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Thread: "Irregardless" is now in the dictionary?

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    Default "Irregardless" is now in the dictionary?

    ORIGIN: early 20th cent.: probably a blend of irrespective and regardless .

    USAGE Irregardless, with its illogical negative prefix, is widely heard, perhaps arising under the influence of such perfectly correct forms as : irrespective. Irregardless is avoided by careful users of English. Use regardless to mean 'without regard or consideration for' or 'nevertheless'
    I'm not sure how I feel about this. I specifically remember using "irregardless" in a post here and someone called me out on it not being a real word. And now apparently, it's an official word that is found in the dictionary. Do you consider this to be part of the natural evolution of language, and thus, not something to be annoyed by? I personally find it hard not to resent a word that was formed from ignorance. How do you feel about this and similar cases like it?
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    People that say "disorientated" make me violent.

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    "Irregardless" has been in Merriam-Webster for quite a while now, but I don't think that's reason enough for me to start using it. M-W accepts pretty much everything these days, and there are very few words that don't make the cut.

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    Or "conversate" as a back-formation from "conversation."

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    Quote Originally Posted by disclaimer_07 View Post
    "Irregardless" has been in Merriam-Webster for quite a while now, but I don't think that's reason enough for me to start using it. M-W accepts pretty much everything these days, and there are very few words that don't make the cut.


    Or "conversate" as a back-formation from "conversation."
    I checked out your link to the Merriam-Webster site and read the definition. I found it surprising that the Usage section gives such direct advice on the use of "irregardless": "Its reputation has not risen over the years, and it is still a long way from general acceptance. Use regardless instead".

    That kind of made me think: if it's to the point where the dictionary itself is explicitly stating "don't use this word", then is it really worth having it in there in the first place? Not sure how I feel about that...

    For some reason, "irregardless" seems to flow better in a statement, usually a statement of passionate dissent. It seems more commanding somehow. Or at least to me it does.
    Last edited by bighead384; 01-24-2014 at 04:43 PM.
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    It's a North American colloquialism that's been in use for roughly 100 years. It's stuck through time; it definitely deserves to be a word, as strange of a word as it is. I'll always say "regardless", and I'd never teach "irregardless", but it doesn't bother me one bit in spoken English.
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    So really the question is; what makes a word real?

    Most of us say a word isn't real if it's not in the dictionary. I like this definition. It's neat. Though it might only be true if you're playing Scrabble.

    In reality if a word is used by countless people is it not real whether or not it's listed in the dictionary? Is it not real...irregardless?

    I hate this word because it is nonsense and should not be a real word. But should not and is not are often worlds apart. How long can we deny it is a word? Until those of us who disdain it are in the minority? We might already be there for all I know.

    I think including it in the dictionary while proscribing against its use in its very definition is actually the best solution. That way we grudgingly accept it is a word due to the fact that lots of people use it but still get to condemn it as being utterly retarded.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paint_It_Black View Post
    So really the question is; what makes a word real?

    Most of us say a word isn't real if it's not in the dictionary. I like this definition. It's neat. Though it might only be true if you're playing Scrabble.

    In reality if a word is used by countless people is it not real whether or not it's listed in the dictionary? Is it not real...irregardless?
    My personal view is that a word is a word if it clearly gets your point across to the vast majority of the people you communicate with. If you only interact with 5 other people and you all understand each other fine, it doesn't matter how others see it; everything you're using are words. Otherwise, we have too many grey areas with various slang words and colloquialisms.

    Now, the definition of official or formal words is solely based on dictionary and usage.

    I hate this word because it is nonsense and should not be a real word. But should not and is not are often worlds apart. How long can we deny it is a word? Until those of us who disdain it are in the minority? We might already be there for all I know.
    Yeah I guess I kind of dislike when these things happen, but I think I'm pretty resigned to the way that language changes, and always has throughout history. Hell, technology exists because we're lazy - too lazy to get up to change the channel? Here's a remote. Too lazy to wait for the oven to heat up? Here's a microwave. It's natural for language to go the same way :P

    I think including it in the dictionary while proscribing against its use in its very definition is actually the best solution. That way we grudgingly accept it is a word due to the fact that lots of people use it but still get to condemn it as being utterly retarded.
    You think we should ban its usage? That seems a bit extreme to me... if you use it in an official or formal situation, you're stupid. But I don't think it should be banned...
    Quote Originally Posted by jsmak84 View Post
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    So if irregardless not regardless, does that mean it's with regards then? This is probably why people hate learning English.

    Also, autocorrect did not do anything to "irregardless" not sure if I should be pleased or frustrated.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Llamas View Post
    You think we should ban its usage?
    Essentially, yes. Though I wouldn't personally choose to call it a ban. I feel it doesn't quite bring the correct connotation to mind. Prohibit would perhaps be better. I'd like to see the word formally forbidden by an appropriate authority. More or less like MW has apparently already done.

    Quote Originally Posted by Llamas View Post
    My personal view is that a word is a word if it clearly gets your point across to the vast majority of the people you communicate with.
    You didn't seem to feel that way when you argued that "genocidal" is not a word even though it clearly gets its point across to everyone, including you.
    Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Bill Hicks

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    Erm. I say "disorientated".

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