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Thread: On "claiming" a decade

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Llamas View Post
    For those who hate 90s music, which decade have you been alive for where the mainstream music we associate with the decade was actually good music?Seriously, none come to mind. 80s music was bad. 00s music was bad. The 90s at least had grunge and a few actually talented female singers make it big. I'm not saying 90s music is the best or anything like that (I don't think I would even qualify a decade of music so broadly), but damn.
    I really didn't much care for rock music in the '00s. I always felt a little qualified in thinking that because it's not like I'm a curmudgeonly old man talking about how "back in my day" music was better. I spent all of my teenage years in the '00s, so it kind of was "my day." But looking back, I realize that there actually was a lot of good music, you just had to dig for it or go out of your way a lot more. Jack White was basically the '00s Kurt Cobain (with Seven Nation Army being the White Stripes' Smells Like Teen Spirit), but the indie/garage rock scene didn't really blow up the way way grunge did. I don't know whether that can be attributed to plummeting record sales or what.

    I'd like to say that I'm a really big fan of the turn that alt. rock has taken in the past few years. Bands like Foster the People, Chvrches, and Phoenix are now the face of alternative (some would argue that those bands are not rock at all, which is a whole other debate) and they've achieved a lot of cross-over success. I'm really not all that happy with the resurgence of folk rock, and I'm thinking the crappy Imagine Dragons clones (I don't think Imagine Dragons are all that great, anyway) that are popping up are going to get old quickly, but I would say the state of rock music as far as quality goes is better in 2014 than it was in 2004.

  2. #22
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    Pretty much we all are babies of the 80s (86 best year ever!) But we grew up as 90s kids. love 90s and early 00s music. The other night at work some of my coworkers were playing a 90s mix on Pandora and I so happy remembering all those songs that I liked. I agree some music did suck but I just overall love that era.

    Besides you can't ever go wrong with 90s rap, at the bar dancing with your friends.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    I'd like to say that I'm a really big fan of the turn that alt. rock has taken in the past few years. Bands like Foster the People, Chvrches, and Phoenix are now the face of alternative (some would argue that those bands are not rock at all, which is a whole other debate) and they've achieved a lot of cross-over success. I'm really not all that happy with the resurgence of folk rock, and I'm thinking the crappy Imagine Dragons clones (I don't think Imagine Dragons are all that great, anyway) that are popping up are going to get old quickly, but I would say the state of rock music as far as quality goes is better in 2014 than it was in 2004.
    I wouldn't consider those bands alt rock, but then again I am the last person to argue about genres because it's futile. I really like Chvrches, though, and Phoenix is really good, too. I'm into that style lately, so whatever genre it is, I guess I'm a fan.

    Regarding folk rock, the mainstream bands that have started doing it really kinda get on my nerves. I don't ever listen to the radio, so I can't complain about how often I hear them or anything, but all the songs I do end up hearing from those bands are all kind of sad attempts at folk rock... like, nice effort, but you're basically just adding a bit of folk style to rock music to give a bit of quaint cuteness, and that's kind of annoying. I say this as someone who rather enjoys a lot of folk music.

    I might agree with you on the whole "rock music is better now than it was 10 years ago" thing. The Music was one of my favorite rock bands around then, Hanson started to become a rock band (and I really enjoy them as such), and I liked some of the emo rock around then (MCR, The Used, Taking Back Sunday, Fall Out Boy), some of indie stuff that started getting popular (Modest Mouse, Franz Ferdinand, The Killers), pop punk was still good around then... but there was so, so much of the generic post-grunge rock and rap-rock like Creed, Saliva, Papa Roach, Chevelle, Shinedown, Tantric, and Three Doors Down - and that stuff was what was EVERYWHERE, and that gives 2004-era rock a really bad reputation. However, I'm not really aware of what's huge anymore these days. Some of my favorite rock albums of 2013 included QOTSA, Arctic Monkeys, Vampire Weekend, Streetlight Manifesto, Kurt Vile, Hanson, Jimmy Eat World, Portugal. The man, Thirty Seconds to Mars, Cage the Elephant, and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs... meanwhile, I'm completely unaware of what bad rock music everywhere. So that gives my opinion a ton of bias - it seems to me that rock music is way better now than it was 10 years ago, but it's coming to me through a filter.
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  4. #24
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    PiB, when I use the "patronizing voice" you can just assume that you're exempt unless explicitly mentioned. I didn't want to go through the hassle of separating good nostalgia from bad nostalgia, and figured that most people here could benefit from vocalizing their nostalgia less. Of course I'm guilty of nostalgia like anyone else, but like T-6005, I grew up in a very different time and place from the childhoods of those around me. Of course American culture is ubiquitous so luckily we have plenty of things in common, but holy shit am I sick of the Kim Larsen song "Tarzan Mama Mia." On the other hand, its great I didn't come from a country like Spain or France, where the only things we'd have in common are Tintin (yaaaaaawn, fucking Europe and your second rate culture.)

    As for music, I feel like it was Limp Bizkit and KoRn and StainD and all them that was the start from moving rock from a "parents protect your children" genre to a "we're farcical hair metal but with feelings" genre. And yes I know hair-metal was considered subversive, whatever.

    It seems like the best rock, grunge being the most recent incarnation, was able to capture and illustrate the frustration of what its like being 20 something, and realizing that working is nothing like what you expected. And I don't mean "oh work's hard", I mean "careers don't exist, fuck your feelings." The same sentiment captured in movies like the Matrix, Office Space or Fight Club. Or perhaps best phrased by Franz Ferdinand (the band, hey welcome back to the light Europe) "Life is so much better on vacation, we only work cause we need the money." It's tedious to realize that the only reason to work is to fund your free-time.

    Really makes the phrase "Tune in, Turn on, Drop-out" feel more relevant now. Your education is not as useful as you think it is, your job is not important, focus on what is. Otherwise society will suck you dry and leave you as a hollow shell of a person, see: people on the edge of retirement.

    My cynical (I swear to God I'm not usually such a debbie-downer) point is, focus less on the past, enjoy your free-time now. Your teenage and childhood years were not that fun, but if you're lucky enough, you can probably make the most out of your free-time today. You can follow my choice of smoking a lot of weed and playing video games (its awesome.) Or whatever you find to self-actualize. Life since my teenage years has been about refining as much enjoyment out of my free-time as possible. Teenage-me wasted so much time trying to find things that were fun, without that though, I wouldn't be as relaxed as I am today. And I am relaxed, despite my rebellious unsatisfaction. If you think I'm rebellious now, you should've seen me as a snotty teenager.

    But hey you know what, nostalgia ain't all bad. I spent twenty minutes watching Twitch play Pokemon gold last tuesday. It was hilarious, though naturally I was with friends.

    Long story short, most people should cut down their expressed nostalgia by about half. The 90s were great, but shit's gotten better too. Internets gotten better, music is cheaper, movies are cheaper, technology is simpler and waaaaay easier to set up. Your phone can do things now that your computer in the 90s never could. And holy shit are tv's way better too. Somewhere along the way TVs got a lot bigger, a lot flatter, and a lot cheaper. Television shows are also way better. I mean despite the obvious lack of Star Trek.

    Short story shorter: quit being annoying.

    Back to talking to PiB, I have every intention of watching 21 Jump Street.

    Llamas, of course you liked Tori Amos.
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Llamas View Post
    I wouldn't consider those bands alt rock, but then again I am the last person to argue about genres because it's futile. I really like Chvrches, though, and Phoenix is really good, too. I'm into that style lately, so whatever genre it is, I guess I'm a fan.
    It's an interesting debate, I think. It's kind of a moving target, really. Back in the '50s, Elvis Presley was what rock sounded like. If you played the song "Ramble On" by Led Zeppelin to a group of people in 1959, a lot of them would probably like it. But I would imagine they'd all agree that whatever it was, it wasn't rock music, because rock music sounded like "That'll Be the Day," or "Hound Dog." Just ten years was the difference in the two sounds.

    Foster the People, Lorde, Gotye, Imagine Dragons… they sound very poppy, but I just see it as the new direction alt. rock is going. I qualify this opinion mainly because all of those bands caught on and recorded a #1 song on the alternative rock charts, and if I'm remembering correctly, those bands all peaked or came close to peaking on the alt. charts before even catching on to top 40 radio. I comb the charts pretty frequently, and every single released by those bands break into the alternative charts before the top 40. Is that a weak qualifier? Could be. All I know is that I heard those songs on radio stations that played old Pearl Jam and Stone Temple Pilots between the "newer" music, and in my mind, many of these bands have a certain "edge" to them that many pop acts simply don't have. An x-factor, if you will.

    It's not quite like a lot of pop on the radio right now, but it's also nothing like what we knew as rock music for the past couple of decades. Whatever it is, I really like it. But it seems like alternative and indie rock listeners find and celebrate these bands first and foremost, so I'm going with it being a new brand of rock music that's crossing over to other formats. It's a great thing, I think.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelchairman View Post
    Life since my teenage years has been about refining as much enjoyment out of my free-time as possible.
    I find that to be the only rational response when one finds oneself inexplicably self-aware and almost provably existent. I am amazed by how few people actually consciously share this sentiment. I go on and on endlessly about my existential nihilism in the way only someone who discovered the term a bit late can, and I vehemently espouse the idea that fun or suicide are the only solutions, and yet hardly anyone speaks up and says "yeah I live for fun too!" so at first of course I could only assume that each and every one of them were actively choosing suicide methods at the time. But most of them are still alive and I don't think they could all be failing their attempts so something else must be going on here. I always explain it so patiently and logically but they just...*sigh*

    You all stopped reading already, didn't you?

    Good. You should be watching 21 Jump Street.
    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.” – Bill Hicks

  7. #27
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    I could write a post but I decided that it would be PIB's first post... or very similar.

    Born in 83. 90's is my decade, as a kid.

    I haven't read the rest of the thread yet though... You have some sort of debate about music ? I think it's funny to have a discussion about wether or not 90's music was awesome on the Offspring message board...what's more 90s than that ?


    Also....



    Say JUMP ! (Seriously, that movie is hilarious).

    There is one thing I miss from the 80s, 90s movies... it's a sort of society innocence. I am not entirely sure that I'm not feeling that way because I was a kid back then and everything seemed easier... But when you watch 30 year old movies and recent movies, you realize that you had a lot of innocent, optimist movies in the 80s, 90s and that you rarely see these kind of movies now... I'm talking about movies like the Goonies, Big, Back to the Future... where nothing is remotely cynical. I feel like now, you can't be optimistic or people are going to think you're naive or just plain stupid. That you don't understand the world we live in. Imagine an artist writing a song like saying "we are the world, we are the children" nowadays. Even if it was Michael Jackson, he would be made fun of.
    Last edited by Harleyquiiinn; 03-14-2014 at 01:11 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harleyquiiinn View Post
    Imagine an artist writing a song like saying "we are the world, we are the children" nowadays. Even if it was Michael Jackson, he would be made fun of.
    Michael Jackson was made fun of. By my countrymen at least. Also, I love Jarvis Cocker and Damon Albarn is a twat. Getting increasingly off topic here. No, wait, because Pulp was an excellent '90s band! Well, that worked out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harleyquiiinn View Post
    I'm talking about movies like the Goonies, Big, Back to the Future... where nothing is remotely cynical.


    You think this movie is innocent? What the hell is wrong with you!?
    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.” – Bill Hicks

  9. #29
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    I looove the bunk beds scene "Ok we can sleep together, but I'm on top !"

    Ah anyway, I have a hard time explaining it even in french so... it might just be a feeling. I honestly think that the 2 last decades movies, even if there were excellent movies, lack creativity and that has something to do with what I said earlier but I'm lazy so... imagine a really good point that would make sense.
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  10. #30
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    I think you explained it well in your first post on the matter. I fully understood anyway.

    I'm actually a fan of the Nicolas Cage National Treasure movies. I feel like they were made in the style of sincerity and optimism you're talking about. Really good family-friendly fun.

    Admittedly I mostly enjoy dark films with very adult themes but I can certainly appreciate the value of more light-hearted offerings.

    The other day I rewatched Star Trek IV: The One with the Whales and delighted as always in how it embraces the sort of concepts you're referring to in a ridiculously exaggerated way to the point of being wonderfully absurd.
    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.” – Bill Hicks

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