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Thread: Brad Paisley and LL Cool J team up; solve racism

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Brad Paisley and LL Cool J team up; solve racism

    There are no words to describe the amount of facepalm going on right now.



    RIP Robert E. Lee
    "LIVE OR DIE, MAN??"

    "DIE!!!!!"

    "WRONG! HOOOONK!"

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    I dunno. I mean, it's pretty much the most generic, surface-y, feel-good attempt at discussing racism in the US... the music itself is AWFUL...

    ...but if you look at it through a different lens - a lens looking only at modern country music topics, and the types of people who love this kind of music - it's quite good. It's nice to hear at least an attempt - no matter how weak - at discussing this in this kind of ultra-white, pro-patriotism/nationalism music.

    But then I think about the song again and I cringe. The whole "our ANCESTORS did some shit and now we have to pay for it!!" thing... 150 years is only two generations, guys. There are great-grandparents alive today who were there. And god, the song is so, so shallow.
    Quote Originally Posted by jsmak84 View Post
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    LL Cool J cultivated a very different public image 15 years ago.
    Quote Originally Posted by T-6005 View Post
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmak84 View Post
    I do not drink alcohol and coffee

    I do not smoke and do not do drugs

    I just do bumpin in my trunk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Llamas View Post
    ...but if you look at it through a different lens - a lens looking only at modern country music topics, and the types of people who love this kind of music - it's quite good. It's nice to hear at least an attempt - no matter how weak - at discussing this in this kind of ultra-white, pro-patriotism/nationalism music.
    This is kind of my reaction to the song. Also, I didn't sit through the whole thing, but I didn't see anything I would classify as racist. Just a pitiful attempt at starting a dialogue.

    The whole "our ANCESTORS did some shit and now we have to pay for it!!" thing... 150 years is only two generations, guys. There are great-grandparents alive today who were there.
    I don't agree with this at all. First of all, tolerance and understanding has increased greatly since that time. Second of all, this kind of plays into the whole problematic mentality in which whites aren't allowed to express themselves in the race relations dialogue because the institutionalized discrimination has been on blacks. I'm sorry, but what's so hard to understand about a person being upset that they are suffering as a result of something that not they, but their ancestors did? In any other context, a liberal would take pride in being understanding about something like this.

    I remember JohnnyNemesis claimed that the song "Don't Call Me White" by NOFX was stupid because Fat Mike is 'complaining about having power' (lyrics link: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/n/n..._me_white.html). That was very ignorant of him. Fat Mike is clearly zeroing in on one particular aspect of race relations that he is bothered by. Nowhere does it say or suggest that he believes the issues he describes are worse than what blacks experienced. Nowhere does it say or suggest that he is unaware of the position of power that whites enjoy.

    I've heard many variations of JN's argument, and you know what I think? I think people are just latching on to a talking point that they think makes them perceptive about race.

    - white person points out ONE area of life where whites tend to be slighted or judged unfairly
    - liberal comes in and says talking point about how the white person is whining about an issue that is/was clearly worse for blacks
    - liberal is considered king of perceptiveness on race. End.

    How is that good for dialogue?
    Last edited by bighead384; 04-09-2013 at 07:21 AM.
    When they said "sit down", I stood up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bighead384 View Post
    - white person points out an area of life where whites tend to be slighted or judged unfairly
    - liberal comes in and says talking point about how the white person is whining about an issue that is was clearly worse for blacks
    - liberal is considered king of perceptiveness on race. End.
    Of course this happens. I don't think it's happening here, though. I don't think the song is racist. But it is stupid. And Paisley isn't doing himself many favors when his best example of being "slighted" is when some black dude at Starbucks hurt his feelings by disapproving of his Confederate flag shirt. I think he was probably caught up in a dilemma between trying to reach his target audience first, while also trying to say something less blatant and condescending than "Hey, be nice to the black people, will ya?" The result was a song that sounds sort of whiny in that he spends most of it trying to justify his own culture, up until the point when LL comes in to validate him.

    LL's verse is just WTF all over the place. I don't really know how the Confederate flag and "iron chains" are at all comparable to saggy pants and gold chains. "RIP Robert E. Lee" and "The Mason Dixon needs some fixin'!" were the two biggest lolz of the song.

    I think that both of them probably had good intentions (even if Paisley's revolved a bit too much around defending "where he's coming from" and if LL's revolved too much around dumbing down the black perspective in order to reach country fans), but the end product was hella garbled.
    "LIVE OR DIE, MAN??"

    "DIE!!!!!"

    "WRONG! HOOOONK!"

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    I'm too lazy to respond directly right now, but here's another example of how it's being suggested that whites have no part in the race relations dialogue. True, a person must understand that whites should defer to blacks on a lot of issues and understand that white issues in race relations aren't nearly as significant as black issues. But dialogue won't improve if whites are told to be quiet. And furthermore, it's not always a matter of white issues vs black issues because it takes mutual understanding in many cases too.

    Why? Because there are policies and government programs that relate directly to race relations that have been abused (the extent to which is debatable) and whites should have a say in it, even though I think it's fair that most of the time, they defer to blacks and try to understand the black experience.
    Last edited by bighead384; 04-09-2013 at 07:16 AM.
    When they said "sit down", I stood up.

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