of course those exist and it's silly to be so afraid of talking about it.

    Check this out. It's good stuff.

    By the way, your hesitant opening makes it sound like you actually want to say some really bigoted stuff but need to work your way up to it. I'm giving you the benefit of the doubt adn just warning you that your caution makes you look more guilty. Just say it already.

    Edit: Oh yeah, "racial" observations will almost always turn out to be cultural observations. Do keep that in mind.
    Last edited by Paint_It_Black; 04-19-2011 at 09:44 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelchairman View Post
    There's a difference between observing a trend where's a slightly higher chance of something being true, than believing that because X is a member of this race, he must therefore Y.
    Okay, but then isn't it natural to then ask "why have I noticed that there is a slightly higher chance of (insert stereotype) being true"? The increased likelihood of something being true must be for some reason. Sometimes the reason may have an obvious sociological explanation, but other times, I have no idea what the hell it could be.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bighead384 View Post
    Okay, but then isn't it natural to then ask "why have I noticed that there is a slightly higher chance of (insert stereotype) being true"? The increased likelihood of something being true must be for some reason. Sometimes the reason may have an obvious sociological explanation, but other times, I have no idea what the hell it could be.
    I'm British. I still occasionally try to like tea just because I'm supposed to like it. You see where I'm going with this? Just one of many possible causes of course.
    Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Bill Hicks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paint_It_Black View Post
    I'm British. I still occasionally try to like tea just because I'm supposed to like it. You see where I'm going with this? Just one of many possible causes of course.
    True, but I am thinking more about behaviors than preferences for certain things. For example, if tea was easily found in England, than it is obvious why that would become a cultural preference.

    Stereotypes that relate to behaviors in social situations, I'd imagine, often have extremely abstract sociological/cultural answers. This becomes a problem, because then, only the people that are willing to ponder these abstract answers will be likely to have non-racist explanations for these phenomenons.
    Last edited by bighead384; 04-20-2011 at 10:18 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bighead384 View Post
    Stereotypes that relate to behaviors in social situations, I'd imagine, have extremely abstract sociological/cultural answers.
    Sometimes, probably. But often I think they have simple sociological answers. One of which is conforming to expectations. Conforming to stereotypes. It's easy to fall into behaviour that is expected of you.

    Perhaps you really want to know where they come from in the first place.

    Quote Originally Posted by bighead384 View Post
    For example, if tea was easily found in England, than it is obvious why that would become a cultural preference.
    But tea wasn't always easily found in England.

    "Tea, that most quintessential of English drinks, is a relative latecomer to British shores. Although the custom of drinking tea dates back to the third millennium BC in China, it was not until the mid 17th century that the beverage first appeared in England.

    The use of tea spread slowly from its Asian homeland, reaching Europe by way of Venice around 1560, although Portuguese trading ships may have made contact with the Chinese as early as 1515.

    It was the Portuguese and Dutch traders who first imported tea to Europe, with regular shipments by 1610. England was a latecomer to the tea trade, as the East India Company did not capitalize on tea's popularity until the mid-18th century."

    Source here.

    Why did tea become so popular in England? I don't know. Why is it the British are stereotypically associated with tea when I would imagine the Chinese are still rather fond of it too (amongst others)? I don't know. These types of questions probably have the complicated and possibly abstract answers you're looking for. But once a stereotype is in place it's quite easy to understand why some of why it is commonly reinforced.

    Your basic premise for this thread seemed to be that stereotypes often appear true in your subjective experience. You seemed curious as to why. I think how they came into existence is the real question.

    But come on, man up and tell us which stereotypes you have personally observed to be accurate. Don't be scared of it. It's healthy to discuss this stuff. In fact I think the reluctance to discuss things like this actually contributes to racism in society. How can any opinions be changed without open discourse? Even if what you secretly wish to share with us turns out to be bigoted and unfair we can perhaps help you see where you went wrong, or whatever. For example, let's say you secretly want to tell us that every ex-con you know is black. We could explain how the socio-economic system is unfortunately weighed against them. But without talking about it, you're going to just keep seeing this trend until you become convinced black people are inherently prone to crime. That was purely an example. I'm not suggesting what you have in mind is anything like that. It's just the first thing I could think of to illustrate my point.

    Go ahead and share.

    Here's one I've heard myself. Black people loves 'em some Jesus. I intentionally typed that the way I've heard it because it's actually significant. It's associating an uneducated way of speaking with black people. Black people traditionally don't get the same education opportunities as white people, for a variety of reasons that don't matter right now. And religion tends to be more popular amongst the less educated. I won't say it's the entire reason for the stereotype because even I can think of other contributing factors and because my intention right now is not to imply that religion is only for the stupid. Or in fact that uneducated is the same as stupid. But it is a quantifiable fact that black people as a whole receive less education and that the less educated as a whole are more likely to embrace religion. So there, a racial stereotype that I myself regularly observe, partially explained.

    I'm entirely talking about the US in all this, of course.
    Last edited by Paint_It_Black; 04-19-2011 at 11:01 AM.
    Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Bill Hicks

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    Over here we all have that stereotype that Americans are loud and obnoxious...and well, my university seems to be loaded with Americans, most who seem to be loud and obnoxious. Behavior is influenced by society I believe.

    The Irish are known for being drunken hooligans, and I for one, cannot dispute this. Aren't I evidence myself. It is socially acceptable (well...to a degree) to get absolutely shitfaced at least once or twice a week, if not more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alison View Post
    It is socially acceptable (well...to a degree) to get absolutely shitfaced at least once or twice a week, if not more.
    I think many Americans would call that alcoholism. And they'd be loud and obnoxious about it.
    Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Bill Hicks

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