Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Scotland!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,400


    Default Scotland!

    Off to the lovely capital in early March - I and another Frenchie.

    Would need tips re bars, nightlife, and well, museums and castles and villages as well.

    About three days. What are the local yeomen like? Do they wear kilts and tartans and sporrans? Do they play the bagpipe? Do they drink Guinness? What are they like in the sack? Will them beat me up or despise me if I barely dip my lips in their brew (by which I mean beer)? Do I have to revise Scottish history and literature? Is my English all right for Scots? What's the slang like? Must I brush up on Brave Heart & Rob Roy & Trainspotting? Are the toilets really that bad or is it just a crude joke? Do they still viscerally hate the English? Will they secede at the coming referendum? Anything special you want to say about the land and the people? Is the weather truly a bitch? Do they use pounds?
    Last edited by Duskygrin; 01-25-2014 at 06:56 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    People's Republic of Cork
    Posts
    1,934


    Default

    Guinness is an Irish drink, maybe you should have asked if they'd be drinking scotch.

    I visited Edinburgh a few years ago, it's one of the most picturesque cities I have been to. The castle is worth a visit. There were some pretty cool underground pubs/clubs worth a visit.

    Unfortunately I didn't see many men in kilts, but they wonderful accent made up for it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,400


    Default

    Thanks, duly noted.

    Also, ordered a guide online an hour ago.

    Really looking forward to that trip - if that was not already obvious.

    P.S.: has Scotland Yard actually anything to do with Scotland? Or with a yard, for that matter? *chuckles to self, then checks herself upon realising she's the only one laughing*
    Last edited by Duskygrin; 01-25-2014 at 08:42 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    9,992


    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Duskygrin View Post
    Is my English all right for Scots?
    You may want to dumb it down a bit. Monosyllabic is good.
    Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Bill Hicks

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,400


    Default

    Ach! Don't worry! Grunts and groans, I know!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,168


    Default

    Went from Glasgow to Fort William last year through the West Island Way.

    Here are my thoughts:

    - Scotts are nice
    - Scotch is good
    - Highlands look so beautiful that it feels like the whole country has been photoshopped.

    I forgot ! Haggis is actually good.
    Last edited by Harleyquiiinn; 01-25-2014 at 09:26 AM.
    ___________________________________________

    All the Beautiful Things you do

    Respect my authoritah !

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,400


    Default

    Have no clue where or what Fort William is. I'll go take a gander at what wikitravel has to say about the country in general and Edinburgh in particular, it's time I had the vaguest idea where it is I'm going to set foot.

    Wait a fucking second. The capital's petname is... Auld Reekie?!! What kind of name is that!

    Haggis is properly hellish, and anyway I'm not touching anything outlandish, but as it's only three days I can go without eating if it turns out the whole country has nothing edible to offer.
    Last edited by Duskygrin; 01-25-2014 at 09:30 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    5,203


    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Duskygrin View Post
    Do they drink Guinness?
    For the love of all that is holy, do NOT order a Guinness in Scotland. In fact, you're probably better off not ordering Guiness anywhere unless you're in Ireland.

    Me and a few friends went to Glasgow for new years a couple of years ago, and at one of the bars, we all thought the horror stories were untrue, and ordered a round of Guinness. When the bar lady proceeded to hold the glasses straight-level under the tap, and fill it from top to bottom, we lambasted her with how that would be conceived as a war crime in our country. We then taught her how to do it properly, so if you happen to find her, yes order a Guinness, otherwise stick to Ireland.

    And this by the way, is how you pour a pint of Guinness properly. This is not being fussy, it does not taste like Guinness if it is not done exactly this way.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6oO4z5Q4sE
    http://soundcloud.com/ciaran-lyttle
    I did it all for the lulz.
    Quote Originally Posted by bighead384 View Post
    I don't think I'm like this anymore, though many on this forum might think otherwise.
    As I've grown up some. back in the day. I even use myself as an example. reflected on things that happened in the past. I have a better understanding of things now. At least I can admit it now. I have somehow caused this situation by mentioning how I used to act on here. how I've changed. I'm a relatively normal poster now

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,400


    Default

    Erm... ok, then. I'll be sure to give it a wild berth.

    Unless someone offers me some! I wouldn't refuse, especially if he's handsome, that would be scandalously rude of me.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    9,992


    Default wide, not wild

    Quote Originally Posted by Duskygrin View Post
    Erm... ok, then. I'll be sure to give it a wild berth.
    'Wide berth' is most commonly found in the phrases 'keep a wide berth of', 'give a wide berth to' etc. It was originally a nautical term. We now think of a ship's berth as the place where the ship is moored. Before that though it meant 'a place where there is sea room to moor a ship'. This derives in turn from the probable derivation of the word berth, that is, 'bearing off'. When sailors were warned to keep a wide bearing off something they were being told to make sure to maintain enough sea room from it.
    Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Bill Hicks

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •