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Thread: I want to have a science discussion or two...or many!

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Static_Martyr View Post
    A dual, or a duel?
    Hahaha between that and my Austrialan thread, I'm on a roll today

    Either way, I'm not very good at history. I am really good at books, though. I kick ass at books. And toys. I'm really good at toys.
    Oh yeah?? Well I really love talking about exams. I LOVE exams and know so much about them! Let's have a discussion about exams! What's your favorite kind of exam?
    Quote Originally Posted by jsmak84 View Post
    I do not drink alcohol and coffee

    I do not smoke and do not do drugs

    I just do bumpin in my trunk

  2. #32
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    Oh yeah?? Well I really love talking about exams. I LOVE exams and know so much about them! Let's have a discussion about exams! What's your favorite kind of exam?
    Personally, I really like talking. I'm good at talking, I actually know a lot of talking.
    "I'm sorry
    For all the things that I never did
    For all the places I never was
    For all the people I never stopped
    But there was nothing I could do...
    "

  3. #33
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    Hey, me too! I also know a lot about petting cats. My knowledge on that subject is just unbelievable.
    Quote Originally Posted by jsmak84 View Post
    I do not drink alcohol and coffee

    I do not smoke and do not do drugs

    I just do bumpin in my trunk

  4. #34
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    That's nothing. My knowledge of dogs is better. I know a lot of dogs, and I'm really good at them.
    "I'm sorry
    For all the things that I never did
    For all the places I never was
    For all the people I never stopped
    But there was nothing I could do...
    "

  5. #35
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    Anyone not believe that birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs?
    I said, "Hi, Greg. I'm the creepy girl." He chuckled, then wanted a handshake and I gave it. I wanted a hug and he gave it. One of his sons was there, too. Cute. Then Pete got him to autograph my sign for me because I was too polite to ask myself since he was on his way to eat. Pete also took this of photo of him holding it. - 8/2/2014.
    https://twitter.com/PeteParada/statu...56317329436672
    Our official webpage: http://offspringunderground.com/

  6. #36
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    Anyone not believe that birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs?
    There is some spirited debate amongst the scientific community as to whether birds evolved from Theropod dinosaurs, or perhaps more primordial quadrupedal forest reptiles --- those of the former school tend to cite the Late Jurassic Archaeopteryx as a transitional form between birds and dinosaurs, while those who support the latter hypothesis cite examples like the lower Cretacious Chinese Liaoningornis, which lived around 13.5 million years after Archeopteryx, was obviously a bird, and yet bears little to no resemblance to the reptiles of that era, in fact more closely resembling contemporary birds. There's a case to be made either way, though I lean towards "dinosaurs --> birds" myself; though it's possible that these can be cases of convergent evolution (different species evolving similar traits for the same reasons, but separately) --- there is some evidence to suggest that they could simply be branches from an earlier family tree of birdlike creatures, though this is somewhat of an uncommon position. There is evidence, though, that birds came in to fill somewhat of an environmental niche after the dinosaurs were wiped out and reptiles were no longer the dominant selective force (similar to how mammals, through humans, have filled the gap since).
    "I'm sorry
    For all the things that I never did
    For all the places I never was
    For all the people I never stopped
    But there was nothing I could do...
    "

  7. #37
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    First, I must inform you that Archaeopteryx is not a transitional species, though it is what we think the actual transitional species would have resembled. True birds existed before dinosaurs went extinct, theropods evolved downy feathers long before birds evolved, both have Y-shaped wishbones, the theropods' grasping wrist motion became the downstroke of a bird in flight, and there are countless other similarities. I have work in a couple hours. You seem to know quite a bit about this, so I wouldn't mind discussing it with you later. I wrote a literary review about it and made a powerpoint from the literary review. Here they are, in case you want to check them out.
    Literary review: http://melyssathepunkrocker.devianta...91590#/d4jour3
    Powerpoint: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwSXeFboQXE
    I said, "Hi, Greg. I'm the creepy girl." He chuckled, then wanted a handshake and I gave it. I wanted a hug and he gave it. One of his sons was there, too. Cute. Then Pete got him to autograph my sign for me because I was too polite to ask myself since he was on his way to eat. Pete also took this of photo of him holding it. - 8/2/2014.
    https://twitter.com/PeteParada/statu...56317329436672
    Our official webpage: http://offspringunderground.com/

  8. #38
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    What are your thoughts on psychological testing when it involves humans? Many people have very different views and I'm curious about what your take is on this issue. It is a topic that comes up quite often when talking with friends from when I was in college.

  9. #39
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    First, I must inform you that Archaeopteryx is not a transitional species, though it is what we think the actual transitional species would have resembled.
    There's a lot of evidence suggesting that Archeopteryx is, in fact, a sort of evolutionary "midpoint" fossil, or transitional form --- a close relative of the true ancestor of birds, most likely (the closest we've yet discovered, anyway), as we're rarely lucky enough to pinpoint the exact geological moment of divergence, but close enough to be considered a practical candidate --- the Caudipteryx zoui and Protoarcheopteryx robusta whose apparent morphological association with Archeopteryx commonly lead to the miscategorization of Archeopteryx as a true dinosaur, coelurosaur, etc., instead of a bird, are actually not classified as birds themselves for a number of reasons (namely the lack of an inverted "big toe" and some other joint- and ligament-related issues), wherein they differ from Archeopteryx. Anchiornis, also often compared to Archy, also differs in some important ways, and is considered more of a convergence from a recent ancestor, rather than a sequential evolution.

    Dinosaurs traditionally did not have feathers, for one, nor did they commonly possess opposable "big toes." The closest we find in dinosaurs is the aforementioned inverted big toe that bends in the opposite direction, similar to those of certain Raptors. And yet, the unique structure of the furcula [fuck you BBS spellcheck, that's a word] ("wishbone" in birds, or curved "collarbone" for ease of reference) and pubis found in Archeopteryx are also not generally considered to be characteristics of birds; they are found in several ancestral theropod species (such as the Velociraptor and Ticinosuchus). The pubis, for one, is rear-angular, a feature common to both birds and theropods, but Archeopteryx's pubic shaft (in cross-section) is very similar to that of the theropod Dromaeosaur, which is generally considered sort of a genetic cousin to birds; this feature isn't found in any of the other archosaurs, suggesting that it was probably a divergent case, not a convergent one.

    Also, the clavicles of some of the older established bird species share a lot of features with some of the earlier theropods, such as poor ossification (and occasional altogether lack) of a clavicle --- this could be taken as evidence that the "wishbone" is possibly linked to theropod evolution in some way, but it could also indicate an avian descent due to the similarities. Not that this matters; Archeopteryx's suggested ancestors probably predated the more recent theropods anyway.

    With all that said, Archeopteryx is generally classified as a transitional phase of bird ("Avialae"), very close to the cladical base, if not THE effective base itself, which makes it difficult to define Aves without it, given that we have so many species tied back to it in some way. You kinda have to move the whole chain along with it, if you decide to relabel it. Depends on the method you choose to delineate Aves, really. Regardless, it's pretty much universally accepted that Archeopteryx represents a transitional state or a common ancestor between modern birds and more traditional groups of dinosaurs.
    Last edited by Static_Martyr; 01-10-2013 at 09:45 PM.
    "I'm sorry
    For all the things that I never did
    For all the places I never was
    For all the people I never stopped
    But there was nothing I could do...
    "

  10. #40
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    It has been proven in fossils that quite a few theropod species were covered on some parts of their bodies with symmetrical downy feathers, obviously not the asymmetrical feathers of flight. It's proposed that their purpose was to aid in thermoregulation and serve as sexual displays.

    Archaeopteryx may be used as a model for a transition species, but it itself is not the transitional species, as true birds had already evolved by the time archaeopteryx was around. Therefore, it could not have been a transitional species.

    There are still arguments among the experts as to exactly what defines the clade Aves, and this debate will likely go on for many, many years. But we can still fit ancient birds species and theropod species on a transitional chain. What we may never know is which species belong on the same branch as the true ancestors of birds. We do not have DNA to test how closely they are related and too many of the links likely have never been fossilized. Considering birds and some theropods had hollow bones, it was impossible for all the species to be fossilized.

    I'm not sure how much sense I'm making right now because I'm tired and I had PT and work today. I just hope I didn't make myself look like a complete idiot. I'll have to review the literary articles I used as my sources to refresh my memory, as it's been over a year since I made my project or even studied biology.
    Last edited by "Melyssa K" Kennedy; 01-10-2013 at 10:13 PM.
    I said, "Hi, Greg. I'm the creepy girl." He chuckled, then wanted a handshake and I gave it. I wanted a hug and he gave it. One of his sons was there, too. Cute. Then Pete got him to autograph my sign for me because I was too polite to ask myself since he was on his way to eat. Pete also took this of photo of him holding it. - 8/2/2014.
    https://twitter.com/PeteParada/statu...56317329436672
    Our official webpage: http://offspringunderground.com/

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